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New pound coins in 2017

Started by andyg, March 18, 2014, 11:47:34 PM

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augsburger

Yeah, I suppose you're right, the Olympic 50ps came out in 2010 with 2011 written on them.

I'd suppose that they have to apply to Parliament for the exact specifics of a coin, and then if they decide to change then they have to use the dates that have already been agreed to.

Bimat

If I'm not wrong, Irish Central Bank puts Irish coins (except the commemorative €2 coins) dated X in circulation in year X+1 or X+2. It's a common practice for them.

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Pabitra

I remember one such case was introduction of 10 Rupees bimetallic coins in India about 10-12 years back. The mint started making them but Ministry of Finance had some internal bureaucratic delays. It was only in the next year, the green signal was given. It was then that Reserve Bank of India issued a press release.
As per law in India, the press release marks the beginning of issue of a legal tender.
Therefore, in numismatic circles, the coins minted with previous year dates were declared patterns.

I understand that in United Kingdom, the definition of legal tender has been a bit controversial in recent times.

The coins need not wait for vending machine industry.
EU has coins of 1, 2 and 5 Eurocents, which do not get accepted by most of the vending machines.

Bimat

Quote from: Pabitra on April 01, 2016, 11:40:44 AM
I remember one such case was introduction of 10 Rupees bimetallic coins in India about 10-12 yea s back. The mint started making them but Ministry of Finance had some internal bureaucratic delays. It was only in the next year, the green signal was given. It was then that Reserve Bank of India issued a press release.
As per law in India, the press release marks the beginning of issue of a legal tender.
Therefore, in numismatic circles, the coins minted with previous year dates were declared patterns.

That's correct. Those bimetallics were produced in 2004-2005 but were put into circulation in 2009. I know a person who paid a six digit amount for so called pattern in 2007/2008 which was later available for ₹15-₹20.... :o >:D ;D

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

FosseWay

Quote from: Pabitra on April 01, 2016, 11:40:44 AM
The coins need not wait for vending machine industry.
EU has coins of 1, 2 and 5 Eurocents, which do not get accepted by most of the vending machines.

1c, 2c and 5c coins aren't accepted by vending machines because they are not useful in the context. New £1 coins do need to be accepted from as soon as they become widespread in use - they are fundamental to the public's use of vending machines.

AFAIK there is nothing stopping the Royal Mint either striking coins in 2016 bearing a different date, or not releasing 2016-dated coins until a later point. Both have happened in the past - as Alan mentioned, the decimal coppers were struck, and available in sets, from 1968 onwards but with the date 1971. At the same period, predecimal coins were still struck after 1967 but all with the frozen date 1967 apart from the 1970 proofs.

eurocoin

In the meantime, The Royal Mint has decided to no longer use the term iSIS (Integrated Secure Identification Systems) for their high tech counterfeit security.

eurocoin

#231
While I know there has already been linked to them, I will also add the images of the new 1 pound coin to the topic. The designers initials of David Pearce have now been included on the reverse as well as a latent image on the obverse. The reverse design was enhanced and modelled by Royal Mint artist David Lawrence. The obverse depicts the fifth effigy of Queen Elizabeth II by Jody Clark.

Click on the images for an enlargement. 

     

Pabitra

What happened to micro engraving on the inside edge of the polygonal coin sides which were to ensure that it is most secure coin?

eurocoin

Quote from: Pabitra on April 05, 2016, 04:13:14 PM
What happened to micro engraving on the inside edge of the polygonal coin sides which were to ensure that it is most secure coin?

Indeed interesting to see that the micro engraving has been left out, well spotted! Though it was not only the micro-engraving that made the coin the most secure coin in the world. Micro engraving has already been used on circulating coins of another country (Aruba) for the last decade. It was mainly the combination of security features that made it the most secure coin in the world.

Jostein

Thanks for the pictures Niels...the coin looks almost completely round.  ::)
"Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future" - John F. Kennedy

http://www.bimetallic-coins.com

SandyGuyUK

Quote from: Niels on April 05, 2016, 04:22:44 PM
Indeed interesting to see that the micro engraving has been left out, well spotted! Though it was not only the micro-engraving that made the coin the most secure coin in the world. Micro engraving has already been used on circulating coins of another country (Aruba) for the last decade. It was mainly the combination of security features that made it the most secure coin in the world.
I'm wondering if the micro engraving may still be there but that the edges are more "vertical" than they were originally intended to be.

If you look at the large photos that have now been added to this post, it *does* look like there is some sort of dots on the inside of the rim and I'm wondering if this may be lettering.

What do others think?

Ian
Ian
UK

eurocoin

Quote from: hertfordian on April 05, 2016, 06:16:22 PM
I'm wondering if the micro engraving may still be there but that the edges are more "vertical" than they were originally intended to be.

If you look at the large photos that have now been added to this post, it *does* look like there is some sort of dots on the inside of the rim and I'm wondering if this may be lettering.

What do others think?

Ian

I think you are right but it is indeed very different from the original image.  :o

Pabitra

Yes, nothing is certain till the actual coin is in hand.
An image can never replicate the look and feel of an actual minted piece.

Alan71

They are different types of images so it's difficult to compare, but at present I prefer the 2014 trial version.  The top and bottom of the 2014 one are straight edges rather than points (albeit rounded ones), and the twelve sides are more pronounced.  Making the coin more rounded is a bad idea in my opinion.  Also, I was no fan of the Jody Clark portrait anyway, but this seems to confirm that the Rank-Broadley was by far the superior image and didn't really need changing.

eurocoin

#239
Quote from: Niels on March 24, 2016, 07:39:13 PM
The new 1 pound coins consist of several layers of metal mixed with luminescent particles, so that they can be detected for security purpose.  :)