Author Topic: Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site.  (Read 6050 times)

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Offline redwine

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Re: Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site.
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2018, 01:50:56 PM »
 ;D Yes they're upside down.  Ozzy style 8)
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Offline malj1

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Re: Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site.
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2018, 12:08:50 AM »
Here is an original 19th century token from London Coins, I see they park it up the other way early coin style which is unusual for for tokens where the stars goes to the bottom and also conflicts with the piece in reply #9 where the CCC is upright.

Another replica, this time in pewter is available here
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site.
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2018, 08:32:13 AM »
Now this time we have a contemporary cast fake. The edge says it all.  ::)

Very fishy!
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site.
« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2018, 10:08:40 AM »
Fun! I suppose it is electrotyped, with the two halves filled and pasted together. It may well have been made by a collector, generations ago as a filler.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site.
« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2018, 10:54:08 AM »
I should have added the weight, its only a little underweight at 17.4g and a little smaller at about 35mm.

In hand it has the appearance of a cast fake rather than an electrotype, the tag where the mould was filled is still partly in place.
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Cornish Penny
« Reply #20 on: June 01, 2018, 02:16:12 PM »
Cornish Penny

Cornish pennies wore issued In 1811 & 1812 during a shortage of government coinage as a means of paying the Cornish Miners.
The originals were produced in copper and weighed approximately two thirds of an ounce. They ceased to be legal tender In 1818.
This reproduction from an original coin Is produced at Tolgus Tin in tin of a minimum purity of 95%

  T0LGUS TIN Co. Redruth, Cornwall
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Cornish Penny
« Reply #21 on: June 01, 2018, 02:33:48 PM »
Oh dear. The ugly legal tender hangup. It is debatable if the concept had even been invented in 1812. I would say it was born in 1816. Nevertheless, a fun memento. I am likely to be in the UK in October. That may be an occasion to visit the mine. It looks interesting.

Peter
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Offline malj1

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Re: Cornish Penny
« Reply #22 on: June 01, 2018, 11:34:16 PM »
Upon commencement of the re-coinage in 1816 the Royal Mint was now capable of full-scale production and on 27 July of that year, an Act of Parliament prohibited copper and other tokens, declaring them illegal after 1 January of the following year.

This would be be construed today as not legal tender by the layman.  ::)

A visit the the nearby Poldark mine QV would be worthwhile too. Made famous by the TV series "Poldark"


Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Cornish Penny
« Reply #23 on: June 02, 2018, 08:38:08 AM »
Quite correct, Malcolm. They would construe that as "legal tender", though that's almost a joke. Before 1816, any coin could circulate in a given area, provided it was not severely lightweight and therefore proscribed. The concept of legal tender is the opposite: no coin can circulate in a given area, except if it is mentioned in the law - even though it is severely underweight or in a base metal.

Hadn't thought of Poldark. Thank you.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site.
« Reply #24 on: June 30, 2018, 02:36:03 PM »
I visited the Poldark site a few days back and asked about the tokens. I was told they no longer make them, but they recently found a small remainder of the brass halfpenny token 1735 shown in the first post. I bought an extra copy for the first comer.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Cornish Penny
« Reply #25 on: June 30, 2018, 02:47:18 PM »
I visited the Tolgus Mill compound a few days ago. The token was nowhere in sight, so I asked about it. A long-time employee knew the answer.

Tolgus Mill is basically a large jewellery story (Cornish gold), financially supporting a rudimentary tin mine museum, formerly known as the Tolgus mine. The Tolgus mine, long unproductive, functioned as a partly underground tourist attraction until it closed in 1989. At present, all that remains is a handful of buildings, housing a quite interesting, but badly explained collection of old machines, a number of which working on water power. Everything is above ground. The sketches on the map are a water wheel, transforming water current into a rotating movement, a chimney, representing steam power and a mechanically rotated device facilitating separation of tin particles from sludge.

This means that the token above dates from before 1990.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 30, 2018, 03:13:34 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Cornish Penny
« Reply #26 on: June 30, 2018, 03:10:15 PM »
Useful information about the date of the token.

The price list is interesting in that although dated 1971 it uses pre-decimal prices.
Malcolm
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Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Cornish Penny
« Reply #27 on: July 01, 2018, 03:24:53 AM »

Cornish pennies wore issued In 1811

One of...

Offline malj1

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Re: Cornish Penny
« Reply #28 on: July 01, 2018, 04:27:39 AM »
A really lovely example of a Cornish penny but this unfortunately is the one referred to in this topic Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site.

My example of the Scorrier house type is rather scruffy.
Malcolm
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Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Cornish Penny
« Reply #29 on: July 02, 2018, 01:17:59 AM »
A really lovely example of a Cornish penny but this unfortunately is the one referred to in this topic

Oh. :(

What marks it as a modern replica please Mal?