Author Topic: Coin die studies  (Read 351 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Andromeda

  • Reader
  • Posts: 2
Coin die studies
« on: October 10, 2019, 02:08:57 AM »
Can anyone help out with information, articles or books illustrating die analysis? I am on a lookout for understanding the die corpus which includes die-identification, die linkages and how one can quantify a relative quantity of coins or calculate coins per year o production. Any help will be duly appreciated!

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 489
Re: Coin die studies
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2019, 09:56:49 AM »
I do not remember anything as general as what you are looking for. There are works on the most impressive die linking exercise (early English pennies). There are also references to the technique where a more modest exercise was undertaken. Not sure if research like the 1862 rupee qualifies for what you are looking for.

There are several books that contain information on die study of US coins. Some go as far as analysis of die crack progression. The purpose of such studies is not quite clear to me.

As for quantifying mintage with die identification, my understanding is that this is still a gleam in the eye of numismatists. I am aware of two projects, one French, one English, to get a grip on the number of coins that could be struck with a Carolingian die. Both were started a few years back, so there may be reports by now, but I  am not aware of them.

Even if an order of size were determined, you'd have to make some heroic assumptions, e.g. similar production methods and metal quality in all mints. Be warned that going from mintage to money quantity is another very difficult step to take. However, if you have some idea of money quantity and take precious metal content as a proxy for inflation, holding trade constant, you might be able to approach money velocity.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 489
Re: Coin die studies
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2019, 11:03:11 AM »
Maybe this article would be of interest to you?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.