Author Topic: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse  (Read 7312 times)

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Offline Filat

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USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« on: April 29, 2014, 07:54:36 PM »
Given object is recognized as collector's item.
Differently directed offset characters (letters and numbers) The obverse of has the technical and technological logical explanation?
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 04:43:36 AM by Filat »
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Offline Filat

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2014, 09:21:57 AM »
Given object is recognized as collector's item.
Differently directed offset characters (letters and numbers) The obverse of has the technical and technological logical explanation?
Quote:
"In 1955 something unusual happened at the Philadelphia Mint. During the process of preparing the working dies that were to be used for striking Lincoln cents, an error 1955-double-die-lincoln-centoccurred. Working dies are made from steel blanks that receive several impressions from a master die (or hub as it is called). During one of these impressions, a slight (???)misalignment(???) occurred causing the die with Lincoln’s portrait to have a doubling of the numbers and letters. … " → http://coinsite.com/1955-double-die-cent/

What "misalignment" is in question here?
« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 12:06:27 PM by Filat »
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Offline Filat

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2014, 01:08:58 PM »
For information:

"How the Denver Mint Makes Dies to Produce Coins"  → http://www.coinnews.net/2014/01/06/how-the-denver-mint-makes-dies-to-produce-coins/

"Here is a short video that shows the slow squeezing action of the Hubbing Press as it makes a working die" →

« Last Edit: May 01, 2014, 06:50:55 AM by Filat »
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Offline Filat

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2014, 04:50:00 PM »
Quote:
"In 1955 something unusual happened at the Philadelphia Mint. During the process of preparing the working dies that were to be used for striking Lincoln cents, an error 1955-double-die-lincoln-centoccurred. Working dies are made from steel blanks that receive several impressions from a master die (or hub as it is called). During one of these impressions, a slight (???)misalignment(???) occurred causing the die with Lincoln’s portrait to have a doubling of the numbers and letters. … " → http://coinsite.com/1955-double-die-cent/

What "misalignment" is in question here?
Along the way, looking for documentary proof (messages in newspapers, magazines, etc. 1955) phrase: "... the first 1955 Doubled Die cents were found in Massachusetts a few months after their delivery ..."
« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 05:14:01 PM by Filat »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2014, 11:21:11 PM »
Indeed, the explanation is not convincing, because there is no shift in the portrait. Therefore, the error occurred in an earlier stage, when the master was produced. The legend and the portrait were apparently on different hubs. The portrait was transferred correctly. The punch with the letters and date apparently had to be mounted by screwing it in the press. As it was impressed in the master, the punch worked itself loose and rotated (the arrow across the date in Reply #1 is in the wrong direction). The master was used to produce at least one working die.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Filat

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2014, 09:21:26 PM »
In the case of this the subject here there is no error the mint employees at any stage of the manufacture of the "coins" or instruments to its manufacture.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 10:06:39 AM by Filat »
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Offline Filat

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2014, 10:57:07 PM »
Given object is recognized as collector's item.
Differently directed offset characters (letters and numbers) The obverse of has the technical and technological logical explanation?
Another question: Why, as a result of "misalignment" all four digits of the dates have changed in shape?
« Last Edit: December 06, 2014, 11:56:52 PM by Filat »
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Offline Filat

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2015, 02:35:58 PM »
One more question: Why, as a result of "misalignment" four letters changed in thickness?
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2015, 05:33:25 PM »
It looks like an enormous difference, but the area was greatly enlarged. When the punch was properly mounted, it could not move and produced thinner lines. When it was loose and had rotated, the punch moved during the strike, producing slightly thicker characters.

In engineering terms, there are three degrees of liberty: left-right, up-down and back-forward. A mounted punch with one degree of liberty (up-down) will deal with its energetic movement in one direction only. If it has two degrees of liberty, part of the energy of the strike will go into a left-right movement.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline JoeYuk

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Re: USA 1c 1955 Doubled Die Obverse
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2015, 06:39:05 PM »
I seem to recall because of the shape of the die on the first impression central elements are struck fully  and those around the rim slightly less.

With the counter clockwise rotation the second impression would be struck fully at the rim and thus deeper.  This is from memory so I would

need to check to be sure.