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Eire 1966 10/- commemorative

Started by ghipszky, September 08, 2008, 04:43:49 AM

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ghipszky

I got this coin a long time ago, simply because it was Irish. The seller told me the first name, but I didn't look into it as my roman coins were the priority.
I thought I would post it here and learn its history.
Ginger

EDIT: Title

blackev

The coin is a 10 shilling (half of an Irish pound) 1966 Irish coin commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Easter Rising in 1916.
There was a mintage of 2,000,000 for circulation and 20,000 proof versions.
It features Patrick Henry Pearse (one of the leaders in the Easter Rising) on the "obverse".
On the reverse it depicts Cúchulainn (an Irish mythological hero from Ancient Gaelic literature) it looks like the scene of his final battle, the raven on his shoulder was the confirmation to his enemies that he was dead (as they were afraid).

The coin is 83.5% silver and 16.5% copper.
The coin was not popular and as many as 1,270,000 may have been melted down.

The ten shilling is the only Irish coin to feature an inscription on edge until the Irish euro coins.
It does not have the Harp (An unusual thing for an Irish coin).

Ref:
http://www.irishcoinage.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Padraig_Pearse
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuchulain#The_Death_of_C.C3.BA_Ro.C3.AD
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_ten_shilling_coin

P.S when I was in school the teacher would tell many of the Cúchulainn stories, I quite enjoyed them.

-blackev

ghipszky

Thank you Black Ev and Aidan for the great explanations. I have never heard of Easter Rising, what was it about??? And I have both of Frank McCourt's audio books and he mentions Cúchulainn.
This is off topic, but doesn't Robert Plant use his image on one of the Led
Zeppelin Album covers, or was that some other Celtic hero?
Ginger

blackev

Ginger I've never had anyone call me Black Ev before.
My name is Kevin Hipwell, the name blackev stemmed from an online game name I used when I was younger.

-blackev

ghipszky


Figleaf

When you visit Dublin, there is little to remind you of the Easter rising in the Dublin GPO, where it took place. You learn more at Kilmainham Gaol, outside the centre. This is now a museum. The story of the hangings and atrocious shootings that took place there throughout its existence are heavy ammunition against the death penalty. Information available in the museum notes that after Irish independence, executions in the prison went to a new height as political adversaries settled scores. It is an intensely emotional place, blessed with impressive honesty, good taste and respect from the museum staff.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

The Dublin GPO mentioned above is still breathing the atmosphere of 100 years ago. Part of that atmosphere is heavily polished and richly decorated wood furniture. Here is a writing desk in the GPO. In the background is Cúchulainn in a window looking out on the street. The statue was moved there for "safety reasons". In fact, the window mirrors the light so badly you cannot photograph the statue from the outside, so I bought a postcard instead.

The legend has it, that the wounded Cúchulainn demanded to be tied to a post. His enemies did not dare approach him until a raven landed on his shoulder, showing him to be dead. In fact, one of the party in the GPO in 1916, James Connolly, was so badly wounded he had to be executed bound to a chair. The parallel is clear.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>



Let's show the two right next to one another.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

bagerap

What I find amazing is how many of these, essentially commemorative, coins circulated. Clean pieces are getting hard to find.


Figleaf

Quite so, Mr. B. The dealer I bought my copy from had only cleaned coins. I got a discount, though >:D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

akeady

Quote from: bagerap on September 25, 2018, 02:15:32 AM
What I find amazing is how many of these, essentially commemorative, coins circulated. Clean pieces are getting hard to find.

Apart from the 20,000 proofs, they were intended as circulating coins, but apparently were not popular - a 10s note was commonly used at the time and the decimal 50p arrived in 1970, filling in as a 10s coin until decimalisation in February 1971.   Interestingly, the 1966 10s coins were apparently overlooked when most other pre-decimal coins were demonetised on decimalisation (only the 1s = 5p and 2s = 10p survived), so they continued to be legal tender until the introduction of the Euro in 2002, though they were worth more than 50p for their silver content and so didn't circulate.

ATB,
Aidan.


<k>

I don't own one of these, so I've just looked at the dimensions on Wikipedia:

It measured 1.2 inches (30 mm) in diameter and weighed 18.144 grams.

That compares to a diameter of 28mm for the old florin. The later 50p was 30 mm.

This 10 shilling coin had a thickness of 3.21 mm. Compare that to the thickness of the UK round pound, which was 3.15 mm. And at 18 g, the Irish 10 shillings was very heavy - what's the closest circulation coin to that? Probably the Australian 50 cents at 15.55 g.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Prosit

Is there an easy way to tell the business strike from the proof?

Dale

akeady

Quote from: Prosit on September 25, 2018, 11:05:18 PM
Is there an easy way to tell the business strike from the proof?

Dale

Hi Dale,

The proof should be much more reflective than the normal strike - I have one of each, I couldn't locate the Unc. one tonight to put them side by side, but the separate attached photos should show the difference.

ATB,
Aidan.

<k>

According to Wikipedia, the 10 shilling coin was not withdrawn until 10 February 2002.

That was the same date that all the pence coins were withdrawn.

Then came the euro!

I would be surprised if anybody found the 10 shilling coin in circulation in 2002.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.