Author Topic: Holed Coins  (Read 31845 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Holed Coins
« on: August 02, 2007, 06:43:12 PM »
If I remember correctly, the coin with the biggest hole, relative to its size, is Indian. A couple of feudal Malay coin are pretty holey too, though.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014, 02:37:19 AM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2007, 09:17:19 PM »
Peter, you would have had me with the Mayo. 
If anyone has a Malay Feudal holed coin, I'd love to see one.
richie

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2007, 09:56:53 PM »
Here's an example. This is Kelantan KM 1 (Pridmore 120, Saran Singh Kelantan 1), a Malay feudal state. This is a tin pitis as issued between 1770 and 1882. The tekst is supposed to be Khalifatul Muminin (ruler of the faithful) on both sides, but the spelling leaves to be desired. The coin is about 24 mm, the hole about 11 mm.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2007, 10:09:26 PM »
Peter,Pahang had coins with centre holes in them when it was an independent monarchy under British influence,as did Trengganu when it was under Siamese (Thai) suzerainty.

The main Indian Princely State that issued coins with centre holes was Kutch,especially with the copper 1/8 Kori & 1/2 Kori.There were also 1/16 & 1/4 Kori coins as well with centre holes.

Aidan.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2007, 10:38:33 PM »
I can't scan that quick, Aidan :P

Here's the other extreme. Not in KM or Pridmore, Saran Singh 44A, tin Jokoh, private Chinese token. One day, I hope to get a better copy, but these coins are sooo difficult to find...

Obv: in a pearl circle two heraldic climbing lions, looking like "shield holders" where the shield is the hole. Characters Sin Hee (name of the person who issued the coin. Note how the squarish hole and the four cruciform design elements resemble a Chinese coin.
Rev: in a pearl circle four Chinese characters Tek Sun Kong Si (name of the company). Above, incuse Peng Ngo (1907). This is the smallest central hole in my collection.

The Malay Chinese are called Peranakan. Theirs is an old and complicated culture that mixes Chinese and Malay elements into a blend that keeps surprising. There is a Peranakan museum in Singapore and in Georgetown Malaysia. I am particularly fond of Peranakan food, which blends the Chinese attention to nice looking and varied food with the Malay preference for hot and spicy tastes. Unfortunately, there are very few Peranakan restaurants I know of.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bart

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2007, 11:12:42 AM »
Speaking of coins with really exagerated big holes, I had to think about the British India 1 pice coins. They are more "hole" than "coin".
Here are the scans of the pieces in my collection (KM#532 - small date, small legends and KM#533 - large date, large legends.

bart

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2007, 11:23:03 AM »
Bart,I had forgotten about the Indian 1 Pice coins.There is also the Pakistani pre-decimal 1 Pice coins (1948-52),& some coins from Siam (Thailand).

Cambodia,Laos,& Vietnam also have had coins with holes in the centre as well.There's also the Japanese 5 & 50 Yen coins.

Aidan.

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2007, 06:31:07 PM »
I am so blown away by holes that I changed my avatar. 
Thanks Peter, I loved the Kelantans.  Thanks Bart. And thanks Aidan.
richie

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2007, 07:07:07 PM »
And a FINE avatar it is, Rangnath! It looks like it saved you from a watery death. Bart, those are beauties. For some reason, you can still find them in EF. I once had the opportunity to go through a small batch of them and was amazed at how well conserved they are.

The picture is of one of my prize Indian pieces: KM Tn 2. Valentine assigns it to Bihar (V 43). The piece is 26 mm, the hole 12 mm.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2007, 08:11:06 PM »
That is one great coin!

I read on the web that a million people lost their lives in 1866 in Orissa (South East of Bihar) and 1 12/ million perished in what is now called Rajistan in 1869. Apparantly the British changed their policy in 1874 and averted a famine on that scale ("Government relief in excess of the needs of the people".)

And then I saw this image. 
richie

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2007, 08:43:50 PM »
Go back to Kipling, Richie. He's a Brit who saw and understood. As a former (American) boss liked to say to me: nothing is ever simple and nothing is ever easy. Yes, policy can kill and yes feudalism kills also. And that's neither an excuse for feudalism, nor an excuse for policy, arrogance and ignorance.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2007, 10:47:06 PM »
And a FINE avatar it is, Rangnath! It looks like it saved you from a watery death. Bart, those are beauties. For some reason, you can still find them in EF. I once had the opportunity to go through a small batch of them and was amazed at how well conserved they are.

The picture is of one of my prize Indian pieces: KM Tn 2. Valentine assigns it to Bihar (V 43). The piece is 26 mm, the hole 12 mm.

Peter

Peter,that is a very nice Indian 1 Rupee Famine token.There is also a 1/2 Rupee one,but it is extremely rare.Bihar never issued their own coins.

The Indian 1 Pice coins of the 1940's are known for their varieties in the King's crown at the top of the coin.

The Philippines also have had a coin with a hole in the centre - a 5 Sentimo,which was issued in 2001.

Aidan.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2009, 10:52:49 AM »
Hi all,
A very good thematic collection can be built up with holed coins as theme.Many countries have issued holed coins,but holed coins were more prominent before 1960's.Is anybody here collects holed coins specifically?I do not collect holed coins as a theme,but I do have a small collection of same.
Regards,
Aditya.
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2009, 11:26:49 AM »
Holed coins come in two separate classes. In one class, the holes were made to distinguish the coins from others in the same series. This is the case withe the French and Belgian coins struck between the two world wars. They found that the relative value of bronze and silver was such that they would have to produce a 5 centimes piece that was either a copper monster or a silver microdot. Britain had the same problem with the threepence, but chose to ignore it for a long time, before coming up with a multi-sided brass piece. They experimented with copper-nickel, but found that people were taking the copper-nickel coins for silver, even when the design was completely different (take into account that copper-nickel was a novelty in coinage). Both ended up with copper-nickel holed coins. The problem with these was that they are difficult to design. You have to make a design around the hole. Also, they were costly to produce, as they added a manipulation to the coin producing process that could go dramatically wrong. I may be able to add some pictures of examples here later. When people were used to copper-nickel as an intermediate coin metal, the holed coin designs disappeared.

The other class of holed coins are those that were meant to be worn stringed. Chinese and other Asian cash coins come to mind, but also coins of British and Belgian Africa and New Guinea. These coins have disappeared for the same reason when people started using purses or banknotes.

Holes in coins are centric. There are tokens with ex-centric holes. I am thinking of Dutch gas tokens, that were holed because they were the same size as the 2-1/2 cent pieces, but no longer the same value.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 11:29:01 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

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Re: Holed Coins
« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2009, 09:12:29 PM »
Aditya,
  I only collect those holed coins that come from British Commonwealth countries such as Nigeria,East Africa,British West Africa,Fiji,New Guinea,Rhodesia & Nyasaland,Southern Rhodesia,& Papua New Guinea.

Papua New Guinea still has a 1 Kina coin in circulation,but it is now in nickel-plated steel & a lot smaller in size.I haven't yet got the smaller one,but I do have a couple of the larger ones.

The Principality of Hutt River (or 'Hutt River Province Principality' as it was known prior to 2006) had a commemorative Holey $1 medal-coin that commemorates Queen Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee.I bought one a few years back off a part-time dealer for around NZ$11.

Aidan.