Author Topic: Steel-hulled sailing ships  (Read 3853 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Steel-hulled sailing ships
« on: June 14, 2010, 02:58:43 PM »
Poland, 5 zlotych, 1936.

Supposed to be the Dar Pomorza, a merchantman designed for the Baltic trade. Rigging and hull are quite inaccurate, though. The ship was built in Hamburg, Germany in 1909, seized by France as war reparation in 1920,  repurchased by Poland with funds raised by donations from Pomeranian citizens in 1927. Except for the period 1939-1945, the "white frigate" served as a training vessel for young Polish sailors. She visited Amsterdam in 1980. Since 1982 she has served as a stationary museum ship in the port of Gdynia (Danzig).

Peter
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 05:54:19 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2010, 03:05:56 PM »
Here is a legendary ship on a pseudo coin from Palau. The four-master barque Pamir was launched in 1905 as a cargo ship.  She was 114 meters long with a 14 meter beam (374 x 46 feet).  In 1951 she was acquired as a training ship for the German Merchant Navy.  In 1957, while returning to Hamburg from Argentina she got caught in a Hurricane.  The Pamir lost its mainsail in the storm; the cargo, which was not stowed correctly, shifted and caused a dangerous list. Water entered the ship and it quickly capsized without time for the crew to lower the lifeboats. Nearby ships could save only 6 of the 86 crew members.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 20, 2010, 03:35:20 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2010, 01:30:27 AM »
Greece.

Schooner. Kanaris blew up the "Bourlota Saimaz" of admiral Kara-Ali Pasha in 1922. I have been unable to find a description of this vessel, but it was likely a three-decker ship of the line, not a schooner.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 06:21:49 PM by <k> »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2011, 03:52:27 PM »
Here, on a Russian pseudo coin, is the barque Tovarishch, now a German ship, known as the Gorch Fock. It a sister ship of the Sagres III, mentioned above.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2011, 12:51:55 PM »
Madalan

Dimensions 147.6 x 30.2 x14.9ft (draught)
Tonnage: 357 gross. 242 net.
Power: One Cooper-Bessemer 6-cylinder diesel, 300 bhp.

Madalan was built as a yacht in 1928 by Marco U. Martinolich at Lussinpiccole, Italy for an American owner, Mr. Cornelius Crane of Ipswich Ma. She was launched with the name ILLYRIA. Apart from the captain's and crew's quarters she had four double cabins, a library, and a sitting room. Mr. Crane had made his fortune in bathroom fixtures. He made a South Sea expedition for the Field Museum of Natural History of Chicago.

Later, she was owned by George M. Moffett of New York who gave her the name MALAINA.

At the beginning of the second world war, the US Coast Guard bought her for USD 45 000 and spent another USD 44 500 to convert her, equipping her with 2 20mm AA machine guns, 2 depth charge launchers, range finders and gun platforms. She was renamed MADALAN (WYPc-345) and commissioned on 1 April 1943, assigned to the 3rd District based in Fort Tilden, NY. On 7th June 1945, she was decommissioned and transferred to War Shipping Administration.

In November 1946, John B. Pontes, a Boston Cape Verdean businessman, and his business associate Fortunato Gomes da Pina bought her for USD 35 000. Pontes kept the name Madalan, had her re-rigged as a brigantine and had the partitions below deck taken out for optimum cargo space. In 1948, a cattle pen was built under the forecastle in order to have fresh meat during the voyage.

Madalan left Providence on June 8, 1947 under Captain Sebastian Cruz with twenty passengers. It was a crossing with many a windless day. After 74 days, Madalan arrived in Cape Verde. She had a new engine, but Pontes would not allow it to be used because it was too expensive to operate. The return voyage to Providence was a good deal faster, taking only 39 days from Dakar. After staying in for Christmas and New Year she attempted a winter crossing in January 1948 from New England. Five days out of port, Madalan ran into the start of a week of gales that drove her 130 miles a day without sails. Yet apart from the three kerosene drums and a barrel of beef that were washed overboard, the brigantine came through without damage.

The Madalan was back in Providence on July 27, 1948, with forty-two passengers, after making a 48 day crossing from Dakar despite 17 windless days. The comfortable conditions aboard the Madalan had made her a popular ship, and so every year thereafter the Madalan returned to New England in July and left in autumn after the cranberry harvest, when many Cape Verdean cranberry pickers would book passage home to visit family and friends.

Madalan was eventually sold to Antonio Bento of Maio, who neglected her. In 1955 she broke loose in the harbor of Praia and was driven against the rocks. The Providence Journal reported in 1957 that "Antonio Bento can't or won't spend money for necessary repairs on leaks in her steel hull and on her sprung topsail." Sometime later, unattended, she developed a leak and sank.

Peter
 
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 03:01:50 AM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2011, 03:33:21 AM »
Tuvalu, 2 dollars, 2010.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 09:09:03 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2011, 03:57:54 AM »
Belarus.

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2011, 04:10:34 AM »
Preussen. (Prussia). Samoa.

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2011, 05:09:15 AM »
Belarus, 20 Roubles, 2011.  Cutty Sark.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2014, 01:55:22 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2011, 07:30:55 PM »
Belarus. Vespucci.

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2011, 11:46:09 PM »
North Korea. 5 won. 2001.

Krusenstern is a barque, sister ship of Pamir and still sailing. She has no connection with North Korea.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2014, 11:08:54 PM by <k> »

Offline redwine

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2012, 06:20:47 PM »
"Old Spice" advertising token.  Ah, the fragrance of the 70's.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 06:28:00 PM by <k> »
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2012, 04:25:19 PM »
Here is an advertising medal with a charming generic corvette (note the sea gulls.) Mr. Hill was exactly in the business that inspired Gandhi to call for self-sufficiency in India: textile and clothing exports.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2014, 08:12:33 PM »
Pitcairn, $2, 2010, from the official non-circulating set.

HMAV Bounty, re-fitted, armed merchantman.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2014, 12:29:39 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Steel-hulled sailing ships
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2014, 08:13:16 PM »
Niue, 1 dollar, 1996.  The Bounty.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2014, 01:08:18 PM by <k> »