British Co-op tokens denominated in money

Started by africancoins, September 28, 2010, 12:09:36 AM

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malj1

Much more likely to have been known as a half sovereign until WW1 when with the advent of the ten shilling note and withdrawal of gold in 1914 which which would have soon changed the language.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

redwine

Quote from: Figleaf on June 20, 2016, 12:13:57 AM
Do you know other bracteate type tokens from Ardill? Or is there documentary evidence they had the hardware to make them? The ones with an identified maker I have seen seem to come from Neal, but I won't claim I have seen all of them.

Peter

Rains cites an order to Ardill (October 1879) for 1d, 3d and 6d pieces. 
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

malj1

Here is my set of Guide Post co-op tokens:

    penny 21.9mm
    threepence, 21.9mm.
    sixpence, 21.9mm.
    shilling, 25.4mm.
    two shillings 26.5mm
    five shillings, 28.8mm.
    half sovereign, brass 19.3mm
    one pound, bronze 22.3mm

The five shillings can be seen clearly as tinned iron while the others are the same with a thin coating of rust.

The two high values are marked Ardill Leeds.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Figleaf

Good stuff, gentlemen. With Redwine's info and the picture of the half sov and the pound, we can safely assume Ardill is correct for all. Thank you.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

Copper, 22.3 mm, 4 gram. A very welcome return of UK co-op tokens to my collection. I don't have the Rains book. Does this one have a catalogue number?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

FosseWay

London CSL 2 in Rains.

There is also a round, tinned iron bracteate 6d and another hexagonal bronze one with the date 1964 on one side (these are numbers 1 and 3 respectively).

No. 2 exists in both 0 and 180 degree rotation (this isn't from Rains, but from looking at mine).

Figleaf

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

ZYV

Above in the theme is «£2 that's very odd».
«Target on the reverse» is letter O.

And here is «more odder» piece with letter M and individual stamped number (!).

3.01 g, 25.9 мм.

What can be said about it, if you please?
My publications on numismatics and history of Golden Horde  https://independent.academia.edu/ZayonchkovskyYuru

Figleaf

The Royal Arsenal Cooperative Society was perhaps the largest co-op in Britain. They had several shops in what is now the Greater London area. My guess is that the letters were to distinguish these shops.

As for the number, it was evidently punched in later. It may be a membership card number. If so, Royal Arsenal would not have been pleased to be unable to be unable to re-cycle the token.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.