British Empire: East Africa and Uganda Protectorates

Started by <k>, July 18, 2013, 06:16:07 PM

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Afrasi

Quote from: <k> on July 18, 2013, 07:54:02 PMOther anomalies of the East Africa coins: after the dropping of the florin system, the 25 cents denomination was dropped and never reintroduced.
Kenya did let mint real coins of 25 ct in 1966, 1967 and 1969. In 1973 there was additionally a Proof issue.

africancoins

Something realting to the East African Shilling on my page here...

http://www.wbcc.fsnet.co.uk/af-sol.htm

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Enlil

I am just wondering as to why it was introduced as a decimal system in the first place?

<k>

East Africa 50c 1954~.jpg

Here's the only denomination on which QEII appeared.

This 50 cents is dated 1954, but there also issues in several subsequent years.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

The reason for the early decimalisation was a dearth of silver coins due to colonial wars in all of East Africa in almost the whole 19th century. The prevailing silver currency in circulation in East Africa was that of Mauritius. The Mauritius rupee was decimal from 1876, under the influence of circulating French coins: a cent was equal to the old French sou, and there were 100 sous in a 5 francs piece, the standard coin in Mauritius.

The economy of East Africa was thereby in fact based on the French sou, called cent. Until 1920, the British florin, roughly equal to 2 Indian rupees was the administrative currency unit (there was a rupee coin issued in 1888 for Mombasa on this standard). This anomaly was removed in 1920 by replacing the Indian rupee by the British shilling as the basic currency unit.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

East Africa Protectorate 1 pice 1898.jpg


Under British administration, bronze '1 pice' coins were struck at the Bombay Mint in 1897, 1898 and 1899. The text says 'EAST AFRICA PROTECTORATE'. This denomination was equivalent to one hundredth of a silver rupee from British India. So this coin is an anomaly, the only East African coin of its day.

Prior to that, the British Imperial East Africa company (the forerunner to the East African currency board) issued coins (or are they better described as tokens?), images of which can be seen here.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Harry

Thanks for putting this together, it's a very interesting post.  The economies of East Africa was influenced by Arabs and Indians.  This is very evident in the coins and currency. This  20 shilling / 1 Pound note, which has Arabic and Gujarati (an Indian language) on it.



Also, take a look at this page Wikipedia article East African shilling - Wikipedia the table at the end provides a very nice overview of the currency used in that region.

The Arielle Collection Of British Colonial Coins has some amazing British East Africa, Mombassa and Zanzibar coins that are going to be auctioned by Baldwins on  Sep 26th,  2013.  See NumisBids: A.H. Baldwin & Sons Ltd Auction 85 (26 September 2013): East Africa –  browsing through the pictures and reading the notes on each coin is very interesting.  This is one of the coin that is part of this auction, similar to the one on your thread above but an OMS struck in silver.



Thanks again for your post.

Harry
Collector of British India, Straits Settlements, Malaya, East Africa coins and papermoney

<k>

Excellent images, Harry, and thanks for the links. That's a beautiful note (though I don't collect notes myself). It's the first time I've seen a pound referred to as "twenty shillings" on a banknote. Does anybody know if there are any other examples, from anywhere in the world?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

See also: British West Africa.

Eventually the word "Nigeria" was dropped from the British West Africa coins' legend - just as "Uganda" was dropped from the legends of the coins of East Africa.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Read how the Royal Mint developed the first aluminium coins for East Africa, and how the initial difficulties were overcome:

The value of small change
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<k>

East Africa, 1 shilling, 1944.  N# 11397.

Image from NGC.

I do not know which artist is responsible for this design.

When I saw the initials "SA", I thought that might be a clue.

However, Numista lists Pretoria, South Africa, as one of the mints responsible for the coins:

SA    Pretoria, South Africa (1890-1902; 1923-1992).


East Africa 1 shilling 1944.jpg
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

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<k>



The beautiful lion design was first issued with the date 1906.


I have checked the Royal Mint Annual Reports and also asked the Royal Mint, in order to find out the name of the designer.

Sadly, the Royal Mint holds no data on this.

Does anybody know which Royal Mint engravers were active in 1906?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.