Author Topic: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West  (Read 17064 times)

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Offline Filat

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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2014, 09:01:30 AM »
Quote:

"Coin Press No. 1 arriving from the San Francisco Mint. Judge Clark J. Guild ( founder of the Nevada State Museum in 1939) is pointing at the press on the front steps of the Museum's entrance. The press was purchased from the U.S. Mint for $225 by the Museum Board. Coin Press No. 1 was the original press sent to the Carson City Mint when it opened in 1870. When minting operations ended in the 1890s it was sent to the Philadelphia Mint in 1899 where it was remodeled to operate by electric power. In 1945 it was sent to the San Francisco Mint and renumbered "5" to correspond with its place in the coining department there. It was returned to Carson City in 1958".

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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2014, 09:16:28 AM »
"Coin Press № 5" Color postcard. 1960s Hal V. Dunn Postcard Collection
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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2014, 09:27:39 AM »
Quote:

"Coin Press #1 at the Nevada State Museum being operated by Don Schmitz, owner of the Nevada City Mint in California. He began operating the Press for the Museum on a limited basis in 1977 and continued until 2001".
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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2014, 09:42:06 AM »
Quote:

"The first coin press arrived at the Carson Mint in 1869 from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was manufactured by Morgan and Orr Iron Founders & Steam Engine Builders, and weighed 12,000 pounds. As was the custom of the day, the coin press was painted with a large number "1" to signify the first press located in the coiners department. On February 11, 1870, Coin Press No. 1 struck the first coin, a Seated Liberty Dollar bearing the soon to be famous "CC" mintmark. The steam powered press could produce 100 coins a minute, over one coin a second".
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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2014, 10:35:03 AM »
Quote:

"Replacement plate affixed to Carson City Mint Press in 1878 when the Virginia & Truckee Railroad Shops repaired the cracked arch. Original plate was Morgan & Orr, Manufactured in Philadelphia Neg 624".
« Last Edit: July 05, 2014, 01:46:16 PM by Filat »
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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2014, 05:44:40 AM »
In the picture:

1. tray for coin blanks;
2. automatic feeding system in the area of coinage blanks (in the figure above shows the better);
3. capacity for coin blanks.
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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2014, 06:16:18 AM »
In the picture:

1. feed pipe billet from the tray area of coinage;
2. automatic feeding system in the area of coinage blanks
« Last Edit: February 13, 2014, 11:06:12 AM by Filat »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2014, 10:51:58 AM »
Coin Press #1 at the Nevada State Museum being operated by Don Schmitz, owner of the Nevada City Mint in California. He began operating the Press for the Museum on a limited basis in 1977 and continued until 2001.

On that picture, his fingers are in great danger.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2014, 07:54:02 AM »
In the picture:

1. feed pipe billet from the tray area of coinage;
2. automatic feeding system in the area of coinage blanks
More precisely:

1. tube - the accumulator with a strictly horizontal  workpieces position.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2014, 08:11:01 AM by Filat »
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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2014, 05:37:18 AM »
The same press at the mint in Mexico (1888).
« Last Edit: February 15, 2014, 06:06:08 AM by Filat »
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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2014, 03:39:22 AM »
Here tube – accumulator has a curved shape.
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Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2014, 04:02:01 AM »
To load the large-diameter coins , there is applied another embodiment of the constructive solutions of the tube.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2014, 04:16:06 AM by Filat »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2014, 05:05:22 PM »
The feeder tube ended a cruel problem: whoever put the blanks in the press (often children) was always in danger of losing fingers. The tube created distance between fingers and press.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Filat

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Re: The Carson City Mint: The Mint of the Wild American West
« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2014, 06:09:39 PM »
Fingers working in the process of minting coins, are safe.
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