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Braille coins

Started by tbabinszki, August 24, 2013, 07:09:46 PM

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tbabinszki

Hi,

I'm trying to create a collection of all Braille coins.
I already have some, and have also checked on numista.com. I was wondering if anybody is aware of anything else. My list is below, I have marked the ones I already have.
*United States Alabama Quarter
*United States 1 Dollar 2009 commemorative
India *2, 100 Rupees, 2009
*Italy 2 Euros, 2009
*Belgium 2 Euros, 2009
*Italy 500 Lira
Peru 1 Centimo KM#303
Peru 5 Centimos KM#304
Peru 10 Centimos KM#305
Peru 20 Centimos KM#306.2
*Peru 50 Centimos KM#307.1
*Peru 1 Nuevo Sol KM#308.3
Costa Rica 1, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, 100, 500  Colons, several types
Isle of Man 1 Crown, 1981 commemorative
Mexico 10 Pesos KM#512
Mexico 20 Pesos km#508
Mexico 50 Pesos KM#495
Mexico 100 Pesos KM#493
Slovenia 10 Tolarjev KM#46

Thank you:

Tom


paisepagal

Thailand 10 Baht... The standard circulation coin

chrisild

#2
Hmm, that US silver dollar can hardly be called a circulation piece. ;)  In terms of collector coins, there is also the French piece from 1999, issued for the 190th anniversary (!) of Braille's birth. 100 francs silver, and 500 francs gold, same design. But the mintages were relatively low; 3000 silver and 300 gold pieces. Both seem to be quite expensive these days.

Christian

Figleaf

That Isle of Man crown doesn't circulate either, but it shouldn't be too expensive.

@tbabinszki: What is the meaning of the asterisks? Do you have or want these coins? It would be interesting to hear about your experience with the braille on the coins. I suspect that on at least some of them, the braille would be too low profile to be of practical use.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

paisepagal

I didn't notice the alderney coin.....i,just assumed the US braille $1 to be the exception. In that case, there is a 10zl from Poland and a 200korun from Czech rep (or it maybe Slovakia)

I can see that Tom has meant the asterisk to indicate he already has the coin 

chrisild

Yes, that is how I read it too. As for the size of the Braille characters, I remember that, when I first learned about that Italian 500 lire coin which had those raised dots, I thought, neat, blind people can read the denomination this way. Later I "discovered" that (and today I am tempted to add an "of course") it would not work with such tiny characters ...

The 200 korun denomination does not ring a bell here, but the Polish coin is this one. Actually two were issued in 2011, a 2 zł coin and a 10 zł silver piece, both about "Europe without Barriers". But only the silver coin has Braille characters. http://nbp.pl/en/banknoty/kolekcjonerskie/2011/2011_11b___EUROPA_bez_barier_en.pdf

Here is an image of the French coin that I mentioned before: http://images3.numishop.eu/images/moderne/fmd_180077.jpg

Christian


chrisild

Ah yes ... except it was apparently moved to the rejected-one-of-a-kind topic. :)  But this way I came across another piece:

Bhutan 200 ngultrum 1981 - Blind man using a typewriter
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,13519.msg122112.html#msg122112

And this is the one you mentioned. Czech Rep 200 korun 2013 - Aloys Klar
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,13519.msg143140.html#msg143140

Christian

tbabinszki

Thank you for all the responses.
Originally I started researching the circulation coins, as this is what I collect, but this topic got me interested so much  along the way that I will probably make an exception and will try to get all commemoratives as well.
I do own the Braille Dollar, but that one is much more than a collection item.

One may wonder why are there such small braille dots on the coins if blind people can't read it. As much as I understand, it had nothing to do with providing blind people with readable coins. For that matter, coins are one of those few things, especially if you only look at one given country that blind people can easily identify. Ok, exceptions apply, consider US quarter and US Dollar for example. It is pretty easy to pay with the wrong one when you are in a hurry, have diabetes, etc.

The main reason for the braille dots is probably awareness. But the more I read about braille coins, the less I seem to know...

Tom


dheer

There also seems to be a commemorative issued by Palau

Palau - 2009 - 5 Dollars - 200th Ann. Louis Braille

Year: 2009
Face value: 5 Dollars
Metal: Silver .925
Weight: 25 g
Diameter: 38.61 mm
Quality: BU
Mintage: 2'500 pcs. [Mintage figures are not verified]

http://coinsofrepublicindia.blogspot.in
A guide on Republic India Coins & Currencies

dheer

If you are expanding the theme to include coins on Blind theme, then we can also have the following;

Luxembourg - Franc
20 Francs - Charlotte (John the Blind)
(1946)
Commemorative: 600th Anniversary - John the Blind
Silver (.835) – 8.5 g – ø 27 mm
KM# 47

50 Francs - Charlotte (John the Blind)
(1946)
Commemorative: 600th Anniversary - John the Blind
Silver (.835) – 12.5 g – ø 31 mm
KM# 48

100 Francs - Charlotte (John the Blind)
(1946)
Commemorative: 600th Anniversary - John the Blind
Silver (.835) – 25 g – ø 37 mm
KM# 49


Poland
2 Złote (Europe with no limits)
2011
Commemorative: 100th Anniversary of Society for the Protection of the Blind
Nordic Gold (Cu 89%, Al 5%, Zn 5%, Sn 1%) – 8.15 g – ø 27 mm
Y# 795

Russia - Ruble
50 Roubles (Blind Mole Rat)
1994
Aluminium-bronze center in Copper-nickel ring – 5.95 g – ø 25 mm
Y# 367



http://coinsofrepublicindia.blogspot.in
A guide on Republic India Coins & Currencies

dheer

A post on numista on similar theme, though it might be of interest to you.

http://en.numista.com/forum/topic9299.html


http://coinsofrepublicindia.blogspot.in
A guide on Republic India Coins & Currencies

dheer

Another Silver commemorative from United States. Not sure if this fits into your theme.

1995 Paralympics Blind Runner Silver Dollar / Olympic Paralympic Commemorative US silver dollar

The 1995 Paralympics Silver Dollar was issued together with eight other silver dollars and eight other gold and clad coins to commemorate the Atlanta, Georgia XXVI Olympiad Summer Games. This silver dollar features a blind runner and is sometimes referred to as the 1995 Blind Runner Silver Dollar.

The obverse of the coin features a blind runner tethered to his seeing companion during a race. This was designed by James C. Sharpe and modeled by Thomas D. Rogers. The inscriptions read "Triumph of the Human Spirit", "Paralympics", "In God We Trust", "Liberty" and the date "1995″. The Paralympic mark appears along with the Braille inscription for "Spirit".

The reverse of the coins features two clasped hands which represent the concept of brotherhood and team spirit embodied by the Olympic Games. This design was used for all four 1995 Olympic Silver Dollar Coins. It was designed by William Krawczewicz and modeled by T. James Ferrell. The inscriptions include "United States of America", "E Pluribus Unum", "Atlanta" and "One Dollar".

More story at http://moderncommemoratives.com/1995-paralympics-blind-runner-silver-dollar/
http://coinsofrepublicindia.blogspot.in
A guide on Republic India Coins & Currencies

tbabinszki

Again, thank you, now also for the inspiration. Originally I was set on covering braille circulation coins, but as I started to read about all the coins you have listed, I will make it a braille/Louis Braille/blind theme. This of course means that it will be longer until I write up something. Primarily because I would like to hold these coins, otherwise where's the fun?:-) I will probably make an exception with the gold coin, though I haven't checked any prices yet.
Tom

<k>

Most of the Ecuador 1988 set also shows Braille: the 50 ccentavos, and the 5, 10, 20 and 50 sucres coins. The 1 sucre did not and showed merely the standard design of national hero Antonio José Francisco de Sucre.

Ecuador 1988 set.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.