Coinage of the United Arab Emirates

Started by <k>, March 31, 2014, 07:13:17 PM

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<k>



The Abu Dhabi skyline.


The United Arab Emirates are located in the Arabian peninsula and border Oman to the east and Saudi Arabia to the south. The country is a federation of seven emirates (equivalent to principalities). The constituent emirates are Abu Dhabi, Ajman, Dubai, Fujairah, Ras al-Khaimah, Sharjah, and Umm al-Quwain. The capital is Abu Dhabi. The seven hereditary emirs jointly form the Federal Supreme Council, which governs the country. The Emir of Abu Dhabi is traditionally selected as the President, and therefore head of state, of the United Arab Emirates.

The country was established in 1971, after Britain informed the individual sheikhdoms, which were separate British protectorates at the time, that it could no longer afford to defend them. Qatar and Bahrain were invited to join the United Arab Emirates, but declined.
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<k>



The United Arab Emirates and their neighbours.
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<k>

#2

MAP OF THE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES.


KEY TO MAP

1. Abu Dhabi.
2. Ajman.
3. Dubai.
4. Fujairah.
5. Ras al-Khaimah.
6. Sharjah.
7. Umm al-Qawain.
8. Jointly controlled by Ajman and Oman.
9. Jointly controlled by Fujairah and Sharjah.

The population of the UAE is currently estimated at around 9.2 million. Of the seven emirates, Abu Dhabi and Dubai have the highest and second highest populations respectively.
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<k>

#3


The flag of the United Arab Emirates.

It contains the Pan-Arab colors red, green, white, and black.

It was adopted on 2nd December 1971.
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<k>

#4


From Wikipedia:

The emblem of the United Arab Emirates was officially adopted in 1973 and later modified in 2008. It is similar to the coats of arms and emblems of other Arab states.

It consists of a golden falcon (Hawk of Quraish) with a disk in the middle, which shows the UAE flag and seven stars representing the seven Emirates of the federation. The falcon has 7 feathers, which also represent the 7 Emirates. The falcon holds with its talons a red parchment bearing the name of the federation in Kufic script.

Prior to 22nd March 2008, when the emblem was modified, the falcon had a red disk, which showed an Arab sailboat in its interior, surrounded by a chain.
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<k>

From Wikipedia:

The United Arab Emirates dirham was introduced on 19 May 1973. It replaced the Qatar and Dubai riyal at par. The Qatar and Dubai riyal had circulated since 1966 in all of the emirates except Abu Dhabi, where the dirham replaced the Bahraini dinar at a rate of 1 dinar = 10 dirham. Before 1966, all the emirates that were to form the UAE used the Gulf rupee. As in Qatar, the emirates briefly adopted the Saudi riyal during the transition from the Gulf rupee to the Qatar and Dubai riyal.

In 1973, coins were introduced in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25, 50 fils, and 1 dirham. The 1, 5 and 10 fils are struck in bronze, with the higher denominations in cupro-nickel. The fils coins were same size and composition as the corresponding Qatar and Dubai dirham coins.

The name dirham is an Arabic word. Due to centuries of trade and usage of the currency, the dirham survived through the Ottoman Empire. It was formerly the related unit of mass (the Ottoman dram) in the Ottoman Empire and the Sasanian Empire. The name derives from the name of the ancient Greek currency, drachma.
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<k>

#6


OBVERSE DESIGNS OF THE 1973 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES.


The obverse of the coins.

They showed the country name in Arabic and English.

The value and numbers on the coins are written in Eastern Arabic numerals.

The text is in Arabic.
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<k>

#7


The reverse of the 1 fils coin features date palms.


the reverse designs formed a typically modern thematic set.

At that time, that was unusual for an Arab country,

The coins were produced at the Royal Mint.

The designs were the work of English artist Geoffrey Colley.
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<k>

#8


The 5 fils reverse depicts a spangled emperor fish (Lethrinus nebulosus).


The text reads: "Clean oceans produce more food for mankind".
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<k>

#9



A spangled emperor fish (Lethrinus nebulosus). 

The fish has several different common names.
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<k>



The 10 fils reverse features an Arab dhow.
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<k>



An Arab dune gazelle appears on the reverse of the 25 fils.
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<k>



The gazelle has various common names, but its scientific name is Gazella leptoceros.
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<k>

#13



Oil derricks are featured on the 50 fils.

The Arab world is noted for its oil wealth.
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<k>

#14



The 1 dirham coin, the highest denomination,

The reverse design shows an Arab coffee can.
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