Author Topic: Sikh Temple Token: Guru Nanak, 1804  (Read 2307 times)

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Offline mitresh

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Sikh Temple Token: Guru Nanak, 1804
« on: November 02, 2013, 05:24:31 AM »
Sikh Temple Token, Punjab, Alloyed Copper, VS 1804 (AD 1747), 10.7g

Obv: Nimbate Guru Nanak Ji (the First Sikh Guru and founder of the Sikhism faith) seated with sword hanging from waist, "SAT KARTAR" written in Nagari on top on either side of the halo'ed head, VS date 1804 written in Nagari script in exergue, a peacock sitting on a friezed balcony to the left with plumed feathers hanging down.

Rev: Guru Nanak Ji sitting below a tree, water-pot (kamandla) and a pair of 'Khadau' (wooden slippers) in front, flanked by Bhai Mardana to the left playing the 'rabab' (string instrument) and Bhai Bala to the left holding a 'chowrie' (fly whisk).

The token depicts the founder of the Sikh faith, Guru Nanak (AD 1469-1539). Guru Nanak taught his followers to have faith in the one true God and encouraged them to worship and recite the name of God.

On the Obverse it shows Guruji sitting alone. On top is written SAT KARTAR meaning Only the name of the Lord (Kartar) is True.

On the reverse of the token he is shown seated under a tree between two of his companions. Bhai Mardana, a Muslim, is seated on the left playing a rabab (stringed musical instrument) whilst Bhai Bala, a Hindu, is on the right holding a chowri (fly-whisk). The principle of equality of men, promoted by Guru Nanak throughout his life, is represented by showing members of the different faiths sitting together.

There is also a belief that the single figure on Obverse depicts Guru Govind Singh (the 10th and last Sikh Guru) due to the presence of the sword hanging from the waist and halo around the head. Guru Govind Singh died in 1708 AD hence this token (dated VS 1804 or AD 1747) would then seem to logically commemorate the first and last Sikh Guru.
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Offline mitresh

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Re: Sikh Temple Token: Guru Nanak, 1804
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2013, 09:23:54 AM »
I have no way of knowing whether this is original or a contemporary imitation.
In the quest for Excellence, there's no finish line.

Offline saro

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Re: Sikh Temple Token: Guru Nanak, 1804
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2018, 02:38:03 PM »
I have no way of knowing whether this is original or a contemporary imitation.

Dear Mitresh,
Your token is the type SS1 listed by Saran Singh & Dalwinder Singh in their paper titled " Sikh Religious Tokens of India"
same weight & metal / no doubt it is an original Sikh token.
You can see the article here

Did you notice my fast reply ! :D / (nov. 2013...)
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Sikh Temple Token: Guru Nanak, 1804
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2018, 04:56:22 PM »
Mieux tard que jamais. It is amazing how much fun you can squeeze out of old threads and additional information is always welcome.

Small technical note. A person called Saran Singh (perhaps the same guy) wrote The coins of Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei and claimed SS numbers in that work. To avoid confusion, it may be better not to use the same letter combinations for another book.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline mitresh

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Re: Sikh Temple Token: Guru Nanak, 1804
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2018, 05:59:57 PM »
Thanks Bernard. I'll check out the reference you mention. Not to worry about slow/fast timeline for response, fun is collecting and exploring together, and sharing information.

Agreed Peter re: using separate Ref No's.
In the quest for Excellence, there's no finish line.