Author Topic: Treasury of Indian Coins  (Read 1572 times)

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Offline Salvete

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Treasury of Indian Coins
« on: October 11, 2010, 10:16:48 AM »
Some years ago I came across a 'coffee table' book in large format called 'A Treasury of Indian Coins' edited by Martha Carter for Marg Publications (pub. 1994) with a mouth-watering selection of gorgeous photos of Indian coins.  Hardly a researcher's book, but inspiring in other ways.  THAT is how Indian coin photos should be presented.

Salvete
Ultimately, our coins are only comprehensible against the background of their historical context.

akona20

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Re: Treasury of Indian Coins
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2010, 10:50:42 AM »
I have seen that book. Amazing photography.

For those who take the time to look the artistry of the engravers is breath taking.

Offline Salvete

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Re: Treasury of Indian Coins
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2010, 11:09:22 AM »
Quite so, Akona,

Wouldn't we all love the chance of presenting A1, top class photos of our favourite coins for the delectation of those both deeply and only  marginally interested in  seeing them - and even to make a few royalties on the side ......

That's a book I would have fallen for if I'd seen it. I am guilty of having several such books with dazzling pictures. For the record, that book is Bombay 1994, ASIN B001KLZ2F6.

BTW thanks for the book number reference, Peter.  I expect the book is available second-hand for next to nothing, by now.

While we are on the subject of marginally applicable coffee table books, I picked up one at a book fair in Nagpur, called 'The Royal Palaces of India' by G Michell and A Martinelli, Thames and Hudson, London, 1994.  Some wonderful pictures and a bit of entertaining history.  Again, not to be bought for the history, which is not detailed, but for those marvellous photos.  One of the Meerangarh at Jodhpur,  taken from a neighbouring hill, is spectacular.  Taken before Jodhpur was painted blue, so that it could advertise itself to tourists as 'the blue city'!  Rajasthan, naturally is well covered.

Salvete
« Last Edit: December 25, 2013, 06:33:41 PM by Figleaf »
Ultimately, our coins are only comprehensible against the background of their historical context.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Treasury of Indian Coins
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2013, 05:59:20 PM »
Added this book to my library today. It's better than I thought it would be. Yes, the photographs are out of this world. However, the texts are quite worthwhile as well. Neither a history of Indian ancient and medieval coins nor a catalogue, but a series of knowledgeable overviews written by experts and edited to make the whole an utterly readable experience.

The book made me deeply respectful of our membership. PeaceBD's pictures are as good as any in this book, I was largely familiar with the coins illustrated without having collected or studied them, the coins shown (many of them from the ANS collection) are as good as those of our members - in fact, some are from Oesho's collection! If you enjoy beauty in general and coins in particular, this book won't disappoint you.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline THCoins

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Re: Treasury of Indian Coins
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2013, 12:57:56 PM »
Very good to see you also gave yourself some Cristmas treats this year !

Offline mitresh

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Re: Treasury of Indian Coins
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2013, 08:08:42 AM »
Superb book. I'm also looking for this edition.
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