Author Topic: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name  (Read 8742 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2014, 09:59:58 PM »


Iran, 100 rials, 1998.

Unsurprisingly, Iran makes no concessions to Westerners.

 
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 02:08:09 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2014, 10:04:10 PM »
The same is true of Afghanistan.  1 Afghani, AH 1383.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2014, 10:08:48 PM »


Pakistan, 2 rupees, 1998. No country name for Europeans, but the denomination and year are intelligible to Westerners.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #18 on: April 01, 2014, 10:35:26 PM »
On to South East Asia next, but I must take another break.

How many countries have their own alphabet? Armenia and Georgia - I'll deal with them last of all. Greece. Ethiopia, I believe. Israel - it never used to give its country name in the Latin alphabet originally, but it does these days.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2014, 11:53:51 PM »




Laos does not use coins these days, but its last circulation coins used only Lao script. Laos has its own alphabet, which is apparently very similar to the Thai alphabet.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 11:13:23 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #20 on: April 01, 2014, 11:57:00 PM »
Thailand, 20 baht, 2013.   Thailand has its own alphabet.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 02:09:39 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2014, 12:01:06 AM »
Cambodia, 500 riels, 1994.

The Khmer syllabary is used on Cambodian circulation coins.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 02:11:30 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2014, 12:14:17 AM »


North Korea currently uses only banknotes, but any circulation coin have always used the Korean alphabet exclusively.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2014, 12:18:00 AM »
South Korea, 100 won, 2002.

Until 1982, South Korea's coins included the English legend "THE BANK OF KOREA", but that is no longer the case.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 07:07:25 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #24 on: April 02, 2014, 12:19:50 AM »


Taiwan's coinage.  Apart from the numerals, no European script is used.

 
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 07:04:54 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2014, 12:22:37 AM »


China's circulation coins include the Latin alphabet, but the country name is not included.

The coinage of Hong Kong and Macao include the territory name in the Latin alphabet.

 
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 07:03:53 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #26 on: April 02, 2014, 12:31:57 AM »
Japan, 10 yen, 2006.  Japanese script with European numerals.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #27 on: April 02, 2014, 12:33:54 AM »


Armenia, 500 dram, 2003.

Armenia has its own national alphabet.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #28 on: April 02, 2014, 12:46:02 AM »


Georgia, common obverse of the 1993 coins.

Georgia has its own alphabet, and the Latin alphabet did not appear on the reverse of the coins.







Georgia issued new 50 tetri and 1 and 2 lari coins in 2006. These did not include any script in the Latin alphabet.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 11:14:58 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #29 on: April 02, 2014, 12:53:01 AM »
This concludes my survey.

Notes:

1] Libya seems to be transitioning to a new design series, which includes the words "CENTRAL BANK OF LIBYA".

2] The circulation sets of Georgia, Syria and Yemen include some coins with the country name in the Latin alphabet and others without it.

3] The countries that do not have coins illustrated here do all include their country name on their coins, and in the Latin alphabet.

Please correct any errors or omissions. I have excluded coins that use the Cyrillic alphabet or variations thereof, as well as Greek coins, since the topic is about coins that do not use European scripts.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2014, 11:48:41 AM by <k> »