Author Topic: East Asian architecture on coins  (Read 241651 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Prosit

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4 084
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #45 on: August 19, 2010, 11:37:12 PM »
I have always found open air markets very enjoyable.
Dale

...Its name was also used for a huge nearby open air market...Peter

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 174
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #46 on: August 19, 2010, 11:46:45 PM »
Try searching pictures in Google with namdaemun market. It takes hours to cover this one and you get lost continuously.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 135
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #47 on: March 12, 2011, 05:03:51 PM »
Sri Lanka independence commemorative, 50 rupees, 1998.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 10:43:15 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 174
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #48 on: March 12, 2011, 07:35:14 PM »
This is of course the temple of the tooth of Buddha (Dalada Maligawa) in Kandy with the Pattirippuwa (Octagon) in the forefront. We are no longer in East Asia, but who cares? There are many more graceful buildings to explore in Asia.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 02:31:47 PM by coffeetime »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 135
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #49 on: March 12, 2011, 08:44:30 PM »
Back into East Asia now. From Thailand.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 174
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #50 on: March 12, 2011, 09:00:19 PM »
The ordination hall (Ubosot) of Wat Benchamabophit in Bangkok. As Wikipedia puts it: "Also known as the marble temple, it is one of Bangkok's most beautiful temples and a major tourist attraction."

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline goossen

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 43
    • My coins
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #51 on: June 22, 2011, 09:54:03 PM »
Great post. Here is my collaboration:

Mongolia 200 Tugrik, with the Government Palace.

« Last Edit: February 03, 2017, 10:20:29 PM by eurocoin »

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 135
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #52 on: August 03, 2011, 04:44:45 PM »
Cambodia, 1853, one tical.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2011, 09:56:25 PM by coffeetime »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 174
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #53 on: August 03, 2011, 09:07:34 PM »
The Brtish Museum claims it is Angkor Wat. It is difficult to argue with the BM, but look at the picture: the towers are different, the roof is different and what is similar is pretty typical for many Cambodian temples. My problem is that I have nothing better to offer.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4 084
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #54 on: January 08, 2012, 05:40:55 AM »
Thailand 2 Baht

Is that 2010? 
« Last Edit: January 08, 2012, 02:05:31 PM by Prosit »

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 174
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #55 on: January 10, 2012, 11:39:35 AM »
That is Wat Saket, the golden mount temple in Bangkok.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 02:32:31 PM by coffeetime »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline adam

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 136
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #56 on: January 11, 2012, 04:54:39 AM »
Any help with the date?
Dale
Quote
Thailand 2 Baht

Is that 2010? 

Yes. It is B.E. 2553 = A.D. 2010
.
Thai bimetallic coins and nickel alloy 10, 20, 50 & 100 baht coins
Last update: Dec 2015 updated only nickel coin info.
.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 135
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #57 on: November 28, 2012, 07:10:48 PM »
Laos, 10,000 kip, 1975.  Wat Xieng Thong (Temple of the Golden City).
« Last Edit: December 08, 2019, 06:56:35 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 174
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #58 on: November 28, 2012, 08:11:13 PM »
Wat Xieng Thong in Luang Prabang.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline SquareEarth

  • Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 440
  • cn jp kr vn
Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #59 on: August 02, 2013, 07:02:27 PM »


Gyeonghoeru(Celebration and Reunion Building, Korean Royal Banquet Hall),
a part of Gyeongbokgung (Auspicious and Happy Palace, Korean Palace Complex)
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyeongbokgung



I fell in love with the place when I saw it on Korean old 10000won note.


Regards
Chuan
« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 09:54:08 PM by Niels »
Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao