Author Topic: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer  (Read 1102 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2020, 11:36:32 AM »
The coin is dated 1909 and the banknote is dated 1943. How could this then be a coin design taken from a banknote. Looks like a banknote design taken from a coin.





Oh, dear, Henk. Have you never heard of the time machine?  ::)


Yes, you have a point.  :D  I was clearly working too quickly when I posted those particular banknote and coin designs.


How many banknote designs can you identify that were taken from coins? It would be worth a topic.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2020, 11:48:55 AM »
I was wondering about the same thing and too lazy to look up who had it first. It raises another question, though. Might not these symbols that occur on coins and banknotes have started their life outside *shudder* coins and banknotes? That lion taking a walk in front of Mount Kilimanjaro, for instance, might have been used by the Imperial East India Company.

Perhaps the problem is in the title of the thread. "Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer"?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2020, 12:09:00 PM »
Might not these symbols that occur on coins and banknotes have started their life outside *shudder* coins and banknotes? That lion taking a walk in front of Mount Kilimanjaro, for instance, might have been used by the Imperial East India Company.

Lions are very vain animals, and for centuries they had longed to be considered good enough to appear on a banknote. It was Charles Darwin who discovered that they were deliberately evolving in that direction. And as we see, ultimately they did achieve their aim.  ;)

Quote
Perhaps the problem is in the title of the thread. "Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer"?

 ::)  But that is already the title of the thread. Pay attention in class!  >:(
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #18 on: July 08, 2020, 01:47:09 PM »
::)  But that is already the title of the thread. Pay attention in class!  >:(

Impossible with that bleeping and blinking time machine sitting behind you. You should never have been allowed to play with it.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2020, 07:11:43 PM »


A panel on a statue of Queen Victoria in Wellington, New Zealand, showing the signing of the Waitangi treaty.





James Berry's initial idea for the Waitangi crown, 1935.





New Zealand, 10 shillings, 1940 to 1967.





New Zealand's 1990 $1 design by Horst Hahne also depicted the same scene.
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Offline Henk

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2020, 09:55:21 AM »
Classic example: UK Pound note and Pound coin (photos copied from BoE Museum and Royal Mint)

Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2020, 11:06:13 AM »
Was that an unadopted pound note design?
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Offline Henk

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2020, 01:55:25 PM »
No, it was issued and used before and during the 2nd World War

Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2020, 02:38:03 PM »
I see. I couldn't find it on numista.
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Offline Oklahoman

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2020, 09:05:36 PM »
Three notes with the pound design in the above post are on Numista:

P# 363  (1928 to 1948)
P# 367  (1940 to 1948)
P# 369  (1948 to 1960)

Since issue was of the Bank of England, you will not find them Under UK, you would find them under England.

Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2020, 11:07:01 PM »
Thank you. I know of that anomaly (Bank of England notes, legal tender in England and Wales only!) but in my haste didn't think about it.  :-[  So painful, not knowing whether to look for United Kingdom or Great Britain in the first place.  :(
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Offline Henk

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Re: Designs that were used on coins and banknotes from the same issuer
« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2020, 08:35:54 PM »
Another example of identical designs is when a coin is pictured on a (bank)note. Actually this is quite an interesting, and extensive, collecting area. One reason is when because of lack of coins in eg emergencies like wars notes are issued with a picture of a coin on it to indicate their equal value. An example is this Fiji 1942 1 penny note. The coin depicted was not actually issued. The actual 1942 pennies were made in brass instead of the regular copper-nickel and have an S mintmark.This mintmark is missing on the coin depicted on the note.

A second reasen for depicting a coin is as an ornament. The example shown is a Saudi Arabian 1379 (1984) 1 Riyal note depicting a 7th
century gold dinar at left