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Sweden: Gröna Lund amusement park, Stockholm

Started by FosseWay, December 13, 2012, 04:57:38 PM

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FosseWay

Here are a couple of tokens from Lisebergs poor relation  :P, Gröna Lund in Stockholm.

The brass one is 23.2 mm, 4.76 g and simply reads 'winning token'; it carries no denomination.

The whiter-looking one (looks like Soviet/Yugoslav copper-nickel-zinc) one is 26.2 mm, 8.43 g. This appears to carry a denomination 5 but it's not entirely clear what it's worth 5 of. The general look of the token is too modern for it to be 5 öre. It could be 5 kronor -- the token's colour, size and weight are reminiscent of the 5 kronor coin but sufficiently different not to be confused with it in circulation. Or it could be 5 turns, 5 points etc. No idea what the T stands for.

Any ideas on dating would be very welcome.

Figleaf

And another.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Prosit

Tivoli always gets my attention because of a medal by Helmut Zobl that I have coveted for a long time and not been able to acquire.

Is that a circus? A city? is there A circus/Amusement park in the city?

Dale

FosseWay

As I understand it, the original Tivoli pleasure gardens are the ones in Copenhagen. The name was then appropriated for other similar establishments in Denmark and neighbouring countries (certainly Sweden and Finland; I presume also Norway, though I have no Tivoli tokens from there). So rather like using 'hoover' or 'jiffy bag' for vacuum cleaners or padded envelopes in general.

Figleaf

Tivioli doesn't really sound Danish. The original refers to the gardens of the villa d'Este in the Italian town of Tivoli. The name moved to Paris, where it was a park. From there, it moved to Copenhagen in 1843, where it is the archetype of what Americans would call a "theme park".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Prosit

Thanks for the information.
here is the medal I was referring to.

Dale