Coinage of Bahrain

Started by <k>, April 02, 2014, 07:51:27 PM

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<k>

#30
Pearl Monument.jpg

The Pearl Monument.


The reverse of the 500 fils featured the Pearl Monument.

The Pearl Monument was erected in Manama in 1982.

It celebrated the third summit of the Gulf Cooperation Council.

Bahrain hosted the summit for the first time that year.


The Pearl Monument consisted of six dhow "sails" projecting up to the sky.

These came together to hold a pearl at the top.

It symbolised the country's famous history of pearl cultivation.


In 2011 it became the rallying point for anti-government protests.

The monument was destroyed on 18 March 2011 by government forces.

This was part of a crackdown on protesters during the uprising of 2011.


The banks were then required to exchange their 500 fils coins for banknotes.

The 500 fils coin is no longer minted or distributed.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#31
INTRODUCTION OF KUFIC SCRIPT IN 2009




Reverse of an older 50 fils coin with standard script.



Bahrain set-.jpg

Reverses of the 2009 coins with Kufic script.


In 2009 Bahrain changed the script on the reverse of the coins.

The script within the rectangular box was changed to Kufic script.

It is straighter, with fewer curves than the standard script.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

METAL CHANGES OF 2010

From 2010, the 5 and 10 fils were made of brass-plated steel.

Formerly those coins had been minted in brass.

The other coins were left unchanged.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#33
ANALYSIS



Bahrain's coinage.


Originally, Bahrain's coinage had a common reverse design and very plain obverses.

Bahrain's neighbours Kuwait, Oman and Qatar had similarly simplistic designs.


In 1992 Bahrain adopted a thematic design series.

Meanwhile, Kuwait, Oman and Qatar have retained rather simplistic designs.


The current Bahraini design series is not perfect.

The 5 and 10 fils coins feature the same palm tree design.

Two different designs would have been better.


The dhow on the 50 fils is rather simplistic.

It looks like a modern logo.

The ancient seal on the 25 fils also looks simplistic.

But these ancient and modern subjects do not gel well.


The palm tree design is far more detailed.

However, it clashes with those two more simplistic designs.


Overall, these different themes do not gel.

Perhaps it is time for a new design series.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

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Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.