Author Topic: Holiday guide - museums  (Read 94065 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28 236
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #105 on: July 26, 2011, 12:51:44 PM »
History and beauty lessons at the Numismatic Museum
By Iota Sykka, Tuesday July 26, 2011   

While the riddle of the Greek debt dominates conversations, temperatures are rising and the atmosphere on Panepistimiou Street in central Athens* is decidedly stuffy.

But here’s a chance to change your mood and take a journey back in time. The year is 1881, when German architect Ernst Ziller built a marvelous residence, known as the Iliou Melathron**, for his friend, the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann.

Inside the restored building which now houses the Numismatic Museum of Athens, you can picture the day when elegantly dressed members of high society would gather on the mansion’s arched terraces to admire floor mosiacs made by Italian artisans and walls covered by murals depicting scenes of life in Pompei. All around the building were elegantly decorated ceilings, including the residence’s master bedrooms -- the private quarters of Schliemann and his spouse, Sophia Engastromenou, 30 years his junior and whose marriage to the German expatriate had been the result of matchmaking.

The building -- which at the time of its construction had cost the formidable sum of 439,650 drachmas -- became a point of reference for the city’s social and cultural life all the way up to the beginning of 20th century. It was sold to the Greek state in 1926 and subsequently housed the Supreme Administrative Court and the Supreme Court.

Every Tuesday at noon, the Numismatic Museum offers history lessons through the prism of money and its myths, but also on the mansion and its celebrated residents.

“Myth and Coins,” is the subject of a guided tour scheduled for Tuesday, July 26, followed by “Before Coins” on August 2, “Coins at Times of Crisis and Prosperity” on August 9 and “Iliou Melathron: an Exquisite 19th-Century Residence,” on August 16, among others.

A visit to the Numismatic Museum might throw light on the meaning of the term “strong currency” or how ancient Greek coins were actually made. Things may get very exciting when comparisons are made between the past and the present: An Athenian soldier’s hourly wage was set at 3 obols in the 5th century BC, while the daily wage of an untrained workman was an Attic drachma and a housewife had to pay three obols for three cotylae (828 ml) of olive oil.

Last year’s guided tours pilot program proved successful, even in August, and the museum is hoping it will again prove a hit with visitors this year, even though local institutions are suffering due to staff shortages and a lack of funding.

In the meantime, the museum’s upcoming temporary exhibition, “The Cost of Nutrition,” will focus on the prices of products from antiquity to the present. Afterward, it will travel to the Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage, which is housed at the Bank of Cyprus in Nicosia, in February next year.

Back in Athens, the Numismatic Museum is also preparing for the display of the so-called Abdera Hoard, a rare collection of ancient coins which were repatriated following a donation by an American collector who had purchased the items in New York in 2000. This exhibition is expected to open in November.

Numismatic Museum, Iliou Melathron, 12 Panepistimiou. For reservations, call 210.364.3774 or 210.363.2057.

Source: Ekathimerini

* see also reply #16
** Ilion palace
« Last Edit: July 26, 2011, 01:03:17 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 257
  • Mumbai, India.
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #106 on: August 01, 2011, 10:16:56 AM »
Pune's archaeology museum, a window into our heritage
Published: Monday, Aug 1, 2011, 12:50 IST
By Rajesh Rao | Place: Pune | Agency: DNA

The archaeology museum in Pune is a perfect place to generate an interest about the subject among schoolchildren and emphasise the need to protect our heritage structures and excavation sites, said Bhaskar Deotare, head of department, department of archaeology, Deccan College Post Graduate and Research Institute, (DCPGRI).

Developed for academic purpose, the museum at the department of archaeology at Deccan College has a large collection of artefacts.

“Started in 1939, the museum today has the finest collection of stone tools from prehistoric period and from different parts of peninsular India. Due to various archaeological explorations and excavations carried out by the department, the present museum has grown into a huge collection of artefacts categorised in nine different galleries,” said Deotare while speaking with DNA.

He encouraged city schools to adopt the guided tours of the museum for school and college students, as part of their cross-curricular programme.The nine galleries of the museum are divided into the following categories: Stone Age or prehistoric period (before 6000 BC); Chalcolithic or Copper Age (4500-3500 BC); Megalithic culture; Early historical; Sculptures; Epigraphy (inscriptions) & Numismatics (study of coins and related objects); Sciences in archaeology, Ethnoarchaeology (study of people for archaeological reasons) and Professor HD Sankalia Memorial Galleria, which houses the contribution of the founder of the department of archaeology, Prof Sankalia, to Indian archaeology.

Reader in environmental archaeology at the department of archaeology, Pandurang Sabale said that the museum preserves the legacy of humanity and its environment, for the purpose of education, study and enjoyment of visitors.

Source: DNA India
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 257
  • Mumbai, India.
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #107 on: August 16, 2011, 08:33:36 AM »
Government Museum: Chennai

The website can be found here.

The numismatic section's link: http://www.chennaimuseum.org/draft/gallery/04/num.htm

Click on 'coins' at the bottom of the page to see images of some splendid Indian coins. 8)

The website also has a database of medals and stamps.

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28 236
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #108 on: August 28, 2011, 06:22:24 PM »
Central Bank Museums to reopen next weekend
August 26, 2011

The downtown San José (Costa Rica) complex that includes the Pre-Columbian Gold Museum and the Numismatic Museum has been closed for two months to upgrade its lighting system.

The Central Bank Museums in San José will reopen Sept. 3 after a two-month closure to complete work on a new lighting system, the group announced in a press release.

Although the system’s new LED lights will not be installed until the end of September, the museums decided to reopen ahead of schedule due to “considerable demand” for their services during this time of year, the press release said. However, some closures during the month of September to complete electrical work are “probable” and will be announced in advance, the statement added.

Work on the lighting system began in May and includes installation of a state-of-the-art, energy-efficient lighting system for the museums’ exhibits. The upgrade cost ₡346 million ($692,000), according to the press release.

Located beneath Plaza de la Cultura in downtown San José, the Central Bank Museums complex includes the Pre-Columbian Gold Museum, the Numismatic Museum and a gallery for temporary exhibits, as well as a gift shop offering pre-Columbian-inspired jewelry and indigenous handicrafts.

The museums’ hours are 9:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission prices are ₡1,500 ($3) for nationals and residents, ₡5,500 ($11) for foreign visitors and free for children under 12 and students with ID. Admission is free for nationals and residents on Wednesdays.

For information and updates on the upgrade work and possible closures, call 2243-4219 or visit www.museosdelbancocentral.org or the museums’ Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MBCCR.

Source: Tico Times
« Last Edit: August 28, 2011, 06:28:02 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 257
  • Mumbai, India.
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #109 on: September 08, 2011, 06:46:54 PM »
Corp Bank's heritage museum, a treasure of financial knowledge

MANGALORE, SEPT. 8:

Showcasing old coins to the present day financial inclusion initiatives of the Government will be the focus area for improving the founder's house of Corporation Bank in Udupi, according to Mr Ramnath Pradeep, Chairman and Managing Director of the bank.

The bank has converted the house of the founder president of the bank, Mr Haji Abdullah Saheb, into a heritage museum.

FINANCIAL TEMPLE

Showcasing the heritage museum to a group of journalists from Mangalore at Udupi on Thursday, Mr Pradeep said aim of the bank is to make the heritage museum the ‘financial temple' for the people visiting the temple town of Udupi. The heritage museum will be developed as a tourist spot for the pilgrims visiting the town, he said.

The heritage museum provides information about banking history since its inception in 1906. The bank was started in the house of Haji Abdullah Saheb with a capital of Rs 5,000 in the form of a ‘nidhi' on March 12, 1906, in the name of Canara Banking Corporation Udipi Ltd. Stating that the museum has a good collection of coins from across the world, Mr Pradeep said the bank wants to improve the coin collection in the museum. It will approach coin collectors in this regard, he said.

COIN COLLECTION

The employee of the bank, Mr Radhakrishna Kumble, who has put 25 years of his coin collection on display at the museum, said around 1,360 coins of different periods and different countries are on display at the museum. The current market value of these coins will be around Rs 42 lakh, he said. Mr Pradeep said the museum showcases the evolution of banking, banking instruments, records, bank notes and currency.

Solar lighting system has been used for the electrification of the entire building, he said.

Apart from the heritage museum, the building also has a financial research centre, financial inclusion resource centre, and financial literacy and credit counselling centre.

The financial inclusion resource centre showcases the initiatives taken by Union Government and RBI on allied products and services, he added.

Source: Business Line

See also Reply #92 above
« Last Edit: September 08, 2011, 08:46:36 PM by Figleaf »
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Coinsforever

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 258
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #110 on: September 11, 2011, 12:17:41 AM »
Beijing Ancient Coin Museum

Deshengmen embrasured watchtower is one of the two embrasured watchtowers of Beijing inner city in Ming and Qing Dynasties that preserved till present. In history, it was called as military gate and is the important entrance of Beijing to Saibei. In Zhongtong 14th Year of Ming Dynasty (the year 1449), the national hero, Yu Qian safeguard Beijing and took Deshengmen as the main battlefield. In Chongzhen 17th Year (the year 1664), Li Zicheng led his peasant army successful entered into Beijing in this place.

 

Deshengmen embrasured watchtower stands upright in the high circumvallation. Its total height is 31.9 meters. On August 1979, Deshengmen embrasured watchtower was published and listed as Beijing City's Key Cultural Relic Unit. It was refreshed in 1980 and welcomed the tourists to visit there.

 

In 1993, the country provided the fund to reconstruct the Zhenwu Temple at the Wucheng of Deshengmen. Moreover, Beijing Ancient Coin Museum was built there. It is the sole one coin museum in Beijing area that opened to the out world. It exhibits Chinese ancient coin in different dynasties through the entire years.

 

Moreover, it also holds temporary exhibition, which is the ideal activity place for the coin collecting peoples to research, collect and interchange.

 

Beijing Ming and Qing Dynasties circumvallation was built continuously and completed on the basis of Yuandadu. The exhibition displays the original features of Beijing City in the past. There are also exhibitions of the material objects like signal cannons and door locks etc.

 

Nearly thousand coins are displayed in the museum that ranges from the ""shell coin" in Yinshang Period to paper currency of Zhiyuan Current Money in Beisong Dynasty, and further to the copper round coin in the Republic of China. The various kinds of coins reflect the politics, economy and social reform at that time. It reappeared the history features.

 

Address: Deshengmen Jianlou, Beierhuan, Xicheng District, Beijing.

 

Telephone: 010 – 62018073

 

Open Time: 08:30-16:30

 

Admission: 4 yuan (US$0.5)

 

Bus Route: Bus Nos. 44, 5, 55 and 345 or by underground railway, and get off at Jishuitan Station.

Source :Beijing Ancient Coin Museum 
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

Offline Coinsforever

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 258
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #111 on: September 11, 2011, 12:22:49 AM »
Virtual Money Museum

The MoneyMuseum is the Museum's platform of the Sunflower Foundation. The foundation was established in 1999 by Dr. Jürg Conzett. Its aim is to expand the knowledge and the exchange of money, its history, significance and function and thus to promote the individual and social understanding of economic connections.

This aim is pursued by the Sunflower Foundation with all its platforms, activities and products. Go to the foundation's website and you will learn more.


Source :moneymuseum
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 257
  • Mumbai, India.
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #112 on: November 07, 2011, 08:33:08 AM »
From clay seals to cashless economy

By Maria Waqar
Published: November 7, 2011

To investigate the turbulent and complex history of the sub-continent — the warring rulers, myriad conquests and royal intrigues — seems like a daunting task.

However, one can simply examine one thing to uncover a Pandora box of chronological details: the history of money in the region. The changing inscriptions on coins alludes to the rise and fall of rulers and kings, the switch from coins to paper currency signifies a leap in technological advancement and the use of money stamps is testimony to the unavailability of paper currency during times of war.

And this history of monetisation— recounted through a treasure trove of cowrie shells, coins, stamps and notes — is showcased in the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) Museum & Art Gallery (Karachi.) This pink sandstone structure with looming window shutters and jumbo doors was inaugurated on July 1, and previously housed the Bank of India before partition and the SBP’s library.  Inside the mammoth colonial structure, with a refurnished interior boasting spangling spotlights and a renovated brass and glass skylight, are neatly organised sections displaying the history of money over the millennia.

Chronology of money

Perhaps the most interesting section of this museum is the coinage section, neatly divided into pre-Islamic and Islamic periods. The pre-Islamic display starts with the punchmarked coins used by Greeks and Aryan invaders dating back to the 6th and 7th century BC.  The currency of this epoch is conspicuous for the Hellenistic trait of bearing the imprint of the ruling monarch’s portrait.

The chronological exhibit gives way to the second section  showcasing coinage from the ‘Islamic period of India and Pakistan’ – a misleading description since Pakistan did not exist till 1947 and non-Muslim influences remained strong in the entire sub-continent even after invasions by Muslim rulers. On display are the copper, gold and silver currencies of the all-too familiar Muslim conquerors of history books — the Ghaznavids, the Ghauris and the Mughals etc. The changing shape, symbols and language on the coins attest to the sub-continent’s turbulent political past. Interestingly, when new invaders successfully captured an area, they used the coins of the old conquerors before introducing their own, but overstriked their own names and symbols on them.

As fascinating as this linear trajectory of money is, it does not add anything radically new to the viewer’s knowledge. In fact the exhibited currency, which matches the timeline of most textbooks in Pakistan, highlights that the complex history of the sub-continent is always confined to simple timelines and neat linear paths.

Artifacts and art work

Apart from the sequential record of currency, the SBP museum houses fascinating historical artifacts and art work. There’s the country’s first ATM machine on display; first employed by Habib Bank in 1988, it closely resembles a photocopying machine. There’s also coin-minting apparatus — a cumbersome green object with a wheel-like posterior — and a 100-year-old gold-weighing scale, refurbished with golden paint.

The second storey of the museum’s building houses a small art gallery showcasing the works of the renowned rebel artist, Sadequain, and a few other contemporary artists such as Marium Khan and Amir Hasan Rizvi.  Sadequain’s murals, originally made for the SBP, are majestic illustrations depicting distorted life-sized figures, whose coarse texture comes from the fine lines etched into the paint by a blade.

The museum, displaying lengthy historical descriptions and staffed with trained tour guides, is the first of its kind in Pakistan and is now open for public viewing.

Source: The Express Tribune

(Click on the link to see some photos)

Image 1: Coin minting apparatus used in the early 20th century.

Image 2: The first ATM machine ever used in Pakistan. It was used by Habib Bank in 1988.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2011, 01:46:09 PM by Figleaf »
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 257
  • Mumbai, India.
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #113 on: November 29, 2011, 01:40:26 PM »
Singapore Coins and Notes Museum finds new home
 

The newly relocated Singapore Coins and Notes Museum opened on Tuesday. It is Singapore's first and only museum dedicated to exhibiting currency.

The museum houses three galleries, which are organised in chronological order, starting with the currency used in pre-independent Singapore to modern-day Singapore in the first and second galleries respectively.

The third gallery houses the most interactive elements and visitors can try minting their very own coin with a traditional minting machine.

The museum also offers free guided tours on a regular basis.

Source: Straits Times
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28 236
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #114 on: January 01, 2012, 10:54:08 PM »
National Hellenic Museum, 1st US museum dedicated to Greek culture, opens in Chicago
December 27, 2011

CHICAGO — Dolls a Greek woman made during World War II. Ice cream bowls and wooden spoons from a 1940s Greek candy store. Thousands of record albums filled with Greek music.

These items and many other beloved objects and family heirlooms have found their way from around the country to the National Hellenic Museum in Chicago, which has a new place to store and exhibit them all, in a four-story 40,000-square-foot environmentally friendly building of limestone and glass that opened in early December.

The $20 million project in the city’s Greektown neighborhood, which includes temporary and permanent exhibition space, classrooms, oral history archives, a library and roof patio overlooking downtown, replaces the museum’s previous space a few blocks away on one floor of a four-story building.

“This museum became by default the repository for artifacts from the Greek American experience because there was no other place people felt secure donating their items,” said Stephanie Vlahakis, the museum’s executive director.

Outside the museum, the street bustles with diners at Greek restaurants like The Parthenon, Athena or Santorini. A group of men speak Greek during an animated game of backgammon at the Panhellenic Pastry Shop with mounds of powdered sugar almond cookies and baklava piled in the glass cases behind the counter.

“We are telling the story of Greek America,” Vlahakis said. “We just start from the beginning, from ancient times and bring it to the modern times.”

The museum is a work in progress, with a skeleton version of the permanent exhibit on the second floor. Curators have scribbled design concepts in colored marker on the walls, like “absolutely want mosaic work” or “look into etching on glass?” The hope is to raise enough money to fill the displays out in a year.

But there is still plenty to see: shelves filled with items from a Greek family in New York, a wall of black and white pictures that chronicles the story of Greek immigrants in America and an area to learn the Greek alphabet. Visitors can watch a short introductory video narrated by, who else, George Stephanopoulos.

Museum curator Bethany Fleming hopes to travel to Greece and make casts of columns, gates and parts of temples to bring back to Chicago.

Downstairs the temporary exhibit space is home to “Gods, Myths and Mortals: Discover Ancient Greece,” an exhibit on loan from the Children’s Museum of Manhattan until August. It’s a child’s view of the daily life of ancient Greece and its legends and heroes, like Aristotle, Odysseus and Cyclops.

“What we want to do with all our exhibits is create a place where all generations of visitors can connect,” Fleming said.

There’s a kid-sized recreated Greek temple, and children can dress up in togas in front of a mirror or crawl into a jungle-gym Trojan horse. Interspersed are nearly three dozen Greek artifacts, including coins, pottery and figurines. One Macedonian drachma coin dates to 336-323 B.C. and is about the size of a dime.

The museum building itself is inspired by nature, containing elements of earth, air, fire and water. Inside a large, sky-lit stairway leads visitors from east to west, symbolizing the travel of Greek immigrants from Europe to America. Everything, Vlahakis says, was done deliberately to parallel the Greek American experience.

“So much of our world is inspired by the ancient,” she said.

Source: Washington Post

Photo caption: ( National Hellenic Museum / Associated Press ) - This undated photo courtesy of National Hellenic Museum shows the exterior of the new 40,000-square-foot National Hellenic Museum in Chicago’s Greektown neighborhood. The new four-story, green building of limestone and glass opened in early December.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28 236
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #115 on: January 09, 2012, 12:37:56 AM »
800 year collection arrives in Mongolia
By E.Oyun-Erdene, 9 JAN 2012

Ulan Bator The Ministry of Education, Culture and Science bought 52 pieces of coins which is with stamps and names of ancient khans and the first banknote which emitted in Yuan State period. Coin collector, chronologist and scientist B.Nyamaa bought these ancient rare coins and banknotes from an international auction. The banknote of Yuan State is very rare in the world and there is no banknote of Yuan State left in Mongolia. This is the first time that a joint venture between the Government and The Ministry of Education, Culture and Science bought historical documents.
Mongolia is considered to have created the first bank note in the world.

The Yuan State’s banknote was created in 1287 by the order of Khubilai Khan. When there was an economical crisis, Khubilai Khan ordered to create the banknote which is equal to coins and this helped to limit the inflation. The banknote was written in Mongolian and Chinese and confirmed by the stamp of the Khan. Researchers said that this banknote costs over USD 200 thousand at the international auction. The coin collector B.Nyamaa also gave a precious collection of 52 pieces of ancient rare coins. This collection is with the stamps and names of 24 khans Ugudei, Guyeg, Munkh, Arigbukh and it is considered as very uncommon in the world.

The Minister of Education, Culture and Science, Yo.Otgonbayar, is spearheading the movement to revive the historical heritages of Mongolia. During the exhibition “Chinggis Khaan,” which was held in National Historical Museum, the banknote of Yuan State was brought in by invitation. Some people said “Why is such an important legacy not in Mongolia?”

Head of the Culture's Policy Department of the Ministry of Education Culture and Science, B. Naranzun said, “Coin collector, chronologist and scientist B.Nyamaa said “This is one of my precious collections. If the State wants to take my collection its own protection, I will give it by bargaining.”  The council agreed on the price and the 52 coins were bought for 230 million MNT. The collection memorializes the fact that Mongolia published the first banknotes.

Source: Mongol News
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Coinsforever

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 258
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #116 on: January 21, 2012, 12:13:56 PM »
X-ray of rare Shiva statue surprises Amsterdam museum


Nevada (US), Jan 9 (ANI): Prestigious Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam recently conducted an X-ray of its thousand-year-old monumental Shiva-Nataraja statue as a part of research and was surprised to know that it was cast in solid bronze.

Hollow sculptures have reportedly been a common practice in Europe since the Greek Antiquity. The museum discovered that even the aureole and the demon under Shiva's feet were also solid.

Distinguished Hindu statesman Rajan Zed has applauded Rijksmuseum for its interest in Hindu artifacts.

This Dancing Shiva statue was X-rayed using high-energy digital radiation, along with the lorry transporting it, in the most powerful X-ray tunnel for containers of the Rotterdam customs authority, normally used to scan sea containers for suspicious contents. It is said to be the first research of its kind on a museological masterpiece.

At 153 cm x 114.5 cm, this 300 kilograms Shiva statue is claimed to be the largest known bronze statue from the Chola Dynasty kept in a museological collection outside of India. "This solid bronze Shiva is evidence of a high level of mastery of bronze casting", a Museum release says.

Zed, who is President of Universal Society of Hinduism, in a statement in Nevada (USA) today, urged the major museums of world to acquire more Hindu sculpture and art; dedicate permanent space to Hindu artefacts; and organize more exhibitions of Hindu art, sculptures, and architecture to make the present and future generations aware about their richness.

Rajan Zed argued that because of their richness and other factors, Hindu artefacts were becoming a favourite of museums in America and the West. Many prestigious museums already owned Hindu sculptures and other artefacts and many were planning to acquire them.

Even some formations in world famous Grand Canyon National Park of USA were named as Shiva Temple, Krishna Shrine, Vishnu Temple, Rama Shrine, Brahma Temple (7851 feet), and Hindu Amphitheatre, Zed pointed out.

According to Rajan Zed, various renowned museums in USA which have acquired statues and other artefacts of Hindu deities include Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California; Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, California; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond; Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California; Museum of Art and Archaeology in University of Missouri-Columbia, Missouri; Mingei International Museum in San Diego, California; American Museum of Natural History, New York; Philadelphia Museum of Art in Pennsylvania; Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland; Dallas Museum of Art, Texas; Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri; etc.

Zed further says that other prestigious world museums, which possess statues of Hindu deities, include British Museum in London, United Kingdom; Musae Guimet in Paris, France; Museum for Asiatische Kunst in Berlin, Germany; Te Papa Museum in Wellington, New Zealand; Beijing World Art Museum, China; National Museum in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada; Victoria and Albert Museum in London, United Kingdom; etc. Thailand reportedly has a private Ganesha Museum.

Rajan Zed asked foremost art museums of the world, including Musee du Louvre and Musee d'Orsay of Paris, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Los Angeles Getty Center, Uffizi Gallery of Florence (Italy), Art Institute of Chicago, Tate Modern of London, Prado Museum of Madrid (Spain), National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, etc., to frequently organize Hindu art focused exhibitions, thus sharing the rich Hindu art heritage with the rest of the world.

The Rijksmuseum is the national museum of the Netherlands, whose collection comprises 1.1 million objects dating from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Its history goes back to 1800 and it attracts about 900,000 visitors each year. A. Ruys is Chair while Anna Slaczka is curator of South Asian Art of this Museum which contains many stone and bronze sculptures from India.

Zed said that art had a long and rich tradition in Hinduism and ancient Sanskrit literature talked about religious paintings of deities on wood or cloth. Hinduism, oldest and third largest religion of  the world, has about one billion adherents and moksh (liberation) is its ultimate goal.(ANI)

Source: yahooinnews
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

Offline kansal888

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 460
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #117 on: January 23, 2012, 03:37:11 AM »
Dear Friends

You might be aware that the Reserve Bank of India opened a monetary museum few years back.

"The RBI Monetary Museum aims at documenting and preserving numismatic heritage. The Museum proposes to put in place permanent, temporary and itinerant exhibits of the representative coinage of India, paper currency, gold bars as well as financial instruments and curiosities down the ages".

The museum is in Mumbai (I am yet to visit it). An online version is also available
http://www.rbi.org.in/scripts/mc_gallery.aspx

Now RBI has decided to open a second museum in Kolkata. Lets wait and see how the museum is developed.

Regards
Sanjay Kansal
« Last Edit: January 23, 2012, 05:03:19 AM by kansal888 »

Offline kansal888

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 460
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #118 on: January 23, 2012, 03:47:38 AM »
BTW..I came across another website which claims that Kolkata's old mint complex (Silver Mint on Strand Road) will also be converted into a museum and hotel. This project is different from RBI's project. I dont know if there is any connection between RBI's Museum and Mint's Museum.

http://kolkatamint.com/Home.html

This website demands donation. Both SPMCIL as well as RBI are cash rich organizations. I dont feel they will ever beg for donations. Therefore I am skeptical about this project. 

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 257
  • Mumbai, India.
Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #119 on: January 27, 2012, 05:47:05 PM »
Finland commemorates the end of the markka

Author: Catherine Snowdon
Source: Central Banking | 27 Jan 2012

[...]

The Bank of Finland Museum (Helsinki) has also launched a new exhibition based on the book, which will run until December 30, 2012.

Displays of proposals for the banknote draft competitions held in 1947 and 1982 can be viewed in the museum, while a multimedia presentation shows all Finnish markka-denominated banknote types used in Finland since the Second World War.

For those unable to get to the museum in person, a virtual tour of the exhibition can be taken on the Bank of Finland Museum's website.

[...]

Source: Central Banking
« Last Edit: January 27, 2012, 06:09:37 PM by Bimat »
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.