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Coinage of Bahrain

Started by <k>, April 02, 2014, 07:51:27 PM

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<k>



Map of the Arabian peninsula.


Bahrain_map.jpg

Map of Bahrain.


From Wikipedia:

The Kingdom of Bahrain is a small island country situated near the western shores of the Persian Gulf. It is an archipelago, with Bahrain Island the largest land mass at 55 km (34 mi) long by 18 km (11 mi) wide. Saudi Arabia lies to the west and is connected to Bahrain by the King Fahd Causeway, while Iran lies 200 km (124 mi) to the north across the Persian Gulf. The peninsula of Qatar is to the southeast across the Gulf of Bahrain. The population in 2010 stood at 1,234,571, including 666,172 non-nationals.

Following the withdrawal of the British from the region in the late 1960s, Bahrain declared independence in 1971. Formerly a state, Bahrain was declared a Kingdom in 2002.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Manama.jpg

Manama, capital city of Bahrain.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

INTRODUCTION OF THE BAHRAINI DINAR

The Bahraini dinar was introduced in 1965.

It replaced the Gulf rupee.

10 Gulf rupees were equal to 1 Bahraini dinar.

The Bahraini dinar is subdivided into 1000 fils.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

FIRST NATIONAL COINAGE

Bahrain introduced its first national coinage in 1965.

The coins were in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 fils.

The 1 fils coin was not produced after 1966 and has been demonetised.


The obverse of the coins showed only the denomination and the country name.

The common reverse design featured a date palm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



1 fils, 1965.  Obverse.


The 1 fils coin was made of bronze.

It weighed 1.5 grams and had a diameter of 15 mm.

It was minted in 1965 and 1966 only.


The Arabic script translates as GOVERNMENT OF BAHRAIN.

The Islamic and Christian era years are shown in Arab-style numerals.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain 1 fils 1965-'.jpg

1 fils, 1965.  Reverse.


The reverse design was very plain.

It showed the denomination numeral.

The word BAHRAIN was shown in Arabic script and in English.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain 5 fils 1965.jpg

5 fils, 1965.  Reverse.


The 5 fils coin was made of bronze.

It weighed 2 grams and had a diameter of 18.5 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain  10 fils 1965-.jpg

10 fils, 1965.  Reverse.


The 10 fils coin was made of bronze.

It weighed 4.75 grams and had a diameter of 23.5 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain 25 fils 1965.jpg

25 fils, 1965.  Obverse.


The 25 fils coin was made of copper-nickel.

It weighed 1.75 grams and had a diameter of 16.5 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain 50 fils 1965-.jpg

50 fils, 1965.  Reverse.


The 50 fils coin was made of copper-nickel.

It weighed 3.1 grams and had a diameter of 20 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Bahrain 100 fils  1965.jpg

100 fils, 1965.  Reverse.


The 100 fils coin was made of copper-nickel.

It weighed 6.5 grams and had a diameter of 25 mm.


It was the highest denomination of the series.

100 fils is one tenth of a dinar.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

NEW COIN SERIES OF 1992

A completely new coin series was issued in 1992.

All the designs were new.

There were also some size and metal changes.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.