Author Topic: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name  (Read 9732 times)

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Offline <k>

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Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« on: April 01, 2014, 06:55:18 PM »
From around the 1400s to the mid-20th century, the growth and predominance of European overseas empires meant that certain languages were used and understood way beyond their native environment. And the modern cultural and economic power of the USA ensures that the English language is used and understood around the world.

As a result, many (ethnically and culturally) non-European countries now include their name in the Latin alphabet on their coins. I am interested in seeing which countries do not - hence this topic.

Of course, not all European countries use the Latin alphabet: the Greeks have their own, and many Slavic countries use the Cyrillic alphabet, as can be seen in this topic: Countries that use the Cyrillic alphabet. I am therefore interested in those modern countries who do not use any European alphabet on their coins.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2014, 07:00:21 PM »
Saudi Arabia, 50 halala, AH 1431. 

Though this coin lacks any script that the average European would understand, it does helpfully include the denomination in Europeanised "Arabic" numerals. This lack of deference to European sensibilities probably reflects the Saudis' confidence in being an economic power (due to their oil wealth), a regional power, and a cultural power - many pilgrims flock to Mecca every year.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2014, 07:05:00 PM »


Oman, 100 baiza, 1984.

The modern Omani coinage follows a similar pattern. However, the numerals are entirely Arabic, but the the Christian calendar year is helpfully included for infidels.  :D

Commemorative coins are an exception, probably because they are marketed to have wide appeal to international collectors, therefore they do include the Latin alphabet. In this topic I am concerned only with circulation coinage, however.

 
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 01:58:19 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2014, 07:11:26 PM »


Yemen, 10 rials, 1993.

Yet another Arab country that shuns European forms is Yemen.





Interestingly, the 20 rials of 2004 does give the denomination and issuing authority in the Latin alphabet. I assume this is a circulation coin - or is it a commemorative?

 
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 01:59:50 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2014, 07:14:26 PM »


Syria, 25 pounds coin, 1996.





An updated version of the coin, incorporating a latent image, was issued in 2003.

Previously the coinage did not cater for European forms. Why the change, I wonder?

 
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 02:00:53 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2014, 07:22:18 PM »
Modern Iraqi coins do not cater for Europeans either.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2014, 07:27:41 PM »
To my knowledge, the other Arab states of West Asia DO include the country name in the Latin alphabet. Next I will check the North African countries.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2014, 09:07:26 PM »


Over to Algeria now: ¼ dinar, 1992.  Fennec fox.

So, we have the year in the Christian calendar, but that is the only sop to Europeans.



Below: Algeria, 5 dinars, 1992.  The denomination numeral appears in a Europeanised form.
 
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 11:11:43 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2014, 09:19:11 PM »
Egypt, 10 piastres, 2008.

The coin shows the Christian year in Arab numerals. No other concessions to Europe. As a country and civilisation that go back to ancient times, this is hardly surprising.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2014, 09:29:28 PM »


Libya is an interesting case. The new ¼ dinar of 2014, to be released soon, includes the legend Central Bank of Libya.

Previously, in Gadaffi's time, this was not the case. See the ¼ dinar of 2009 below.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2014, 09:31:29 PM »


Morocco, 2011.  Dates and denominations to suit the Europeans, but not a country name.

 
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 11:10:32 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2014, 09:34:13 PM »


Same for Tunisia.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2014, 09:38:13 PM »
Ethiopia, 10 cents.  Only the denomination numeral is readily readable by Europeans.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 02:07:02 PM by <k> »
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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2014, 09:49:31 PM »
Quite a few countries do not have Latin alphabets. Prominent among them are Japan, Thailand, Laos, Mogolia, Nepal ( Kingdom era), Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq etc.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinages without a European alphabet country name
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2014, 09:57:39 PM »
Yes, I think the main groupings are some Arab and Muslim states, and some of the South East Asian states.

I've checked the whole of modern Africa now and will move on to the rest of Asia. The Americas, Australasia and the Pacific Islands are all covered by the Latin alphabet without exception.
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