Author Topic: A tiny, beautiful coin  (Read 3737 times)

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Offline ghipszky

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A tiny, beautiful coin
« on: December 27, 2013, 01:49:42 AM »
At first I thought this was a crusader cross, but I have no idea of what it is really. I thought at first the creature on the other side was a seal. But the Greeks had many mythological creatures.
The coin is 6mm in width.
Ginger

Offline THCoins

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2013, 10:10:25 AM »
Looks like a Greek Obol for sure. What is portrayed on the obverse; i really have no idea..

Offline ghipszky

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2013, 11:32:33 PM »
OK, I have found a possible answer,
One idea is the cross looking thing is an incuse square quartered diagonally. Coin from Attica, Athens.
Could be a boar from Lesbos, 1-6 stater.
What do you guys think?
Ginger

Online Figleaf

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2013, 10:31:04 AM »
There is no shortage of quadripartite squares on Greek coins. The challenge is to interpret what's on the other side. Here's my proposal: the headless body of a sphinx. The problem is that most sphinxes face the other way.

The coins attached are not of the same type as yours, but an explanation of why I propose a sphinx. If yours is turned around, the triangular part fits better with the Chios coin, but the rectangular part fits less.

My advice would be to buy less coins and in a better grade. In the long run, you will enjoy them more.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline ghipszky

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2013, 02:41:32 AM »
Hi Peter,
Thanks for the advice. I agree, if I get anymore coins they will be like the first one. This little coin was a freebie that Andreas threw in.
I found another creature that I am pretty sure is the creature. It is called a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TelchinesTelekhine, head of a dog and body of a seal. Now to find a coin with that on it.
Peter thanks for finding out what the other thing is on the other side of the coin.
I am also thinking Greek coins are not for me.
Ginger

Online Figleaf

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2013, 11:31:50 AM »
That explains a lot. If it's a freebie he probably couldn't make sense of it himself and wondered if you could. It was meant to encourage you to plow through books on Greek coins. I have an additional idea. Why not see if someone at ANA in Colorado Springs can identify it? While (s)he's at it, look at their Greek coins. If that doesn't motivate you, nothing will. :D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline ghipszky

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2013, 03:05:12 AM »
Peter,
After the way those guys at the ANA treated me a couple of yrs ago, I would not step foot in the place. I will consider this a challenge to learn more.
What do you think of the theory it is the thing with head like a dog and body of a seal? I got this idea when I first saw it. Also, I am listening to Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson and the Battle with the Labyrinth. This creature is mentioned and describes the creature on my coin pretty well. Will keep looking.
Thanks for the challenge!
Ginger

Offline cmerc

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2013, 08:35:53 AM »
After the way those guys at the ANA treated me a couple of yrs ago, I would not step foot in the place.
Please share your (bad?) experience at the ANA, if you don't mind.  I was planning to visit sometime early next year. 
Defending this hobby against a disapproving family since 1998.

Offline ghipszky

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2014, 04:22:30 AM »
CMERC,
About 4 yrs ago I signed up to help identify ancient coins for the local ANA, money museum. I had gone through all the back ground checks, photo taken and ID badge made. I went in the first day and ID'd several coins for them. The volunteer coordinator told me when I was done that he would call in the am with my weeks schedule. He never called. He kept sending back my emails with no replies and finally I called him at the ANA and he said he couldn't talk to me anymore. They appreciated my help but didn't need anyone else. I haven't been back since.
Ginger

Offline cmerc

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2014, 11:42:41 AM »
Sounds like the ANA bureaucracy and/or red tape ruined your opportunity to help out.  Their loss, I guess :P
Defending this hobby against a disapproving family since 1998.

Offline ghipszky

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2014, 01:49:19 AM »
It was very depressing for me. They have some amazing coins there. People are always donating collections from all around the world. Guess that is the way it goes. Love it here on World of Coins, so many great people and coins.
Ginger

Offline ghipszky

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2014, 04:04:20 AM »
But at the same time I would never, ever discourage anyone from going to the museum. The library is absolutely amazing. I used to spend hours in there when I first started in the Roman coins. They have an amazing collection of reference books going back to the 1800's.
Ginger

Offline ghipszky

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2014, 04:11:03 AM »
And I finally have the right attribution for this little coin.

It is:
6mm 0.24g AR Tetartemorion fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phocaea Ionia, Phokaia Greece  Circa 521-478B.C.
obv:head of Griffon, rt.
rev: Quadripartite incuse square

SNG Copenhagen Supp 339; SNG Von Aulock 7938;Rosen 603
CNG: eAuction 170. IONIA, Phokaia. Circa 521-478 BC. AR Tetartemorion (6mm, 0.24 g).(you can click on this link to see the picture of the coin from the auction.(Thanks Aidan Keady) Thanks Peter and everyone else who helped.
Ginger
« Last Edit: January 09, 2014, 01:42:35 AM by ghipszky »

Online Figleaf

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2014, 11:42:51 AM »
Pretty brilliant id. If it is any comfort, the coin on Wildwinds is more worn than yours. There is a better similar coin further down that gives you an impression of how it was supposed to look. Enjoy!

Peter

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline ghipszky

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Re: A tiny, beautiful coin
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2014, 01:40:23 AM »
Thanks Peter. Not bad for free.
Ginger