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Fractional sub-units

Started by <k>, December 10, 2012, 09:26:39 PM

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<k>

#15


South Africa, farthing.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#16


South Africa, pre-decimal half penny.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Since we still do not have 1/10 cent coins to pay our gas bills accurately ;) I cannot think of any modern example from around here. But if we can go back a few years ...



And here for example is a 1/4 stüber piece. (60 stüber were one taler, I think.)

Christian

Figleaf

Plenty of those around. More in the former colonies.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

maxmissy

Look at this french necessity token from Nantes bakers ( Nantes is a town in Britany )
1/4 décime = 2,5 centimes


ciscoins

Russian Empire, 1/8 of a kopek ("pol polushki")
Ivan
Moscow, Russia

ciscoins

Russian Empire, 1/4 of a kopek (in previous years known as "polushka")
Ivan
Moscow, Russia

<k>

#22
French Indo-China, ½ cent, 1938.jpg

French Indo-China, ½ cent, 1935.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

FosseWay

The Straits Settlements (now Singapore and parts of Malaysia) had ¼ and ½ cent coins issued by all three issuing authorities (EIC, the British Indian government and the Straits government). Unfortunately my examples are in rather poor condition and don't scan well.

malj1

United Kingdom, quarter, third and half farthings.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Bimat

Portugal has issued ¼ Euro (gold) coins, those are not intended for circulation though. ;)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

chrisild

Quote from: Bimat on December 15, 2012, 07:41:00 AM
Portugal has issued ¼ Euro (gold) coins, those are not intended for circulation though. ;)

Right, and France did that too (until late 2008), but I would not really count those - as you mentioned, those do not circulate. In 1999, 2000 and 2001 (when the euro had been introduced but the coins had not been issued yet) France even had silver coins with a face value of 6.55957 francs (equivalent of €1) for example. :)

Christian

Figleaf

This must be the mother of all weird fractional coins. The least convoluted explanation I have found is that 5 of these coins should equal 1/16th gulden. In practice, it went for a duit. In fact, there were 4 or 8 duiten in a stuiver (depending on whether the duit is homeland or colonial) and 20 stuivers in a gulden. Figure it out.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

FosseWay

I was looking through the German States for something in KM and came across two coins denominated as 10½ and 21, which struck me as extraordinarily perverse. Can't now remember which state, what the denomination name was or even whether it was the 17th, 18th or 19th century volume.

translateltd

Quote from: FosseWay on December 22, 2012, 05:02:34 PM
I was looking through the German States for something in KM and came across two coins denominated as 10½ and 21, which struck me as extraordinarily perverse. Can't now remember which state, what the denomination name was or even whether it was the 17th, 18th or 19th century volume.

Unusual to see the numbers written out, but not a lot more weird than a guinea and half-guinea :-)