Coinage of Bahrain

Started by <k>, April 02, 2014, 07:51:27 PM

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<k>

#15
Bahrain 5 fils 1992-.jpg

5 fils, 1992.  Obverse.


The 5 fils coin was made of brass.

It was the lowest denomination of the series.

It weighed 2.5 grams and had a diameter of 19 mm.


The legend was now STATE OF BAHRAIN.

It was shown in Arabic and English.


The Islamic and Gregorian years were both shown.

They were now given in European-style numerals.


The obverse design featured a palm tree.

This echoed the common obverse of the previous series.


This palm tree was similar to but different from the previous one.

This is what I call thematic design continuity.

It provides a comforting sense of familiarity and tradition.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain 5 fils 1992-.jpg

5 fils, 1992.  Reverse.


The denomination numeral was shown centrally.

The word fils appeared in Arabic within a rectangular box.

A decorative chain circle enclosed the denomination.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#17


10 fils, 1992.  Obverse.


The 10 fils coin was made of brass.

It weighed 3.35 grams and had a diameter of 21 mm.


Curiously, it had the same obverse design as the 5 fils coin.

They were the only two coins of the series with the same obverse design.

Why could not two different designs have been created?


See:  Circulation sets with duplicate pictorial designs
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain 25 fils 1992.jpg

25 fils, 1992.  Obverse.


The 25 fils coin was made of copper-nickel.

It weighed 3.5 grams and had a diameter of 20 mm.


The obverse design showed a seal from the ancient Dilmun civilisation.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#21
Bahrain 50 fils 1992-.jpg

50 fils, 2005.  Obverse.


The 50 fils coin was made of copper-nickel.

It weighed 4.5 grams and had a diameter of 22 mm.


The obverse design showed a stylised Arab dhow.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#23
Bahrain 100 fils 2001.jpg

100 fils, 2001.  Obverse.


The 100 fils coin was bimetallic.

It had a copper-nickel centre within a brass ring.

It weighed 6 grams and had a diameter of 24 mm.

The obverse showed the coat of arms.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain 500 fils 2000-.jpg

500 fils, 2000.  Obverse.


The 500 fils coin was bimetallic.

It had a brass centre within a copper-nickel ring.

It weighed 9 grams and had a diameter of 27 mm.


The obverse showed the Pearl Monument.

STATE OF BAHRAIN appeared in Arabic and English.


This version was issued in 2000 and 2001 only.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

FROM STATE TO KINGDOM

From Wikipedia:

A popular uprising occurred between 1994 and 2000 in which leftists, liberals and Islamists joined forces. The event resulted in approximately forty deaths and ended after Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa became the Emir of Bahrain in 1999. He instituted elections for parliament, gave women the right to vote, and released all political prisoners. A referendum on 14–15 February 2001 massively supported the National Action Charter. As part of the adoption of the National Action Charter on 14 February 2002, Bahrain changed its formal name from the State of Bahrain to the Kingdom of Bahrain. At the same time, the title of the Head of State, Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa, was changed from Emir to King.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain set.jpg

Kingdom of Bahrain.


Here we see how the current coins look.

They carry the title of KINGDOM OF BAHRAIN.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#29
Bahrain 500 fils 2002.jpg

Bahrain, 500 fils, 2002.


In 2002 an updated version of the 500 fils coin was issued.

It carried the new title of KINGDOM OF BAHRAIN.


This was a one-year issue only.

The coin has not been issued since then.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.