Wildlife of the Seychelles

Started by <k>, August 20, 2013, 12:32:41 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

Seychelles 5 cents  1981~.jpg

Reverse of the 5 cents coin of 1981.


The reverse design featured a cassava plant.

This was a FAO-themed design to commemorate World Food Day.

F.A.O. stands for Food and Agricultural Organization.

The F.A.O. is a United Nations body.


The coins still used a numeral for the denomination.

However, the number was also shown as a literal.


The coins of 1976 and 1977 showed 5 CENTS.

The new 5 cents coins showed 5 and FIVE CENTS.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#46


Cassava plant.


Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is also known as manioc.


From Wikipedia:

It is predominantly consumed in boiled form, but substantial quantities are used to extract cassava starch, called tapioca, which is used for food, animal feed, and industrial purposes.

Cassava is the third-largest source of food carbohydrates in the tropics, after rice and maize. Cassava is a major staple food in the developing world, providing a basic diet for over half a billion people. It is one of the most drought-tolerant crops, capable of growing on marginal soils.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#47
Seychelles 10c 1981-.jpg

Reverse of the 10 cents coin of 1981.



The 10 cents coin was made of brass.

It weighed 3.35 grams and had a diameter of 21 mm.


The obverse showed the coat of arms as usual.

The reverse design featured a yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares).

Like the 5 cents coin of 1981, it also commemorated World Food Day.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Yellow fin tuna.jpg

Yellowfin tuna.


The yellowfin tuna is among the larger tuna species. It is found in pelagic waters of tropical and subtropical oceans worldwide. Reported sizes in the literature have ranged as high as 2.4 m (7 ft 10 in) in length and 200 kg (440 lb) in weight. The second dorsal fin and the anal fin, and the finlets between those fins and the tail, are bright yellow, giving this fish its common name.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Royal Mint-Seychelles August 1981.jpg

The Seychelles Monetary Authority's memo to the Royal Mint.


The new 5 and 10 cents coins of 1981 had now been issued. The remainder of the series was due to be issued in 1982. In August 1981 the Seychelles Monetary Authority asked the Royal Mint to consider giving the 25 cents coin a beaded rim. This was indeed done in 1982. Interestingly, the 1 rupee coin was also given a beaded rim in 1982. The 1 rupee coins of 1976 and 1977 lacked beads. Curiously, the 25 cents and 1 rupee were the only coins whose reverse designs were not changed in 1982, except for minor amendments.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Seychelles 1c 1982.jpg

Reverse of the 1 cent coin of 1982.


In 1981 the remaining denominations of the series were issued.

The 1 cent coin was made of brass.

It weighed 1.4 grams and had a diameter of 16 mm.


The reverse design featured a Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis).

It was the work of English artist and sculptor Robert Elderton.


The obverse showed the coat of arms.

It looked the same as the obverse of the brass 1 and 2 cent coins of 1981.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




A Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis).

This crab has furry claws that look like mittens.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Seychelles 5c 1982.jpg

Reverse of the 5 cents coin of 1982.


The 1982 5 cents coin was an amended version of the 1981 coin.

The World Food Day slogan was removed from the reverse.

Otherwise it retained the same size, shape, weight and metal content.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#53

 
Reverse of the 10 cents coin of 1982.


The 1982 10 cents coin was an amended version of the 1981 coin.

The World Food Day slogan was removed from the reverse.

Otherwise the coin retained the same size, shape, weight and metal content.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Seychelles 25c 1982-.jpg

Obverse of the 25 cents coin of 1982.


The 25 cents coin retained the same dimensions and metal content as in the 1970s.

The Royal Mint added beads to the coin in response to a request by the Seychelles.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Seychelles 25c 1982.jpg

Reverse of the 25 cents of 1982.


This reverse design was amended slightly for 1982.

The 1977 design had removed the upper legend of INDEPENDENCE 1976.

However, it did not reposition the parrot.

This had left a large blank space above the parrot.


Robert Elderton of the Royal Mint moved the design higher up the coin.

The Royal Mint added beads in response to a request by the Seychelles.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Seychelles 1 rupee 1982.jpg

Reverse of the 1 rupee coin of 1982.


The 1 rupee coin was reduced in size.

It was reduced from 30 mm to 25.4mm in diameter

It now weighed 6.2 grams instead of 11.65 grams.


The reverse design was also significantly amended.

The Triton shell was moved down the coin somewhat.


The denominational text was changed from "1 RUPEE" to "ONE RUPEE  1".

The Royal Mint added beads in response to a request by the Seychelles.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Seychelles 5 rupee 1982.jpg

Seychelles, 5 rupees, 1982.  Obverse.


The new 5 rupees coin was made of copper-nickel.

It was round but had a polygonal inner rim.

It weighed 8.97 grams and had a diameter of 29 mm.

The 5 rupees coins of 1977 and 1976 weighed 13.5 grams.

The new coin was therefore significantly lighter.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Seychelles 5 rupee 1982-.jpg

Seychelles, 5 rupees, 1982.  Reverse.


The reverse of the 5 rupees coin featured a coco de mer tree.

This was a new design by Frederick Mogford of the Royal Mint (UK).


The previous 5 rupees coins had featured a different design of this tree species.

Here then we saw thematic design continuity implemented once more.

The 5 rupees coin was now the highest denomination of the new series.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Coco de mer-.jpg

Coco de mer tree.


From Wikipedia:

Lodoicea maldivica, commonly known as the sea coconut, coco de mer, or double coconut, is a monotypic genus in the palm family. The sole species, Lodoicea maldivica, is endemic to the islands of Praslin and Curieuse in the Seychelles. It has the biggest seed in a plant.

The tree generally grows to between 25 and 34 metres tall. The mature fruit is 40 to 50 cm in diameter and weighs 15 to 30 kg, and it contains the largest seed in the plant kingdom. The fruit, which requires 6 to 7 years to mature and a further two years to germinate, is sometimes also referred to as the sea coconut, love nut, double coconut, coco fesse, or Seychelles nut.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.