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Metal alloys used for Euro coins

Started by Idris Sayyad, March 26, 2013, 08:44:36 AM

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Idris Sayyad

I found this in my text book of material science and metallurgy .

2 euro - outer ring is a 75copper - 25nickel alloy,  inner disk is composed of three layer structure - high purity nickel that is clad on both sides with a nickel brass alloy (75copper-20zinc-5nickel)

1 euro - same as 2 euro coin the outer ring and inner
disk are reversed

50,20,10 euro cents are made of Nordic gold alloy
(89copper-5aluminium-5zinc-1tin)

Figleaf

Like other aspects of the euro coins, there is high technology and advanced knowledge in that choice. Nordic gold, for instance is non-allergenic and the bi-metallic coins, with a magnetic and non-magnetic part, are hard to imitate.

The major weak point of Nordic gold is its low resistance to salt water and artificial fertiliser. You lose the coin, it quickly solves in the landscape.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Quote from: Idris Sayyad on March 26, 2013, 08:44:36 AM
2 euro - outer ring is a 75copper - 25nickel alloy,  inner disk is composed of three layer structure - high purity nickel that is clad on both sides with a nickel brass alloy (75copper-20zinc-5nickel)

Yep, right. Side note: The three lower denominations are (Cu-)galvanized steel.

Quote
1 euro - same as 2 euro coin the outer ring and homes disk are reversed

Sort of. The ring (outer area) is Cu75 Zn20 Ni05. The pill (central area) is Cu75 Ni25 plated nickel.

Christian

chrisild

By the way, "Nordic Gold" is a patent protected alloy. The patent holder is Luvata (UK).

Christian

Bimat

Are there any rules / guidelines for metals to be used for Euro collector coins?

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

chrisild

#5
Since collector coins don't have anything to do with the concept of a common currency as far as the practical use is concerned, each issuing member state may basically do what it wants - as long as those pieces can be easily identified. So European law regarding such collector coins is rather about what should not be done. Here are two summaries:

(Comparison - PDF) http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/euro/cash/coins/pdf/types_coins_en.pdf
(2012 Legislation) http://europa.eu/legislation_summaries/economic_and_monetary_affairs/introducing_euro_practical_aspects/ec0023_en.htm

The following (in italics) is from that overview page.
In order to differentiate them from circulation coins, collector coins shall meet all of the following criteria:
• their face value must be different from the face value of circulation coins;
• their image must be different to the common sides of circulation coins;
• their colour, diameter and weight must differ significantly from those of circulation coins for at least two of these three characteristics; and
• they must not have a shaped edge with fine scallops or a 'Spanish flower' shape.


The full text of the actual law is here: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2012:201:0135:0137:EN:PDF (see Article 5, on the second page).

Christian

Bimat

That's exactly what I wanted to know! Thank you Christian! :)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.