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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #180 on: August 15, 2017, 05:50:30 PM »
Thank you, Bimat. I will be in London in that period and I'll make sure I have time to see it. If there is a catalogue. I'll buy it. Members of WoC can contact me if they also want a copy of the catalogue if there is one.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #181 on: August 16, 2017, 06:15:46 AM »
Lahore Museum reopens three galleries for public

By Mariam ShafqatPublished: August 15, 2017

LAHORE : The Lahore Museum reopened the Coins, Postage Stamps and Freedom Movement galleries, while also exhibiting commemorative coins of Pakistan from 1976 to date on Monday.

Lahore Museum Director Humayun Mazhar, while inaugurating the galleries, said renovation work was carried out under the supervision of additional director Noshaba Anjum. He said the galleries had been renovated so that visitors could properly educate themselves by experiencing a detailed history about the struggle and roles of various leaders to achieving an independent homeland.

The Coins Gallery depicted history from the 6th century BC onwards in a chronological sequence, he said. The museum administration allowed free entry to visitors, while brochures of the Pakistan Freedom Movement Gallery were also distributed to provide information about the creation of the nation.

According to the information provided by Lahore Museum, the Freedom Movement Gallery narrates, with the help of paintings, photographs and newspaper cuttings, the story of the struggle for freedom of the Muslims of India from 1757 to the creation of Pakistan in 1947.

The gallery depicts a photographic description of the life and struggle of Tipu Sultan, Sir Sayed Ahmed Khan, Allama Iqbal and Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah. At the entrance of the gallery is a large painting by Shahbaz Khan, showing Tipu Sultan of Mysore during his last battle against the Britain outside the gates of Seringapatam in 1799.

In the main hall of the gallery are displayed portraits of Sir Syed Ahmed khan, the social and educational reformer and moderniser of the Muslim community, Allama Iqbal, the national poet of Pakistan, Quaid-e-Azam, the founder of Pakistan and Maulvi Fazal-e-Haq who tabled the Pakistan Resolution in Lahore on March 23, 1940.

The last part of the gallery displays photographs with citations of heroes from the armed forces of Pakistan who won the Nishan-e-Haider, the highest military award of Pakistan. There is also a special section which is devoted to the life and achievements of Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah and Allama Iqbal.

The coin collection, comprising 40,000 pieces, is one of the largest in the subcontinent. It includes the earliest examples of punch-marked coins issued in the 6th and 7th century BC during the time of the Achaemenian Empire.

This collection represents almost all the ruling families of the region like Graeco-Bactrian, Indo-Greek, Mauryan, Indo-Parthian, Kushan, Indo-Scythian, Huns, Hindu Shahia, Arabs, Ghaznavids, the Sultans, the Mughals, the Durranis, the Sikhs, the British and the modern coins of Pakistan.

Source: The Tribune
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Offline Bimat

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Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #182 on: October 18, 2017, 08:38:49 AM »
The revolutionary design of communist currencies

Published 18th October 2017

Written by
Jacopo Prisco, CNN

The British Museum explores the history and design of communist banknotes in its latest exhibition, open this week. But the show's title, "The Currency of Communism," is -- in theory -- a contradiction in terms, according to curator Thomas Hockenhull.

"Under full communism, or Marxist theory, there should be no money," he said in a phone interview.

"It's a social construct, therefore it should not exist -- and yet we have the material evidence in front of us, currencies from all these countries that never succeed in eliminating money from their economies."

Since the October Revolution of 1917, more than 20 countries have adopted some form of communism -- so why did none of them abolish money?

"The answer is that it was too difficult: It's impossible to interact with capitalist states without some form of monetary exchange," said Hockenhull.

Instead of eliminating money altogether, which may have caused economic chaos, communist states pursued a different approach: "The currency was symbolically devalued, to give citizens an indication that they should not value monetary wealth, but other things such as social interaction and access to art and culture."

This move brought about a transformation. Stripped of value, money instead carried a message: "It became an organ of state propaganda, a visual representation of the state's aspirations, and easily the most circulated one," said Hockenhull.

While banknotes' designs  were heavy with classic socialist symbols such as workers, foundries and large infrastructure projects, more specific messages were relayed through posters and public ads, which also form part of the British Museum's exhibition.

One poster from the USSR shows a family gathered around a piano, along with the message that saving money "bit by bit" was the only way to buy an expensive item, as there was virtually no access to consumer credit at the time.

The iconography can be taken to comical extremes, such as a Somalian banknote -- designed to empower women -- which shows a woman holding a shovel, a gun and a baby simultaneously. But for Hockenhull, the items on display share one common trait: "The images on the notes are startlingly beautiful," he said.

"They're very aspirational, they show the kind of idealized state that the social government wanted to build."

The Currency of Communism is at London's British Museum from 19 October 2017 to 18 March 2018.

Source: CNN

Image Caption: "Saving Bit by Bit, We'll (Be Able To) Buy," USSR, 1955. Credit: Courtesy The British Museum
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Offline natko

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #183 on: October 20, 2017, 05:28:16 PM »
Was it on exhibition in June as well, now again? Well made exhibition but utterly boring topic. Nothing revolutionary, nothing nice, just dull one colored currencies with all the same motives. Although British somehow are indeed fascinated with certain aspects of communism, like mentioned brainwashing messages, or brutalist architecture which I find the ugliest possible piece of whatever, especially for the monuments and important landmarks (many examples of fine neogothic/neoclasiccist libraries, theaters, halls etc. destroyed to be made just into a block of concrete). I guess it's funny if it's the only building in the country ugly like that. But communist/socialist apartment blocks are far from being exclusive to central and eastern Europe only, where they are stereotyped and assumed.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #184 on: October 20, 2017, 05:36:30 PM »
See reply #179. The exhibition just opened. I'll be in London next and week and I 'll try to go to the BM, though it seems at this moment that I may not have the time. I will try hard to visit Bletchley Park, where one of my heroes, Alan Turing, worked. If the BM visit works, Bletchley Park will be the perfect antidote. ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #185 on: October 20, 2017, 11:39:58 PM »
Before you go to London next week have a look round the British Museum from your armchair
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline malj1

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #186 on: October 20, 2017, 11:54:00 PM »
You can also have a look round the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam but they haven't added much to the site yet.

I visited here many years ago.

Look for links to other museums (Collections) on the British museum site above.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #187 on: November 22, 2017, 06:03:04 PM »
The Frankfurter Allgemeine (a leading German daily) just had an article about the new Mint Museum in Paris. "Spectacular", "worth a visit" etc. :)

At the beginning of the article (in German), the author says that the British did everything wrong. With regard to the old mint building in the capital, that is. Both the Mint in London and the Monnaie in Paris were built roughly at the same time, in both cases the coin production was moved to a facility "far away" in the 1970s ...

The French, on the other hand, did everything right. (Again according to the article.) Which means that the old mint building still "breathes" the spirit of coins - with a numismatic museum, plus the administration and the design department which continue to be in Paris. Plus, it is now more open than in the years when Hôtel de la Monnaie was actually a production site.

The 11 Conti Museum, named after the address of the building in Quai de Conti, is now open. Parts of the surrounding area, such as new connections for pedestrians, are still in the works. Some more info in French about the new mint museum is here for example.

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #188 on: November 22, 2017, 07:32:40 PM »
Thank you, Christian. The link in the first post now points here. It is a bit bittersweet for me; I would have liked to guide the WoC members visiting Paris in 2016 there. The best I could do was to offer them a french TV documentary that showed the building's innards. However, it's very high on my list of things to do now.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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« Reply #189 on: January 18, 2018, 03:41:09 PM »
Japan’s Currency Museum traces history of money

By Yusuke Sano Japan News/Yomiuri January 18, 2018 Updated January 18, 2018 12:05am

TOKYO >> The Bank of Japan’s Currency Museum in Tokyo mainly exhibits currencies that have been circulated in Japan, including fuhonsen coins said to be the first ever used in the country, toraisen coins imported from China during the medieval period, and oban and koban (large and small gold coins).

The free museum provides an interesting focus on an overlooked piece of daily life. The museum demonstrates that money is a complicated system that has been created through trial and error.

The museum is run by the Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan. It opened in 1985 in commemoration of the bank’s 100th anniversary. The museum exhibits about 3,000 items, including currencies and banknotes.

After entering the museum, visitors will encounter a glittering display of gold coins produced during the Edo period (1603-1867), such as keicho oban, genroku oban and kyoho oban coins. The oval coins, which were often given as gifts, are about 6 inches long and 3.5 inches wide, weighing 5.8 ounces.

Each coin bears a seal inscribed in Indian ink — the signature of the Goto family, who produced the coins. As oban coins without the seal were of lesser value, the seal would be rewritten when the ink faded. The coins’ value was guaranteed by the Goto family and the Edo shogunate, which commissioned their production, and the coins were circulated based on such guarantees.

As gold and silver coins were in short supply during the Edo period, han (domains) across the country issued their own bills. Up through the early Meiji era (1868-1912), more than 200 kinds of han bills were issued, mainly in western Japan. The creditworthiness of a domain determined the value of its bills.

In 1871, the Meiji government established a new currency law and changed the currency unit from ryo to yen. At the time, a one-ryo bill issued by the Shinano Matsushiro domain (Nagano Prefecture) was converted into 0.889 yen, while a one-ryo bill issued by the Satsuma Kagoshima domain (Kagoshima Prefecture) was converted into 0.322 yen. To finance battles during the Meiji Restoration, the Satsuma domain issued so many bills that their actual value was less than the face value.

The museum also features foreign currencies that suffered extreme losses in credibility. After Germany’s defeat in World War I, the country’s Ruhr industrial district was occupied by foreign troops. Germany subsequently experienced rampant inflation, leading to a collapse in the value of the German mark in 1923. The denomination of banknotes increased rapidly, with 100 trillion mark notes entering circulation.

A conspicuously large stone is displayed near a staircase in the museum. The stone is a form of money called rai, which was used on the Micronesian island of Yap.

Rai were used for land and other transactions but were never physically moved; even units that had sunk to the ocean floor were used. Transactions involving the stone money were not recorded. The sense of trust between the seller and buyer is said to have guaranteed the currency’s value.

Source: Star Advertiser
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Offline Bimat

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« Reply #190 on: January 24, 2018, 03:55:23 PM »
Vast selection of coins and medals on display to public for first time

Wednesday, 24 January 2018, 14:49

The National Numismatic Collection, consisting of more than 16,000 coins and medals, is the largest and most diverse found on the island. Heritage Malta’s visitors can view a vast selection of these coins at the National Numismatic Exhibition at the National Museum of Archaeology.

“This valuable collection shows us and reminds us of our country’s eventful and rich past, especially due to its strategic position”, said Minister for Justice, Culture and Local Government Owen Bonnici. “It is therefore a good thing that such a collection is accessible to everyone.”

This collection is continuously being increased with acquisitions and donations. The exhibition is divided periodically and includes the Carthaginians, the Romans, the Medieval millennium, the Order of St John, the French, and the British. Another section includes medals, dies, proofs and accessories, while the minting process is also explained through audiovisual means.

Heritage Malta’s Chairperson Dr Joe Buttigieg said that, “We should also think of those who have contributed to this collection. I have to mention the considerable donation of Prof Salvatore Lugi Pisani in 1899 and Dr Tancred Gouder as well, an ex-archaeology curator and director of the Museum Department who had this collection at heart and made sure to exhibit and increase it through the years.” There was a need for this exhibition to be permanently on show, and it is now accessible to the general public regularly for the first time, as before this exhibition was only accessible via appointment.

Coins started being struck around 650 BC. They provide physical evidence not only of monetary values, but also of other information such as the political import of different periods. Until 1972, Malta mainly used coinage of the various foreign powers occupying the islands. In that year, Malta issued its own currency for the first time. Heritage Malta also displays a number of coins in other museums such as the Domus Romana, the Archaeology Museum in Gozo, and Fort St Elmo. A selection from this collection will eventually be on show in the Grand Master’s Palace as part of the major project of rehabilitation co-financed by the European Union.

Parliamentary Secretary for Consumer Protection and Valletta 2018 was also present for the launch of this exhibition.

The opening hours of the National Museum of Archaeology are from 9.00hrs to17.00hrs until February, and from 9.00hrs to 18.00hrs from March until December. For more information visit www.heritagemalta.org

Source: Independent
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Offline Bimat

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« Reply #191 on: February 25, 2018, 07:35:37 AM »
National Hellenic Museum to showcase impressive Ancient Greek Coins

TornosNews.gr
24.02.2018 | 15:09

A new exhibition at the National Hellenic Museum which will open March 4, will feature the story of coins from early use in ancient Greece to modern times.

Titled “Change: The Story of Coins”, the exhibition will include an interactive display which will showcase how coins are important financial, cultural and political tools.

Visitors will witness the many ways in which Hellenic culture influenced the use, production and design of coins. Themes of mythology, trade of goods, power, imagery and value will be examined across this hands-on exhibit.

“Coins are some of our best records of political, social and economic change. The coins in this exhibition demonstrate the vast reach of the Hellenic world in antiquity,” noted Katherine Kelaidis, Ph.D., Resident Scholar of the National Hellenic Museum.

The exhibition will include 29 coins, which date from the Hellenistic Period to the early Roman period (336 BCE-55 CE). Accompanying these coins will be a section focusing on Alexander the Great’s impact on the spread Hellenism.

“These coins represent a key moment in world history — the period in which Greek customs spread out of the Eastern Mediterranean and become the shared culture of educated people,” Kelaidis added.

The National Hellenic Museum will celebrate the opening of the exhibition with a reception, 2-4 p.m.on March 4th and the show will be on view through February 2019.

Source: Tornos News
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Offline Bimat

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« Reply #192 on: May 03, 2018, 05:29:16 PM »
Paper bills, coins, and money through the ages

Sara Vernekar
MAY 02, 2018 23:41 IST
UPDATED: MAY 02, 2018 23:41 IST

Mumbai: Did you know that newly independent India saved ₹44 lakh by reducing the size of currency notes? It’s an interesting factoid that you learn at when you visit one of the city’s lesser-known museums: the RBI Monetary Museum in Fort.

A ten-minute walk from Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus will take those walking in the right direction to the museum. Perhaps lesser known compared to the grand institution it is affiliated with, the RBI museum opened its doors in 2004, giving a friendly leg-up to Mumbaikars and tourists who want to know more about the incredibly complex history of money in India.

The museum’s exhibits are laid out in six easy-to-navigate sections with helpful yellow arrows on the floor to guide visitors along. Meticulously chronicled on the wall are coins from historical trials and tribulations most of us have only read about in history textbooks: Muhammad bin Tughluq’s attempt to introduce brass and copper tokens in place of silver coins, only to be recalled due to mass forgeries, or Sher Shah Suri’s standardised silver coins that went on to be known as rupees. The museum’s collection of coins numbers over a thousand, starting from 500 B.C. to the present day. Walking around the space, one can’t help but be impressed by man’s ingenuity reflected in all the shapes, money has taken over the years: bracelet money from South East Asia, boat money from China, and porcelain gaming token money from Thailand, all of which make up only a small part of the exhibits.

Coins and history

By laying out the coinage against the backdrop of a timeline, the museum succeeds in showcasing how the coins from each era indicate what the people of that era valued most. One learns, for example, that the coins from the Gupta era were minted to mark the achievements of the rulers.

Look out for the ‘Hundi exhibit’ in section four, which displays the bills of exchange used in the informal financial system at the time. Be warned that younger visitors may start feeling an overload of information at this point.

Luckily, the museum has a kiosk where children – or anyone who likes computer games – can play games that attempt to put an interesting spin on learning about money. However, the endeavour is hampered by tilted screen, making it just above eye level for anyone of average height.

The final two sections of the museum showcase contemporary money and the role of the RBI as sole issuer of Indian currency.

The last section unfortunately is like a textbook, with the functions of the RBI and information on the government’s financial instruments solemnly bidding you farewell on your way out.

The show is on at RBI Monetary Museum, Amar Building, Sir P.M. Road, Fort, 10.45 a.m. to 5.15 p.m, Tuesdays to Sundays. It is closed on Mondays .

Source: The Hindu
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.