Author Topic: East Asian architecture on coins  (Read 241663 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2008, 09:47:44 PM »
We are moving South now and why not? This will open the thread up to the rich heritage of Thailand. Meanwhile, here's what Aidan was talking about in banknote form and a slightly different angle in reality, with a close-up added to do the pagoda justice.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 06:27:06 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Galapagos

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2008, 03:42:34 PM »
Here is the Indonesian traditional Menangkabau house, as portrayed on the 1978 100 rupiah coin.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 06:27:37 PM by <k> »

Offline ghipszky

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2009, 04:48:43 AM »
Such beautiful buildings!!! I love bank notes because of the beauty and the colors. I love the architecture in that part of the world. This thread is very interesting.
Ginger
And how to count what yr the coin was minted could be learned.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2009, 03:57:31 PM »
Thailand also has some great buildings on its coins, but I don't have a source for which buildings they are.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #19 on: August 07, 2009, 08:32:53 PM »
Thailand also has some great buildings on its coins, but I don't have a source for which buildings they are.

Peter

I haven't looked yet, but what about Schön?  His descriptions are usually pretty thorough.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2009, 12:17:21 AM »
No descriptions in my stone age edition. Malaysia (Parliament building) and Singapore (apartment block and airport control tower) didn't really fit the bill.

Here's one my daughter passed during a boat tour in Bangkok. The object of this coin is the royal barge, Suphannahong. However, to its left in the background rises the silhouette of the imposing Wat Aran.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 06:28:31 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2009, 12:48:34 AM »
Found another one. KM183, 1 baht 2538 BE (1995 AD), showing part of the Royal palace complex in Bangkok.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 06:32:02 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #22 on: August 08, 2009, 01:17:11 AM »
Back to Japan. This is Y85, 100 yen 1975 for Expo'75 in Okinawa. It features Shurei-no-mon, the gate to the Shuri-jo (Shuri castle). To see a tourist's impression of the castle (the gate comes into view after 2 minutes), go here

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 06:32:49 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #23 on: August 08, 2009, 01:45:01 AM »
A coin with two buildings. The big building is the Potala palace in Lhasa, Tibet. Unfortunately, this is a Chinese coin: Y96, 1 yuan 1985.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 06:36:24 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #24 on: August 08, 2009, 02:32:38 AM »
An interesting counterpoint to the previous one is this one. Taiwan, 10 yuan 54 (1965) commemorating Dr. Sun Yat Sen. The obverse has his portrait, the reverse his mausoleum in Nanking, which is in mainland China. The design is somewhat childish and the angle pretty impossible, but the designer had undoubtedly never been there. The two buildings on the coin don't figure together on any picture on the net, so they are presented separately. The building in the foreground is the gatehouse. The main building is in the background.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 06:38:10 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline ghipszky

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #25 on: August 08, 2009, 02:36:31 AM »
Wow those coins are amazing Peter. Most Roman coins with architecture on them are costly. How much would the average coin that you have shown in the most recent posts costs if you found one to buy? Where do you buy these types of coins??
Ginger

Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #26 on: August 08, 2009, 02:54:46 AM »
The coins range from extremely common (the two Thais, the Korean) to pretty hard to find, but still relatively cheap (the Taiwanese coin). Apart from the Taiwanese, you should be able to find a couple of these coins in rummage trays and the rest should be available from serious dealers in non-US coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #27 on: August 08, 2009, 03:14:16 AM »
The last one I found (also on a cheap coin) is from Mongolia, KM 124, 100 tugrik 1994 with the temple of Boddhisattva Avalokiteshvara at Gandantegchinlen Monastery. The dimension seem slightly incorrect. The character on the other side is the soyombo, very well explained in Wikipedia.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 06:39:20 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2009, 03:25:15 AM »
This is an EXCELLENT thread with a lot of wonderful images of coins and places.
Way to go!  Keep em coming.

Dale

Offline Bimat

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Re: East Asian architecture on coins
« Reply #29 on: August 08, 2009, 07:38:43 AM »
What an amazing thread! Interesting places and coins :) I wish I could visit Thailand and see those places.(Where are you Richie? You must have seen few of those in your Thailand trip? ;) )
India issued a 1 Rupee commemorative showing our Parliament on reverse as well.
After seeing this thread,I can definitely say that this can be a good thematic collection :)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.