Author Topic: River Wear Commission Pass  (Read 2433 times)

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Offline Kushi

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River Wear Commission Pass
« on: March 16, 2014, 12:05:26 PM »
This pierced, brass pass for the Sunderland, England, ferries is counterstamped S.S.Co.L. Any ideas? Similar pieces are listed by the Smiths (1981) but with different counterstamps, GBRE 740 GA - GD. Diameter 39 millimeters.

Offline humpybong

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Re: River Wear Commission Pass
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2014, 12:44:50 PM »

Sorry Kushi, can't help you with this one.

Could have been re-used during WWII even though it is not listed.
Barry

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Offline Afrasi

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Re: River Wear Commission Pass
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2014, 02:24:02 PM »
Perhaps Sunderland Shipping Company Limited ?

Online Figleaf

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Re: River Wear Commission Pass
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2014, 02:32:15 PM »
Didn't find a company by that name, but it was close enough to find the Sunderland Shipbuilding Company Limited. Excerpt:
Quote
Sunderland Shipbuilding Company, known locally as The "Limited" Yard, took over a South Docks site where wood ships were built in the eighteen-sixties by John Haswell. Iliff and Mounsey were launching little iron sailing ships and steamers there in the early 'seventies, after which the business was conducted as Mounsey and Foster. This latter firm built several large iron sailing ships from 1873, among them being the Duchess of Edinburgh, Eastern Monarch, Roderick Dhu, Senator and Kingdom of Sweden, each of which was famed among the medium clippers of the period.

After Mounsey retired, Robert Foster continued for only a very short time and then the business passed into the hands of the Sunderland Shipbuilding Company. Commencing about 1882, their record was a splendid one in the steamer class, and included ....."

Later words make it clear that the Sunderland Shipbuilding Company site was on the beach since the text refers to broadside launches into the open sea.

The relation with the Wear River Commission is not so clear. A bridge or ferry pass, perhaps?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: River Wear Commission Pass
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2014, 06:24:46 PM »
I consulted the owner of the site linked to above and got the following reply:

Quote
The token image is familiar to me and is, as I am sure you saw, covered on site here. http://www.searlecanada.org/sunderland/sunderland008.html#sandpoint
River Wear Commissioners ran ferries across the river in Sunderland in north-east England - my page covers a number of such ferries. But what the extra inscription means is a puzzle..

So a ferry pass it is.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.