Author Topic: Polish euro coins  (Read 11030 times)

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Offline zarazek

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Polish euro coins
« on: November 16, 2008, 01:34:35 AM »
Here are some examples of Polish euro coin designs created by our friend annovi.frizio. I asked him to make them based on my ideas, which included three themes: nature, famous Poles and symbols of Poland.

How do you find these coins? I personally would love to see them (or something similar) on our coins in the future.










Offline Figleaf

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2008, 10:16:44 AM »
I think the series as a whole works very well. Frizio's experience is clearly visible. The portraits are charming little studies in style, with well chosen subjects. The building strikes me as very "socialist", but there's no point in denying the country's past. However, in my opinion the fish is tops. The curves of he fish harmonize beautifully with every other design element. This is coin designing at its best.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 16, 2008, 02:19:53 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2008, 01:41:16 PM »
Design wise, I like them all. The fish looks great indeed. The stork - well, Slovenia has one too, but at least the position would be different. The bison (?) is fine too.

As for "people", Chopin would certainly be a good choice. Note however that, on the Polish coins commemorating him, his name is spelled Chopin. The Kopernik portrait I don't like that much, but he would be good on Polish circulation coins.

As for Sklodowska-Curie, don't know how that portrait would look on an actual coin. Also, I would like to see Mickiewicz in such a series too. But who do we leave out for him? ;)

Now that culture palace in Warsaw ... I am not Polish, so I have to ask: Would people really like to see that thing on a coin which they use every day?

The Polish eagle looks good too. But I have another question: On Polish coins issued so far, you always find the complete country name (Rzeczpospolita Polska). Wouldn't a mere "Polska" be too short?

Christian

Offline a3v1

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2008, 02:19:24 PM »
@ Christian,
The buffalo on the 5 cent design probably is not an (American) bison, but his European cousin, a wisent (aurochs).
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Offline annovi.frizio

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2008, 04:22:38 PM »
thank you, :-)
Frizio Graphic Designer
http://www.friziodesign.it/
..............................................................

Offline chrisild

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2008, 06:44:25 PM »

The buffalo on the 5 cent design probably is not an (American) bison, but his European cousin, a wisent (aurochs).
Ah yes, right. Would be a nice piece to have, and it would go along well with another coin - same denomination, same animal (sort of), different continent - that I have in my collection. ;)

Christian

Offline zarazek

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2008, 09:41:36 PM »
I love the designs with the European bison and the stork, I think they really are symbols of Poland. While the wisent had become extinct in all of Europe, it survived in Poland and is now being reintroduced in other countries.
The Palace of Culture and Science is, in my opinion, the most controversial and I have already read comments on a Polish numismatic forum rejecting this idea.
I'm just hoping Poland won't repeat the mistakes of Ireland, Lithuania, Latvia and probably Bulgaria and choose one design for all denominations. I would also hate to see JPII or Wałęsa on the coins!

Do you think I could show these designs to someone who will be resposible for choosing designs of future Polish euro coins to influence their decision? :)
« Last Edit: November 16, 2008, 09:44:25 PM by Farfett il-Lejl »

translateltd

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2008, 07:34:15 AM »
I think this is a nice series of designs, too, though my preference would be for the people over the animals, just to be contrary :-)

If we were adding more "famous Poles I would like to see" to the list, I would vote for Dr Zamenhof (1859-1917) ...




BC Numismatics

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Polish Euro coins.
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2008, 07:47:11 AM »
Martin,
  I can guess that you are referring to Dr. Ludvik Zamenhof,as in the creator of that very artificial language that is called Esperanto,which no-one speaks as a native language.

Aidan.

translateltd

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Re: Polish Euro coins.
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2008, 08:42:22 AM »
Martin,
  I can guess that you are referring to Dr. Ludvik Zamenhof,as in the creator of that very artificial language that is called Esperanto,which no-one speaks as a native language.
Aidan.

These are common prejudices with little grounding in truth any more.  It may have started out as you describe, but it has grown into a functioning language community in the past 120 years, with quite a number of speakers from birth.  It's a minority language in its own right now, the only difference being that its speaker base is spread worldwide rather than localised. 

Dr Zamenhof has already featured on one Polish NCLT issue, the 100 zlotych of 1979 (KM103), as well as numerous private patterns, the most common ones seen being those for the "Universal League" struck by the Utrecht mint in 1960 (dated 1959) and 1965.


Offline chrisild

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Re: Polish Euro coins.
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2008, 11:56:21 AM »
the most common ones seen being those for the "Universal League" struck by the Utrecht mint in 1960 (dated 1959) and 1965.
Found'em ...
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/72/1_5_10StelojBildFlanko.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/13/1_5_10StelojKapflanko.jpg

Now whether Zamenhof should be one of three personalities depicted on circulation coins, I don't know. But a zloty commem next year would be fine ...

Christian

translateltd

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Re: Polish Euro coins.
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2008, 06:46:07 PM »
Found'em ...
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/72/1_5_10StelojBildFlanko.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/13/1_5_10StelojKapflanko.jpg

Now whether Zamenhof should be one of three personalities depicted on circulation coins, I don't know. But a zloty commem next year would be fine ...

Christian

Yes, I'd forgotten about his upcoming 150th anniversary - that would be a good opportunity for a commemorative indeed.  I have a large Polish medal dated 1959 (for obvious reasons) with his portrait, too.  By the way, if anyone has the nickel version of the Universal League 25 steloj (I have the silver one already), I'd be interested!


Offline Afrasi

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2013, 02:36:22 PM »
The three famous Poles at top will cover the usual scheme. To me personally the greatest Pole was Janusz Korczak.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janusz_Korczak

Offline chrisild

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Re: Polish euro coins
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2013, 05:09:52 PM »
The Copernicus portrait is fine in my opinion. Except for the lips maybe; too much emphasis on them. :)

In 1973 (for the 500th anniversary of his birth) several countries issued commems - the Federal Republic of Germany did not use a portrait but a depiction of the Solar System. The Polish coin issued on the same occasion has a somewhat abstract but IMO good portrait. Links only as these would be off-topic here.

Copernicus would be good for another reason: He suggested a coinage reform http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monetae_cudendae_ratio in the early 16th century ...



Christian
« Last Edit: November 12, 2013, 07:03:52 PM by chrisild »