Author Topic: Lithuania & Poland: Sigismund II Augustus (1548-1572) ½ Gross (Gumowski-598)  (Read 4250 times)

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Offline Quant.Geek

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Lithuania & Poland: Sigismund II Augustus (1548-1572) ½ Gross (Gumowski-598)

Obv: Knight on horseback with date below (National Arms of Lithuania); Legend around - MONETA MAGNI DVCAT LITVA
Rev: Eagle (National Arms of Poland); Legend around - SIGIS AVG REX PO MAG DVX LI

« Last Edit: February 16, 2014, 07:24:50 PM by Quant.Geek »
A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins

Offline Figleaf

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Extraordinary nice coin. The legends on the coin say Lithuania, though the grand duke's titles include Poland.

obv: spread eagle in circle, head breaking through, SIGISmund AVGvstvs REX POloniae MAGnae DUX LItuaniae - Sigismund August, king of Poland, grand duke of Lithuania
rev: Vytis with sword and shield on horseback above date in circle, hoofs breaking through, MONETA MAGNI DVCATvs LITVAniae - Coin of the grand duchy of Lithuania

Wondering about the lazy 9 after DVCAT…

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline davidrj

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I like these - two from my small collection

Alexander Jagellion 1492-1506 half grosz



and Sigismund I 1509 half grosz (my earliest dated coin)



The dynamics of the knights on horseback is in stark contrast to earlier medieval design, this Vytis motif is still in use on current Lithuanian coins

David
« Last Edit: June 03, 2014, 08:26:10 PM by Quant.Geek »

Offline Figleaf

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I tried to read the legends. Here's the fruit of my inspiration...

+ALEXANDRI. MON'eta (edited for remarks below)
+MAGNI°DVC'atis°LITVANIE

and

+MONETA:SIGISMVNDI:1509
+M(AGNI:DVC'at)IS:LITVANIE

Letters in brackets are guesses. Lower case characters are inferred, but not in the coin and (on these coins) represented by '.

The letters are elegantly and consistently formed and the spelling looks accurate.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 03, 2014, 05:30:00 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline davidrj

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Very impressed with your calligraphic skills Peter, do you draw the letters on screen?

David

Offline Quant.Geek

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The unification of Poland & Lithuania proved to be a formidable enemy for the Teutonic Knights resulting in the brutal defeat in the Battle of Grunwald.  Most of the Teutonic Knights leadership was either killed or captured.  The battle is captured beautifully by the artist Jan Matejko.  Peter's attributions are mostly correct (kudos for coming up with the legends without an authoritative book).  Here are the attributions based on Монеты Великого княжества Литовского (1492-1707) by В.И.Какареко and И.Н.Шталенков (Coins of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (1492-1707)):

Alexander Jagellion 1492-1506 half grosz

Obv: MON' - °ALEXANDRI°
Rev: MAGNI°DVC'°LITVANIE ✠

Sigismund I 1509 half grosz

Obv: MONETA:SIGISMVNDI:1509 ✠
Rev: MAGNI:DVCIS:LITVANIE ✠


Click to enlarge the painting to see the full details:

« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 11:12:24 AM by eurocoin »
A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins

Offline Figleaf

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"MONeta" makes sense. Thank you QG.

Using a Mac with Graphic Converter. I draw the letters by hand with the mouse on your high resolution pictures, then make them smaller, so the shakes and other small errors are not so visible. I use a four pixel wide "pen", as I want to give only the skeleton of the letters. If I should cover them completely, the third dimension is lost. When exercising my drawing "skills" I don't get far beyond stick men, so anyone can do it if they have some experience with the shape of Gothic letters as used on European coins.

The idea for this technique is based on what a number of members (in particular Overlord, Ansari and saro) do to explain Indian coins. I don't have their ability, but I think it may be useful for the uninitiated to read Gothic legends with less difficulty.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline davidrj

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 :)

David