Author Topic: Coin database software  (Read 3953 times)

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Offline oldecurb

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Coin database software
« on: January 20, 2014, 06:27:13 AM »
Hi all

is there any software out there that one can use to keep a record of your collection which has a built in value upgrade feature.  I can see a few but it only seems to be USA, Canada and Mexico.  My interests are worldwide and I have an excel spreadsheet for part of my collection but the value becomes outdated after a few years.  I don't really want to go through Krause catalogues to update values.

Thanks in advance

Bruce
Bruce

Offline Bimat

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Offline oldecurb

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Re: Coin database software
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2014, 07:40:07 AM »
Thanks for the links but they don't really answer my question.  Software to automatically update values is what I'm after
Bruce

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin database software
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2014, 12:55:59 AM »
I believe Numismaster (from the publishers of SCWC) has an option to list your "portfolio". I once tried it  and found the process hopelessly laborious. I had a collection of several thousand pieces at the time. However, I seem to remember that there was a connection with the KM data base.

However, I think you may want to ask yourself what you want the information for. I would imagine that it could be useful for insurance purposes, but are you really going to insure it? I can't think of any other valid reason. Even "just for the fun of knowing" is not a very sound reason. Every issue of the KM catalogues states that the price quotes are estimates and that the price you receive or pay can be higher or lower or words to that effect. If the information is not of use to you, why collect and (even more important) maintain it?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline cmerc

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Re: Coin database software
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2014, 02:49:17 AM »
What would be the basis for upgrading the values?  Would they be updated based on some (online) database, e.g., KM, or updated using auction realizations, or manually entered?  I assume all coins are bought using the same currency. 

From my experience trying to develop an online collection cataloging database (in progress), your problem is very challenging unless a small sub-set of coins with well-defined prices is only considered.  To my knowledge, no such software exists. 
Defending this hobby against a disapproving family since 1998.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Coin database software
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2014, 09:21:04 AM »
What would be the basis for upgrading the values?  Would they be updated based on some (online) database, e.g., KM, or updated using auction realizations, or manually.

To my knowledge, no such software exists.

In absence of any other acceptable alternative, the basis would have to be same as the existing mode of getting the quote from reputable dealers. This is being done by SCWC. They only need to be convinced to do it in a database format. The grade of coin, held by the collector, would still remain subjective.

The fact that no such software exists and there is need for such software, should be sufficient to make one.


Offline oldecurb

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Re: Coin database software
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2014, 10:17:00 AM »
I believe Numismaster (from the publishers of SCWC) has an option to list your "portfolio". I once tried it  and found the process hopelessly laborious. I had a collection of several thousand pieces at the time. However, I seem to remember that there was a connection with the KM data base.

However, I think you may want to ask yourself what you want the information for. I would imagine that it could be useful for insurance purposes, but are you really going to insure it? I can't think of any other valid reason. Even "just for the fun of knowing" is not a very sound reason. Every issue of the KM catalogues states that the price quotes are estimates and that the price you receive or pay can be higher or lower or words to that effect. If the information is not of use to you, why collect and (even more important) maintain it?

Peter

There is software that refers back to KM values but only for US, Canada and I think Mexico.  Since I don't believe the world ends after North America I want more!

To answer your second point I like to know the value of what I own.  I know book value and realised value are wildly different but  I still think its nice to know.  That way I'm a lot happier and prouder of coins I find that are worth $50 than ones that are worth 10c.  from what you say it seems that value/mintage etc dont have any bearing for you.  Is that really true?
Bruce

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin database software
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2014, 11:18:54 AM »
Yes, that is really true. I have always collected what other collectors tend to see as second rate at best. When everyone collected Romans or the coins of their own country, I collected foreign modern. When people started to collect foreign modern, I switched to older tokens, mostly copper. Now that older tokens are becoming fashionable, I collect modern tokens, mostly plastic. I wipe my behind with "legal tender", but care a lot about "used as money".

I don't keep records of what I have and I don't care what grade it is in, except when I acquire duplicates: I'll keep the better-looking coins. I have no idea what the difference is between what I pay and catalogue quotes (in many cases, there isn't a catalogue to begin with, let alone a catalogue quote.) I'll record an edge, weight and diameter or the name of the mint or the designer but never the price I paid. My best coins are souvenirs of great friends and their emotional value is far greater than their market value anyway. I break up sets and tear coins out of packaging. I trade proofs for uncs. I don't give a hoot about "complete". I do care about fun. I'll buy a superbly ridiculous forgery, but not a deceptive one (if I can help it), a coin with interesting tampering, but not a fraud, meant to deceive collectors.

That's my style, not yours. You determine your own style. However, before giving yourself a lot of trouble, I wanted to motivate you to think about they "why" of it all. Having done that, it's still your decision.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline oldecurb

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Re: Coin database software
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2014, 11:31:47 AM »
Pataetoe...potahto

Good on you Peter.  If we were all the same what a boring world it would be!!

While you appear to be collect coins until they become fashionable I'm a bit different.  Currently its one coin example for every KM type for every country in the 19th and 20th century plus 18th century (a bit), plus horse coins, plus coins of the Azores (birthplace), plus MTT's ,plus NZ (country of residence), plus nice looking silver coins.  As you can see this will keep me going for a few lifetimes!!

Bruce
Bruce

Offline andyg

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Re: Coin database software
« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2014, 07:56:25 PM »
I believe Numismaster (from the publishers of SCWC) has an option to list your "portfolio". I once tried it  and found the process hopelessly laborious.

I thought about this - but then thought - "do I want to trust someone else with details of what I have?"
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....