Author Topic: New Zealand: 2013 Mint Sets  (Read 917 times)

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Offline Bimat

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New Zealand: 2013 Mint Sets
« on: May 20, 2013, 04:05:54 PM »
Legal Tender Coins to Mark 2013

13:00 May 20, 2013

Press Release – NZ Post

New Zealand Post has released the 2013 edition in its ongoing series of currency coin sets with each denomination of legal tender coin being produced annually. Legal Tender Coins to Mark 2013

New Zealand Post has released the 2013 edition in its ongoing series of currency coin sets – with each denomination of legal tender coin being produced annually.

As stamps and coins spokesman Simon Allison explains, the coins we see each day aren’t usually produced every calendar year – with the Reserve Bank only producing coins as the need arises.

“So last year for example, they only produced 10 cent coins, as there was a sufficient supply of other coin denominations in circulation.  And in 2011 they produced 10 cent coins and $2 coins – but nothing else in terms of coinage.

“The only way to get a full set of each year’s currency coins is through New Zealand Post’s annual currency sets.”

New Zealand Post is authorised by the Reserve Bank of New Zealand as the only official issuer of legal tender New Zealand commemorative coins.

“This set has each denomination of coin – available in proof quality or brilliant uncirculated quality – with 2013 as the year of issue.

“We reckon these sets will go down a storm with collectors, plus they make a great gift for special occasions happening in 2013, and a nice memento for people visiting New Zealand.

“If you know someone who’s expecting a baby this year, or there’s a wedding in the family, these would make a clever and poignant gift.

This annual series of currency coins will each year highlight a New Zealand city – with the nation’s capital, Wellington, being featured in the packaging for the 2013 set.

The sets come in two varieties:

·A ‘Brilliant uncirculated’ set, which retails for $49.90 and includes all denominations of New Zealand currency coins – dated as 2013. Mintage is limited to 2,000 worldwide.

·A limited edition (maximum 1,500 worldwide) proof quality currency set, which retails for $119.90.  In addition to the full set of coins in proof quality and dated as 2013, this set also includes the 2013 New Zealand Annual Coin – with a face value of $5 – featuring the short-tailed bat. This unique and ancient species of bat is listed by DOC as a ‘species of highest conservation priority’.

The 2013 New Zealand Currency Sets are available from 20 May through selected PostShops, at REAL Aotearoa stores in Auckland and Wellington, online at www.nzcoins.co.nz or by phoning 0800 NZCOINS.

Source: Business Scoop
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Offline Levantiner

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Re: New Zealand: 2013 Mint Sets
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2013, 04:15:49 PM »
I used to religiously buy NZ proof sets but I became so disenchanted with the service from NZ post that I stopped buying in 2011.  My biggest issue is the lack of credibility over mintage numbers and the quality of the coins.

Offline Alan71

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Re: New Zealand: 2013 Mint Sets
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2017, 03:31:48 AM »
From what I can gather, the 2013 Uncirculated sets were the last ones produced.  Even though they were intended as the first of a "new look" series, removing the $5 coin and with a pack focussing on Wellington, it turned out to be the last.  Since then, only proof sets have been produced.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: New Zealand: 2013 Mint Sets
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2017, 12:28:22 AM »
They overplayed their hand, I guess. Their "legal tender" blather sounds horribly dated today. The golden days of "buy immediately or miss out on getting rich quickly" are over. The suckers have moved on, leaving a hole in the market for newly issued coins. It's not a real problem...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.