Author Topic: Smaller coastal and inland vessels  (Read 3980 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2015, 07:28:26 PM »


Gambia, 5 bututs, 1971.



Gambia, penny, 1966.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2017, 06:49:06 PM by <k> »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2015, 08:36:12 PM »
Jersey, 25 pence, 1977.  Yachts.  Collector coin.

The difference is sometimes small, but since the boats are beached, I think they are fishermen, not pleasure craft.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline andyg

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2015, 10:49:25 PM »
The difference is sometimes small, but since the boats are beached, I think they are fishermen, not pleasure craft.

Peter

With the tide in ....
Mont St Orgueil is fascinating to visit if you ever get chance. 
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2015, 04:55:35 PM »
Tokelau, 20 cents, 2012. 

Tokelau uses the New Zealand dollar.  This coin is an official issue from a set that does not circulate, even though it looks like a circulation set.

Offline thepanda0

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #19 on: February 08, 2015, 06:30:34 PM »
« Last Edit: February 10, 2015, 12:54:45 PM by <k> »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2015, 01:26:23 AM »
The four benches make it look like a tourist-mobile. I wonder if the woman(?) is holding up a coconut she just bought, not knowing that there are so many growing in the wild they are free in practice.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2015, 02:31:50 PM »
Iceland, 500 kronur, 1986.  Fishing vessel.

Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2015, 03:37:59 PM »
Cayman Islands, 5 dollars, 1988.  Olympic Games, 1988.

Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2015, 05:17:41 PM »
Moldova, 100 lei, 1996.  Atlanta Olympics.

Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2016, 03:55:02 PM »
Isle of Man, 1 pound, 1983.  Peel Town.

Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2016, 12:03:31 PM »
Isle of Man, 10p, 1996.  Yacht.

Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2018, 02:54:50 PM »
Belize, $10, 1998.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2018, 08:55:51 PM »
The largest vessel in that battle was the Merlin, described as a sloop-of-war. However what little detail is shown on the coin makes me believe that the largest ship is not the Merlin. On a 1949 stamp of British Honduras, Merlin is shown with one Latin sprit sail and 8 gun ports. On the coin, two Latin sprits sails and a deck gun are visible. Therefore, the big ship is more likely to be Mermaid, a sloop with a complement of 25 and armed with a single 9 pounder or perhaps one of the two schooners, Swinger and Teazer, both carrying 25 men, Swinger having four 6 pounders and two 4 pounder canons and Teazer having six 4 pounders.

The two boats are quite likely to represent Towzer and Tickler, described as sloops with a crew of 25 under the command of a merchant captain and armed with one 18 pounder. The man standing aft is indeed in civilian clothes.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 25, 2018, 09:09:22 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2018, 09:11:07 PM »
WMK gives it as "the sloop HMS Merlin". But from what you write, that could be incorrect. If the Royal Mint documents get released in the next few years, maybe we will find out.

Offline eurocoin

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Re: Smaller coastal and inland vessels
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2018, 09:49:14 PM »
Central Bank of Belize says it is HMS Merlin. They describe the boats as Baymen gun flats.