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Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage

Started by <k>, November 23, 2013, 10:16:32 PM

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<k>

Slovenia 50 stotinov 1996 (2).jpg


The 50 stotinov coin was also made of aluminium-magnesium.

Above you see the obverse design of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#16



The reverse design of the 50 stotinov coin featured a bee.

The Carniolan honey bee (Apis mellifera carnica, Pollmann) is a subspecies of the western honey bee.

It is native to Slovenia and other parts of central and Eastern Europe.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

UNIT AND SUBUNIT COINS.

The subunit coins of - the stotinov denominations - were all made of aluminium-magnesium.

Their obverse featured the denomination numerals within a central recessed square.


The tolar coins were all made of nickel-brass.

Their obverse featured the denomination numerals within a central recessed circle.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The reverse design of the 1 tolar coin.

It featured a brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) and two smaller trout.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

brown trout.jpg

The brown trout.


The brown trout (Salmo trutta) is a European species of salmonid fish that has been widely introduced into suitable environments globally.

The native range of brown trout extends from northern Norway and White Sea tributaries in Russia in the Arctic Ocean to the Atlas Mountains in North Africa. The western limit of their native range is Iceland in the north Atlantic, while the eastern limit is in Aral Sea tributaries in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The reverse design of the 2 tolarja coin featured the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica).


The animal names are all given in the Latin scientific form in this series.

Their common Slovenian names are not used.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Barn swallow.jpg


The barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) is the most widespread species of swallow in the world. It appears to have the largest natural distribution of any of the world's passerines, ranging over 251 million square kilometres globally. It is a distinctive passerine bird with blue upperparts and a long, deeply forked tail. It is found in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

Sometimes known as perching birds, passerines are distinguished from other orders of birds by the arrangement of their toes (three pointing forward and one back), which facilitates perching.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Slovenia 5 tolar.jpg


The obverse of the 5 tolarjev coin.

This coin was the highest denomination issued in 1992.

Higher denominations were not issued until the 21st century.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The reverse design of the 5 tolarjev coin featured an Alpine Ibex (Capra ibex).


See also:  Slovenia: mark under goat's neck on 5 tolar coin design.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Alpine ibex.jpg


The Alpine ibex is a species of wild goat that lives in the mountains of the European Alps.

Alpine ibex tend to live in steep, rough terrain near the snow line.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Slovenia 10 tolar 2004.jpg


In the year 2000 Slovenia added a new denomination to the series.

It was a 10 tolarjev coin.


This was the first copper-nickel coin of the series.

However, the design of the obverse was similar to the other tolar coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Slovenia 10 tolar.jpg


The reverse design featured a wonderfully expressionistic horse.

The legend included the Latin for horse: EQUUS.


To the right of the horse, the number 10 was shown in Braille.

This was the only coin of the series that featured braille.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Slovenia 20 tolar 2004.jpg


In 2003 Slovenia issued two new high denomination coins: 20 and 50 tolarjev.

These coins, like the 10 tolarjev, were made of copper-nickel.


Above you see the obverse of the 20 tolarjev coin.


Notice that the year now appeared in a different position.

It followed the curve of the bottom of the inner circle.

It was accordingly upside-down.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.