Author Topic: East Asian architecture on coins  (Read 241658 times)

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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #60 on: August 02, 2013, 07:09:15 PM »
Apart from the scientific value, I like the stone architecture in Korea. It's more aesthetic and Eco-friendly than brick architectures in China.
Cheomseongdae , or Satr-gazing Tower in Korean (Sino-Korean!) was a Korean Astronomical Observatory built by Queen Seondeok of Silla in the 600s.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheomseongdae
Lame people tried to point out it's for Astrology other than Astronomy, but I miss the days when Astronomy and Astrology was essentially one thing.

Regards

Chuan
« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:54:38 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #61 on: August 02, 2013, 07:21:53 PM »
Korea, Independence Gate.
Initially as a symbol of independence from China, but later a symbol of the March 1st Independence movement, from Japan.
Here it is used as a reference to Korean independence in 1945.

« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:55:02 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #62 on: August 02, 2013, 07:27:17 PM »
Mogao Caves of Dunhuang.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mogao_Caves

Not quite an architectural Marvel, but known for the paintings inside.

« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:52:23 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #63 on: August 02, 2013, 07:36:02 PM »

It's a traditional cultural element used in architecture, that's it.
Quote
Huabiao  is a type of ceremonial columns used in traditional Chinese architecture. Huabiaos are traditionally erected in front of palaces and tombs. The prominence of their placement have made them one of the emblems of traditional Chinese culture.

Classical texts in China attribute the beginning of the huabiao to Shun, a legendary leader traditionally dated to the 23rd-22nd century BC...

The Huainanzi describes the feibangmu, literally "commentary board", as a wooden board set up on main roads to allow the people to write criticism of government policies.

In the Han Dynasty, the bangmu became merely a symbol of the government's responsibility to the people. These were erected near bridges, palaces, city gates and tombs; the name huabiao arose during this time.

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huabiao)

« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:52:02 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #64 on: August 02, 2013, 07:38:37 PM »


Tsinghua University Centenary
Tsinghua Main Gate

I like the depiction of the gate (iconically) as well as use of the text as frame, but the text itself again fails me. Someone used Microsoft Yahei as the font?
« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:51:35 PM by Niels »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #65 on: August 02, 2013, 07:49:08 PM »
This picture belongs with reply 61. The memorial is not as old as it looks, but it has much emotional value. It is not easy to be situated between China and Japan. Read more here.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 02:59:43 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #66 on: August 02, 2013, 07:51:53 PM »
South Korea, Seoul's Great South Gate, officially known as the Sungnyemun (Gate of the Exalted Rites).


This coin commemorate the restoration of the gate after it's burnt down by an arsonist.


Sad, sad people. But it's a beautiful coin.

« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:51:10 PM by Niels »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #67 on: August 02, 2013, 08:00:02 PM »
Here is the huabiao on Tienanmen that apparently served as an example. There are amazing similarities between the huabiao and totem poles. This picture goes with reply 63.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 03:00:29 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #68 on: August 02, 2013, 08:25:53 PM »
Here is the huabiao on Tienanmen that apparently served as an example. There are amazing similarities between the huabiao and totem poles. This picture goes with reply 65.

Peter
I've actually read a book by a mainland Chinese living in north America whom, after reading too much Jack London, decided to venture north alone, along with his car, and then he stumbled across a set of totem poles, thus beginning his love affair with Pacific Indian culture.

He got himself hired by a Indian fishing-boat owner, and spent long days on the sea carving totem poles.

He later read up about pacific Indians, and wrote a Chinese book about totem poles...

And I think your speculation make sense. Shang and Zhou Dynasty Chinese bronze art was very very similar to pacific Indian art I read in that book(see below) , and both are different from the Mesopotamian , Indus or Egyptian civilization. And aside from the physical similarities, the totem poles were used to document legends of a tribe, and if traditions had been the same in China, later Chinese writers might mistaken it for "criticism against rulers" as these tribal legends may not be all that nice.

Chinese Bronze Pattern

Pacific Indian Pattern

It's a very tempting theory.

Chuan
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #69 on: August 02, 2013, 08:45:24 PM »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulguksa
The Seokguram Grotto(above) is a hermitage and part of the Bulguksa temple complex (Below).
It was built by King Beopheung of Silla. The name Beopheung means "Reviving the (Buddha) Dharma".
Somehow I felt Korea was a more competitive and creative nation under the three kingdoms than under one unified Goryeo or Joseon state.

Bulguksa is located on the slopes of mount Toham (Jinheon-dong, Gyeongju city, North Gyeongsang province, South Korea). It is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and encompasses seven National treasures of South Korea, including Dabotap and Seokgatap stone pagodas, Cheongun-gyo (Blue Cloud Bridge), and two gilt-bronze statues of Buddha. The temple is classified as Historic and Scenic Site No. 1 by the South Korean government.[1] In 1995, Bulguksa was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List together with the Seokguram Grotto, which lies four kilometers to the east.

Bulguksa

Seokguram Grotto

Chuan
« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:50:40 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #70 on: August 02, 2013, 08:49:32 PM »
Joseon Kings' Ancestral Temple
Jongmyo
With Confucian Ceremonies.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jongmyo



Regards
Chuan
« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:50:15 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #71 on: August 02, 2013, 09:03:26 PM »
PRC
1Yuan
1981

The Great Wall.
In the 1980s, some sections of the wall was renovated with little knowledge of rules of relic renovation.
The Ming Great Wall therefore suffered.
But it's not that the wall was completely a "made-for-tourist" thing like Saddam's Babylon palaces...

Plus, large portions of the great walls are NOT tourist attractions, and therefore are NOT subjected to such tragic, destructive renovations, they are referred to as "wild" Great Wall (like this Jiankou Great Wall below), and remains original.



Regards
Chuan. 
« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:49:47 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #72 on: August 02, 2013, 09:54:43 PM »
Macau: Temple of A-Ma
The Portuguese came, asked the locals what is this place, the locals thought they were pointing at the temple, and answered in Cantonese: "ma-gok", House of the Mother, or Ma-tzu's temple. Hence come the name "Macau".


« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:48:51 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #73 on: August 02, 2013, 10:39:59 PM »
This is not a real life building.
This is the Guanghan palace, a mythical building on the moon, where Chang'e is said to live.
Coin for Mid-autumn Festival.





« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:49:19 PM by Niels »
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Offline SquareEarth

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #74 on: August 02, 2013, 10:49:35 PM »
Another non-existent building is Hanyuan Hall of Daming Palace.

An Tang Dynasty palace which the Archeologist could only imagine what it used to be like.

This is all we have now:


Historians face tremendous difficulty in re-creating what the palace was really like, but it does not stop tourism developers from building theme parks out of it, and tell tourists that they are real...
 >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:(
« Last Edit: November 10, 2015, 01:18:09 PM by Niels »
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