Author Topic: Holiday guide - museums  (Read 97029 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #45 on: December 15, 2009, 05:33:27 PM »
I saw the exhibition and was VERY impressed. The collection of the Geldmuseum is finger-lickin'. If they come out with what they consider their 100 best pieces, it's a spectacle. I showed you two pieces from the exhibition already here and
here. That may give you the impression that the exhibits are mostly coins. Not so. The prize piece of the exhibition is "the grand cameo", a huge carved stone.

One of my favourites was an old, somewhat rusty saving box. It is interesting because of the story. The money box dates from 1907. While liberals and conservatives had predicted that workers woud never start saving (this was also their argument for not giving them the right to vote; "they would only plunder the treasury."), socialists proved otherwise, by starting a savings bank, specially for the lower social classes in 1818, Nutsspaarbank. The bank was a large success. They copied a US invention, a saving box for at home. The bank instantly become the best customer of lock and key maker Lips. The trick of the saving box was that the key was kept at the bank. When the box was brought in, bank staff would open it and deposit the money. This is of course a highly paternalistic approach, but in many countries it is still used (in electronic form) for pension contributions. The point is that scientific research has shown that, if left to their own devices, people do not save enough to achieve their own goals.

The exhibition is housed in a darkened room. All the items are physically there, but there are a few electronic displays. On one, the curators explain their choices, another explains the year of the four emperors with coins, yet another allows you to browse through an old book by turning the pages of an electronic copy. An overhead projector does a slide show. Most texts were presented in such a way that they were visible only while you are looking at the item and close to the item, which I found very helpful, as you can take in item and picture at the same time, yet you are not distracted by texts when looking at a whole case.

Speaking to the museum curators, it became clear to me what a major problem selection of the items had been. Each have their own specialty and taste and all had too many favourites. Interest was defined by "having a good story", but what is a good story? There were obvious choices, like the grand cameo, but also stories that had to be "sold" to a sceptical audience. The end result is an exceptionally beautiful, sparkling show with great width, catering to many tastes, but sometimes somewhat lacking in depth. That is of course the eternal trade-off in exhibitions.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #46 on: December 17, 2009, 11:36:25 PM »
All the items are physically there, but there are a few electronic displays.

Ah, I had been wondering about that. Thanks for the insight, Peter - and also for showing and explaining that savings box. Seems another trip to Utrecht will be on my schedule early next year ...

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #47 on: December 27, 2009, 12:49:13 AM »
Not your average museum
By CARL HOFFMAN, Dec 25, 2009

(...)

The Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv is the eccentric maiden aunt of Israeli museums. Spread across a sprawling expanse of hills and gardens at the edge of the Tel Aviv University campus in Ramat Aviv, the museum is actually a complex of several large theme pavilions, offering an impressive assortment of indoor exhibits that include ancient ceramics, glass, coins and metallurgy, as well as a network of paths that wind their way past several much smaller pavilions and outdoor exhibits. The small pavilions display reconstructions of ancient olive presses and flour mills; the outdoor exhibitions feature everything from Mameluke and Ottoman-period drinking fountains to 20th-century railroad cars.

(...)

The Kadman Numismatic Pavilion features an extensive collection of coins from all of the country's historical periods, right up until today, as well as bank notes, certificates and other marginalia, like weights.

(...)

Source: Jeruzalem Post (numismatic paragraphs shown only)
« Last Edit: May 09, 2010, 01:44:55 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #48 on: December 27, 2009, 12:58:02 AM »

... marginalia ...


Wonderful wording!   Far better than the unmentionable me*%#-co~^$!

I think this should become a regular WoC expression.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #49 on: January 03, 2010, 01:14:17 AM »
Last July, the Singapore Coins and Notes museum opened. Its address is 2 Trengganu Street, Level 3 ( Entrance at Pagoda Street). Its web page is here. To get an idea of what's inside, click here.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 09, 2010, 01:45:15 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #50 on: January 05, 2010, 10:02:47 PM »
Kremnica: Museum of Coins and Medals

Kremnica is not only the location of one of the oldest mints in the world (see here) but also home of a numismatic museum: The central bank of the Slovak Republic (Národná banka Slovenska) has a "Museum of Coins and Medals" in the city. The museum's start page is here:
http://www.nbs.sk/en/museum-of-coins-and-medals

For further information, use the menu on the left. The most interesting part from "our" point of view :) is the info about Two Faces of Money. Some exhibits can be viewed online too:
http://www.nbs.sk/en/museum-of-coins-and-medals/two-faces-of-money-money-and-medals-in-the-history-of-slovakia/coin-minting

Unfortunately the images cannot be enlarged. Still some great info there. Do not have any first hand experience though, as I have not been to Kremnica so far. So if anybody has already visited the mint and/or the museum, please let us know!

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #51 on: January 05, 2010, 10:25:29 PM »
I can't resist presenting what is by far my largest medal. It contains about 200 grams of copper, has a diameter of 8 cm and a thickness of about 0.5 cm, nothing my electronic scales and electronic calliper can deal with

On the obverse a fortified city and a long-haired coiner below the date 1328 and 1988. The text below means 660 years Kremnitz mint. A stolid, but professional design, until you come to the historic coin collection below.

The upper half of the reverse is communist propaganda. The screw press is irrelevant. It wasn't used either in 1328 or in 1988. The text means "State mint / bearer of the medal of labour and the medal of the victorious February" (thanks, translateltd). The round symbol is the mint's logo, MK monogram between two dies in a circle. The star stands for the two decorations. Both are star-shaped. I am showing the February decoration. This side is saved by a fun cascade of Czech coins current in 1988.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #52 on: January 06, 2010, 08:27:52 AM »
The screw press is irrelevant. It wasn't used either in 1328 or in 1988.

Wow, a great (and BIG) medal, Peter. The design sure is an interesting mix of propaganda and mint(ing)-related elements. As for the screw press, well, for Kremnica it does make a lot of sense to show it that way, even though it is not related to any of the two years above. In my post about the mint, one of the links points at a "History" article which says:

"The era of the greatest fame of Kremnica Mint was associated with the use of a screw press, referred to as 'Balancier'. This machine was introduced at Kremnica Mint by the well-known Swedish engineer, engraver and medal-maker Daniel Warou in 1710."

1710? Hmm, I smell a jubilee year coming up ... ;)

Christian

Austrokiwi

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #53 on: January 12, 2010, 11:07:02 AM »
I am trying to find out a contact email or snail mail adress for either the Mumbai mint, or an associated museum. Is there a museum?  I conducted a goggle search and had very little success.  Any contact info would be greatly appreciated.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #54 on: January 12, 2010, 11:21:14 AM »
Odd. I was about to "recommend" this website http://www.mumbaimint.org which was also mentioned in the "mints" topic here http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,2534.0.html#msg22358 ... but apparently that domain name is no longer in use.

Christian

Online asm

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #55 on: January 12, 2010, 12:47:41 PM »
It appears that the mumbai mints' website has been squatted upon by some one. May be some government bureaucrat forgot to make the payment in time. The RBI also has a currency museum and you will find it at http://www.rbi.org.in/scripts/mc_gallery.aspx . However there is not much information out there
Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Austrokiwi

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #56 on: January 12, 2010, 03:07:17 PM »
Thanks all:  thats a good help......

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #57 on: January 12, 2010, 07:53:32 PM »
Maybe it helps also i you'd tell us exactly what information you need from the museum, since some of our members live in Mumbai. Some may visit the museum for their own purposes or already have the information you are looking for.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Austrokiwi

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #58 on: January 12, 2010, 08:09:59 PM »
Maybe it helps also i you'd tell us exactly what information you need from the museum, since some of our members live in Mumbai. Some may visit the museum for their own purposes or already have the information you are looking for.

Peter

I hope I don't come across as a bit of a bore..... I am trying to track down whether Bombay still has dies for Maria Theresa Talers.  When one reads Hafner's lexicon, it appears the only visible identification features ( that separate them out from London struck MTT) for Bombay MTTs are oval pearls in the busts diadem. However the main reference on Bombay MTT, Stokes 1980 ( whom Hafner refers to), indicates there are extra lines in the veil of MTT. I have not found a single MTT the matchs Stokes description, so the only possible way to clearly find out is to see if the dies exist.  That may seem a long shot However if I don't ask I will never be told "no"

The importance of trying this research out was emphasised with the arrival of a book that Dale Hall helped me obtain.   In it was pictures of some 1942 Maria Theresa Taler Dies from Paris.  Those dies showed wear on the reverse which two of the Paris mint coins in my collection mirrored; with out the photo of the dies I would never have realised the wear was due to the die rather than circulation.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #59 on: January 13, 2010, 05:57:29 AM »
I can surely help :)

The address of the museum is:

Reserve Bank of India Monetary Museum
Amar Building,Sir Pherozesha Mehta Marg,Mumbai,400 001


Tel. : +91-22-2261 4043
Fax : +91-22-2270 2820

Website : www.museum.rbi.org.in
E-Mail : museum@rbi.org.in

I was supposed to visit the museum in last week,but I couldn't go.I was there yesterday but didn't have enough time to spend there.Well,I might go there on 21 Jan,so if you need any help from me,just drop a PM :)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.