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Offline Bimat

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #120 on: January 29, 2012, 08:03:06 AM »
Less than 70 original coins on display at Lahore Museum

By Sonia Malik
Published: January 29, 2012

LAHORE:

The Mughal emperor Akbar would be showered with coins when he entered or exited the palace on his elephant. The coins, popularly known as nisaari sikkay, were scooped up by peasants in the elephant’s trail. The Lahore Museum owns some 1,200 nisaari sikkay, bearing the emperor’s stamp and about an inch in circumference.

But just a few are actually on display at the museum. In fact, only 70 of the thousand or so coins on display are originals. The rest are replicas. The museum stores about 45,000 original coins, dating from 6 BC to 2010 AD, in its reserves.

Naushaba Anjum, the museum’s coin keeper, says insufficient security and lack of interest among visitors are the main reasons that most of the originals are generally kept hidden away. “Most visitors are unaware of the value of these rare, centuries-old artefacts. Otherwise there would be more burglaries,” she said, adding that the museum had the biggest coin collection in the subcontinent.

She recalled the relief among museum staff in 1988 after a burglary in 1998. “They mostly stole replica coins from the Indo-Greek era. The officers were so relieved that the originals were in the reserves,” Anjum said.

She said putting originals on display also increases the risk that they will be damaged. “The best way to share information about the coin collection is to write about them in the museum’s annual bulletin or newspapers,” she said.

“When coin collectors, scholars or students want to study something they get in touch in advance and plan a visit,” she said. A table has been set aside in the reserves room for anyone interested in studying coins.

Anjum said the museum had acquired six collections of coins from various eras over the last ten years, but some coins were not on display because of a lack of technical expertise in producing replicas.

After the 1988 incident, officials imprinted the originals of the stolen coins on plaster of paris and produced new replicas in laboratories. But the replicas produced were not as good as the ones produced during British rule.

“We have displayed some originals because we lack the expertise to make accurate replicas,” said Anjum. “In a way, the replicas in the museum library are also antiquities as they have been on display since long before Partition.”

The recent collections acquired by the museum include 1,200 nisaari coins, 150 Indo-Greek (2 BC) era coins and 20 punch-mark coins (6 AD) purchased in 2006 with the help of a Rs200,000 donation from the Qarshi Group. The same year, the then Parks and Horticulture Authority director general purchased 210 Mughal coins and donated them to the museum, along with some Pakistani coins. Some 214 Mughal coins were donated from Okara. Ten coins of the late Mughal period were donated by the Express news group in 2009. In 2004, a farmer gave the museum 465 copper coins from the reign of Nasir bin Karlik, ruler of Sindh in 13 AD.

A few originals from these donations, such as the 6AD punch-marks and Pakistani coins, are now on display. Earlier, coins from British India between 1849 and 1947 were the only originals on display.

Details of all the coins in the reserves are mentioned in 20 hardcover catalogues lined up against the shelves in Anjum’s office. She added that a lack of funds meant these catalogues had not been published.“They state the mint [region of origin], script and language, date, emperor’s name, year of rule, cultural sign, date of issuance and any poetry written on the coin. Images of both sides of the coins are also included,” she said. Anjum said that the most precious coins in the museum were from the Sikh era, and it owned most of the coins ever found. The reserves have just over 45,000 coins. “They are safe here as only VVIPs are allowed in on state visits. The keys lie in a strong room,” she said.

Source: Tribune
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #121 on: January 31, 2012, 06:22:33 PM »
Hidden Treasures

Corinium Museum, Park Street, GL7 2BX, Cirencester.One of the ten treasures of the Corinium Museum is the Civil War coin hoard. 309 coins were found purely by chance hidden in a lead pipe under a barn in 1981.

http://www.coriniummuseum.cotswold.gov.uk/

Source: BBC
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #122 on: February 14, 2012, 03:17:31 PM »
A treasure of ancient coins

Baishali Adak, Feb 15, 2012 :
Historical pieces

For those who love to study ancient coins, the coin collection at the National Museum in Delhi is nothing less than a treasure trove.

With a whopping 1672 coins on display, the collection amazes one with its variety, rarity and antiquity.

Starting right from the 6th century BC, when coins are believed to have first appeared in India, the collection takes you through the entire history of coinage in the country. Each coin, highly informative and beautiful par excellence, has a story to tell.

Apart from the coins, which are displayed in a modern and user friendly format, the gallery has thoughtfully prepared dioramas to depict various techniques of coin production.  There are wondrous punch marked silver coins. The most interesting ones are the ‘bent-bar’ shaped coins from the Gandhara region, now in Afghanistan.

Then there are the exquisite coins from the Indo-Greek, Parthian and Scythian rule.

A coin bearing the image of Greek ruler Seleucus is eye-catching. The deputy curator of the museum, Dr R K Tiwari, says that the entire history of Greek rule in India has been constructed through coinage.

Next to it, one sees the amazing ‘re-struck’ coins from the Western Kshatrapa rule. Dr Tiwari explains that many rulers appeared in the regions of Maharashtra and Gujarat shortly after one another during this period. Unable to change all the coins of the previous ruler, they would simply get their names and images re-imprinted on them.

The pride of the gallery, however, remains its Kushan and Gupta dynasty gold coin collection. Dr. Tiwari informs, “There’s a very interesting story behind how we acquired our Gupta coins. A long time back, a historian was visiting the Raja of Bharatpur. He noticed that the Raja was wearing these gold coins as coat buttons. On enquiry, the Raja said that they had been found in a pot in the area. All the 638 coins were recovered from the same pot and donated to the National Museum.”

The Mughal coins are stunning with beautiful inscriptions of Quranic verses and rich, narrative content. On one hand, there are Akbar’s ‘Ilahi’ coins, which celebrate his religious ideals, while on the other, there are coins depicting Jehangir drinking a glass of wine. The British coins are as majestic, bearing images of various Viceroys and Queen Elizabeth herself.

One can also see modern Indian coins and currency notes in their many denominations.

The various credit cards, which are put on display, bring one back to the comfort and convenience of today’s age. But the ancient little beauties leave one marveling at the long history of coinage and skilled artisans.

Source: Deccan Herald
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #123 on: April 01, 2012, 12:53:03 PM »
2012 Exhibitions at the National Museum in Cracow
2012-03-16

At The Bishop Erazm Ciołek Palace, the Museum will be presenting an exhibition entitled Numismatic Rarities from the Collections of the National Museum in Krakow (6.04 – 1.07. 2012).
This will be the first opportunity for a number of years to see these most prized and fascinating Polish coins.

An important event for enthusiasts and numismatists alike, the exhibition also aims to augment the ranks of devotees to the field, particularly in view of the fact that plans for 2013 include the opening, after an interval of more than seventy years, of the Emeryk Hutten-Czapski Museum. The first department of the National Museum in Krakow, the Emeryk Hutten-Czapski Museum has been closed since 2009 for modernisation under the auspices of the European Centre of Polish Numisnatics project.

Source: the National Museum in Cracow - http://www.muzeum.krakow.pl/?L=1

Photo caption: National Museum in Cracow - Main Building / photo by Zygmunt Put
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 01:53:35 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #124 on: May 09, 2012, 01:52:32 AM »
The penny that’s worth a mint
Wednesday 9 May 2012

IT’s only a penny, but it must be worth a mint – a rare coin, discovered in the Alnwick area, from the time when Northumberland was ruled by Scotland.

The silver piece was found by Brian Gray while searching with a metal detector, who reported his discovery to the local Portable Antiquities Scheme officer at the Great North Museum: Hancock.

Because Mr Gray found only one coin, it was not declared treasure, and it has been bought by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne for display in the museum.

And not only is it rare, but it’s also in excellent condition.

The coin was minted in Carlisle between 1136 and 1152 for Henry, crown prince of the Scottish throne, who also happened to be the Earl of Northumberland and Huntingdon. At the time of its minting, much of northern England was under Scottish dominion due to the conflict between Stephen and Matilda, the rival claimants to the English throne.

Dr Rob Collins, honorary keeper of coins for the Society of Antiquaries said: “I am thrilled that this penny of Prince Henry will be on display for the public. This was a very exciting period in border history, and this is the first coin of its type to be added to the Antiquaries collection.”

Andrew Parkin, keeper of archaeology at the Great North Museum: Hancock said: “I am very pleased that such an important part of Northumbrian history from a period when this area was under Scottish rule will be shown in the museum.”

Lindsay Allason-Jones, president of the society, said: “Given the current debate about Scottish ties to England, this tiny coin is a timely reminder that Northumberland was once part of Scotland.”

The coin was purchased by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne with the assistance of the V&A Purchase Grant Fund and the Headley Museums Archaeological Acquisition Fund.

It fills a gap in the society’s important coin collection of 5,000-plus coins, which includes the famous denarius of Cleopatra and Mark Antony.

Source: Northumberland Gazette

Photo caption: The rare Prince Henry coin.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline kumarrahul

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #125 on: May 28, 2012, 06:34:59 AM »
Hi all,

I visited Mumbai this weekend and took the opportunity to visit the RBI Monetory Museum.  I had gone with little expectation, but was reasonably impressed with the collection, presentation and information.  The cartoons depicting evolution of money, Role of RBI (RBI and you) are superb and would entice kids to embrace this hobby.  The coins are displayed along with enlarged images and a historical timeline that makes it very interesting.  This museum is truly world class - simple yet elegant.  I've visited the Monnie de Musee at Paris but was not as impressed as with this one in Mumbai (one reason could be lack of familiarity with French history and coinage :-))

Full marks to RBI!! Must visit for numismatists/enthusiasts visiting Mumbai.

Cheers

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #126 on: June 06, 2012, 05:21:05 PM »
Old coins narrate Sino-Tamil story
May 25, 2012

CHENNAI : Post Independence Sino-Indian diplomatic relations may be only a few decades old. However, China and ancient Tamils shared a trade relationship that dates back hundreds of years.
This is amply demonstrated by an expo on ‘Select Coinage of Tamil Nadu’ at the Centenary Exhibition Hall of the Government Museum in Egmore.

An identified coin is a piece of history,” says N Sundrarajan, curator, numismatic section of the Museum, summing up its import. The Museum in Egmore has a collection of three coin hoards from China discovered in Tamil Nadu.

Sundararajan said, “The first hoard of Chinese coins the Museum received was in 1943 from Pattukottai Taluk in then Thanjavur district. It had a collection of 20 square-holed coins dated between 1073 CE to 1237 CE.”
Around 1,822 coins were discovered in 1944 form the second hoard of Chinese coins from Thallikottai, Mannarkudi Taluk in Thanjavur district dated between 713 CE to 1265 CE.

In the third lot are 323 coins discovered in 1962 at Olakkunnatham in Pattukottai Taluk. These coins are dated between 126 BCE to 1241 CE.

He mentioned the presence of a bi-lingual inscription, now in China, dated 1203 CE, perhaps done during the period of the last of the Cholas.

The inscription talk about a person named Samudhara Perumal who made an offering at the Seeru Kanniswaran Udaiyar Kovil for the well-being of a Chinese Emporer named Che-ka-cai-kan.

Some Chinese annals refer to Raja Raja Chola as Lo-t-sa- Lo-t-sa Chu-lien, added the numismatics curator.

These coins give the viewer a sense of the history the ancient Tamil Kingdom shared with the Chinese. Sundarajan said, “Coins are considered the metallic rearview mirrors which reflect our hoary past.”

Other coins on display are some from the Sangam period, Roman coins and coins of the ancient Tamil Kingdoms of the Cheras, Cholas and Pandiyas. The expo is open to the public from 10 am to 4.30 pm till May 24.

Source: IBN Live
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #127 on: August 10, 2012, 12:37:43 AM »
Nagapattinam archaeological museum to be relocated
Aug 8, 2012

NAGAPATTINAM: The archaeological museum, housing many rare ancient objects would be relocated to a new building, district collector T Munusamy said here on Tuesday.

Speaking to reporters after inspecting the museum, he said it had rare collections of paintings, numismatic objects, bronze and stone sculptures, biological specimen, ancient musical instruments and several other artefacts.

The museum is now located in an old British-era building. "Considering the value of the articles, as a precautionary measure, the museum will be relocated to a new building," he said.

Source: Times of India
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #128 on: August 26, 2012, 02:25:26 PM »
Museum in the money with gold coin hoard
Andrew Dickens, 24/08/2012

A rare Iron Age coin hoard is on its way to St Neots Museum after a last-minute fundraising appeal secured £22,000 in grants and donations.

The museum, in New Street, will make its biggest-ever purchase when 68 gold coins – discovered by a metal detector in Kimbolton in October 2010 – arrive next year.

The British Museum in London had given the museum’s curator Liz Davies a deadline of the end of July to raise the £22,000 purchase price before the coins were sold on the open market.

After launching an appeal at the start of July, the museum landed £11,000 from the V&A Museum Purchase Grant Fund and a string of donations from residents and community groups. It has now been awarded a £6,000 grant from the Headley Museum’s Archaeological Acquisition Fund, making up the outstanding amount of money.

Liz described the purchase as a “great success for the museum”.
She said: “The museum would like to thank everyone who has helped us to achieve our fundraising target.
“It is really great to be able to keep this wonderful Celtic treasure in the local area.

“We will now be focusing on preparing a Heritage Lottery Grant application to redisplay our gallery about the early history of St Neots.” The proposed upgrade will include a high security case for the coin hoard, an off-site storage facility and a transformation of the Old Court Room into a community and learning space.

The collection was declared treasure trove at an inquest in Huntingdon last year and was sent to the British Museum. The hoard came from South Lincolnshire between Caesar’s invasion of England in 55BC and the conquest by Claudius in AD43.

A detailed list of major donors is expected to be released soon and further details about when the coin hoard will be on display will be discussed at the next museum management committee meeting in early September. Details about events and activities to celebrate the purchase will be released in the autumn.

Source: Cambridge News
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #129 on: September 11, 2012, 12:42:57 AM »
8300 citizens visit Governmental Palace
By M.ZOLJARGAL

The State Ceremony and Honour’s Hall (Ulan Bator) have been open to the public for nine days. Over 8,300 local and foreign people have visited the Governmental Palace and seen the exhibition so far. Out of over 2,000 exhibits of the State History Museum, selected 150 were displayed at the hall. One of the most magnificent exhibits was undoubtedly a copper coin of Guyug Khan, which is the only one which exists in the whole world.

A great number of foreigners and local residents have been visiting the hall. Senior citizen of Dornod Province, D.Puntsag, stated, “It’s my very first time visiting the State Governmental Palace of Mongolia. I’m feeling delighted. Many scarce artifacts of historical significance are being displayed here. I hope there will be more artifacts when I visit this hall next time.” A tourist from the USA, Robert Longo, claimed “I’m very delighted to see the monument of Chinggis Khan so close. Though the local guides aren’t explaining artifacts in English, I can understand as the introduction and information about them is written in English. The White House of our country is open to the public too.”

People will be able to visit Government Palace and the hall from 9.30 to 17.00 o’clock everyday but Monday. The Chief of the State Ceremony Department, J.Sereejav, claimed, “The citizens are expressing their honour for the Chinggis Khan Monument and seeing the exhibits which symbolize Mongolian state history. They seemed to be very glad to be able to pray in front of the Nine White Banners.

Until the new year, museum artifacts will be changed every month. Also, finds and artifacts, stored at the Institute of Archaeology in the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, of Khitan and Hunnu Era will be displayed at the hall in late September.

Source: UB Post
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #130 on: September 11, 2012, 01:30:35 AM »
Coin and banknote exhibition

On 21 August 2012 a new permanent coin exhibition opened in Danmarks Nationalbank's lobby (Copenhagen).

The exhibition is a beautiful and inviting set up of Danish coins produced from 1818 to 2012. It is a result of collaboration between the former director for the coin production Hans Denkov and the architect Teit Weylandt.

Banknotes have been displayed in the corridor between the lobby and the banking hall since the building was taken into use in 1976-1978. With the new exhibition it is possible for the public to see both coins and banknotes displayed in Danmarks Nationalbank.

The exhibition is open for the public during the opening hours of Danmarks Nationalbank Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Source: Danmark's Nationalbank
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Coinsforever

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #131 on: September 11, 2012, 10:44:23 AM »
Coin and banknote exhibition

On 21 August 2012 a new permanent coin exhibition opened in Danmarks Nationalbank's lobby (Copenhagen).



Simply awesome !

Displays are attractive.

Cheers ;D
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #132 on: September 11, 2012, 12:51:54 PM »
Also see here: http://news.coinupdate.com/national-bank-of-denmark-inaugurates-new-permanent-coin-gallery-1563/ Several images on that page can be enlarged, by clicking on a photo ...

Christian

Offline Coinsforever

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #133 on: September 12, 2012, 02:38:36 AM »
I'm adding few more  photos for posterity :

 Denmark National Bank's section of floor displaying coins & banknotes.

















Cheers ;D
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #134 on: October 16, 2012, 10:59:13 PM »
Chola coins on display at city museum
September 18, 2012 By Raman Sankaran
(Raman is a Chennai-based numismatist).

Rajendra Chola I was the son of Raja Raja Chola I and one of the greatest rulers of the Tamil Chola dynasty of India. He succeeded his father in 1014 CE as the Chola emperor.

During his reign, he extended the influence of the already vast Chola empire up to the banks of the river Ganga in the north and across the ocean.

Rajendra’s territories extended to coastal Burma, Srivijaya (Sumatra, Java and Malay peninsula in southeast Asia) and Pegu islands. Burma and Indo-China were subordinate to the Cholas till Kulothunga I’s reign.

Rajendra defeated Mahipala, the Pala king of Bengal and Bihar, and to commemorate the victory, built a new capital called Gangaikonda Cholapuram.

He also built a Siva temple at Gangaikonda Cholapuram, similar to the Thanjavur Brihadisvara temple.

He assumed titles like Parakesari and issued gold, silver and copper coins in the denomination of kazhinju, madai and kasu.

He used Tamil Grantham and Devanagari legends on his coins. He also issued many commemorative coins with his titles Yuddhamalla, Uthama Chola, Maturantakan, Mudikonda Cholan, Rajendraka and Gangai Konda Cholan, on special occasions.

Since the Cholas ruled for more than 275 years, starting from Raja Raja I to Kulthonga III (985 CE – 1256 CE), almost all Chola kings issued coins.

As a part of Chennai museum’s special exhibit this week, coins on display were issued by Rajendran Chola I with the title Gangaikonda Chola.

In the coin, both sides are similar; on top of the coin there is a parasol flanked by two flywhisks, in the centre, a bow, a seated tiger and two fish flanked by two lamps, and at the bottom Nagari legend ‘Gangaikonda Chola’.

Since Rajendra Chola I ruled from TN–Orissa, Nagari, the common language of that period, was used in the coins. The symbol above the Nagari script is also available in the seals of the copper plates.

These symbols may be the royal symbols of the Cholas. Regrettably, so far, no Chola coin has been found with complete Tamil legend.

Source: Deccan Chronicle
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.