Coinage of Bahrain

Started by <k>, April 02, 2014, 07:51:27 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

Map of the Arabian peninsula.





From Wikipedia:

The Kingdom of Bahrain is a small island country situated near the western shores of the Persian Gulf. It is an archipelago, with Bahrain Island the largest land mass at 55 km (34 mi) long by 18 km (11 mi) wide. Saudi Arabia lies to the west and is connected to Bahrain by the King Fahd Causeway, while Iran lies 200 km (124 mi) to the north across the Persian Gulf. The peninsula of Qatar is to the southeast across the Gulf of Bahrain. The population in 2010 stood at 1,234,571, including 666,172 non-nationals.

Following the withdrawal of the British from the region in the late 1960s, Bahrain declared independence in 1971. Formerly a state, Bahrain was declared a Kingdom in 2002.


Map of Bahrain.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
Flag of Bahrain.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Bahrain introduced its first national coinage in 1965. The Bahraini dinar, which is equal to 1000 fils, replaced the Gulf rupee at a rate of 10 rupees to 1 dinar. The coins, in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 fils. The 1 fils coin was not produced after 1966 and has been demonetised. The obverse of the coins (below) was very plain and showed the denomination and the country name.

The common reverse design of the 1965 coinage featured a date palm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In 1992 a new design series was introduced. The reverse of the coins showed the denomination, within a patterned outer circle.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Here is a closer look at the reverse of the 25 fils.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Since 1992, the brass 5 and 10 fils coins, which are respectively 19mm and 21mm in diameter, have featured a date palm on the obverse.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The obverse of the 25 fils coin depicts a seal from the ancient Dilmun civilisation, which was located on Bahrain.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The obverse of the 50 fils coins features a stylised sailing boat.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8
A bimetallic 100 fils coin was introduced in 1991. The obverse features the Bahraini coat of arms. A new version was issued in 2002, which simply changed the legend from "STATE OF BAHRAIN" to "KINGDOM of BAHRAIN", in keeping with the country's new status.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Pearl Monument, Manama, Bahrain.






Bahrain, 500 fils, 2001.




A bimetallic 500 fils coin was introduced in the year 2000. Above you can see the 2001 issue. The coin also sports an octogonal inner rim on both sides. The final version (below) was issued in 2002. The legend was amended to refer to the Kingdom of Bahrain instead of the State of Bahrain.

The Pearl Monument symbolised the country's natural pearls, an important export product. After the Bahraini uprising of 2011, the government destroyed the monument.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Bahrain, 250 fils, 1969.  FAO issue.




Bahrain has issued a small number of collector coins over the years. The attractive boat and palm scene on the coin above was created for the Royal Mint (UK) by British artist and sculptor Geoffrey Colley.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11
Bahrain, 5 dinars, 1995.  United Nations 50th anniversary commemorative.

The obverse design is by Michael Rizzello and the reverse design was created by Avril Vaughan. Both were British artists and sculptors who produced work for the Royal Mint at various times.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Pabitra

#12
Quote from: <k> on April 02, 2014, 08:04:59 PM
In 1992 a new design series was introduced. The reverse of the coins showed the denomination, within a patterned outer circle.

The series was revised in 2009 with rectangular fonts.
This has not been included in either SCWC or WMK.

Image clipped to be within the limit imposed

<k>



Here is the reverse of the 25 fils of 1992. Yes, the Arabic "fils" within the rectangle is different.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Click on the topic below to see some small images of old and faded (but reasonably attractive) unrealised coin designs for Bahrain:

Bahrain: unrealised designs.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.