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Author Topic: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century  (Read 7648 times)

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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century
« Reply #30 on: March 05, 2013, 01:37:58 PM »
Better late than never, probably because they had never honoured him so far. After a few years in the limelight, he will probably also disappear from their coins.

Perhaps next year, when his daughter may no longer be the head of the government.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century
« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2013, 01:49:23 PM »
Moreover, if there are two bimetallics, it'll often be the case that the outer-inner ring will be Silver-gold colour combo for the higher value and Gold-silver for that of the lower denomination ( la 2 & 1 and 5zl & 2zl). However, if there is just one bimetallic, it used to be Silver-gold (eg 500lire, 10Bhat etc)...though now it tends to be Gold-silver (eg Indian Rs10, Brazil R1)

Interesting generalisation.
More than one bimetallic but same color combination retained is Mexico.

In case of India, Prof A K Sinha, who designed the first bimetallic, had recomended Rupees 5 to be bimetallic too. That somehow was not accepted and steel 5 Rupees was issued. Had that been issued, it would have been Silver-gold.

Also, not all bimetallics have to be two toned. See Algeria 10 Dinar, Cupro Nickel outer ring and Aluminum Inner portion.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century
« Reply #32 on: March 05, 2013, 02:13:30 PM »
More than one bimetallic but same color combination retained is Mexico.

Ah, but Mexico has five bimetallic coin denominations, and the two higher ones have a golden ring and a silverish pill. :) See this page (in Spanish). The $10 coin is actually in use; the $20 ... not much.

Christian

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century
« Reply #33 on: March 06, 2013, 09:15:00 AM »
Ah, but Mexico has five bimetallic coin denominations, and the two higher ones have a golden ring and a silverish pill. :) Christian

Thanks. As per my records, 20 Peso coin has never been issued in definitive series.
Only twice as commem in last 12 years.

Yes, 10 Peso is a circulation coin but not found much in use there.
To that extent, I stand corrected.
Most of the commems are 5 Pesos only.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century
« Reply #34 on: March 12, 2013, 08:23:39 PM »
Outer rings are silver or Cupro Nickel on higher value coins because that alloy is harder and more expensive. So higher value coins are made longer lasting at higher expense.
Centre core is Nickel bronze or Nordic gold which is comparatively cheaper and softer.

If there are two bimetallic coins in a series then the choice is clear. If there are more than two bimetallics, then the cutoff is economic trade off, as in the case of Mexico and Kenya.




Offline Prosit

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Re: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century
« Reply #35 on: June 24, 2014, 10:11:36 PM »
I do think the elimination of physical money (coins and notes) is inevitable but not soon to happen.

Dale

Offline canadacoin

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Re: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century
« Reply #36 on: June 24, 2014, 11:38:43 PM »
I think another trend in the 21 century numismatics is an increasing number of colored coins with holograms, embedded objects (Swarovski crystals, Venetian glass, Meteorite objects etc).
You can hardly keep up with the new issues at the mint and due to budgetary constraints soon we will start collecting  images of the coins rather than coins themselves ;D.

Offline <k>

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Re: Numismatic Trends of the 21st century
« Reply #37 on: June 25, 2014, 12:11:21 AM »
I think another trend in the 21 century numismatics is an increasing number of colored coins with holograms, embedded objects (Swarovski crystals, Venetian glass, Meteorite objects etc).

True enough, which is why I stated at the beginning of this topic: "I want to confine myself here to trends affecting circulation coins." I'm still waiting for the coin with only one side, which disappears when you turn it over.