Author Topic: Fractional units  (Read 6957 times)

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Offline davidrj

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #30 on: March 28, 2016, 11:51:28 AM »
Interesting summation Peter.  We could add the Dutch rix dollar and stuiver in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) to that list ;)

David

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #31 on: March 29, 2016, 07:01:56 AM »
Turkey 2 1/2 Kurus

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #32 on: March 29, 2016, 07:03:11 AM »
French Indo China 1/4 cent

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #33 on: April 05, 2016, 10:20:27 PM »
Sweden 2/3 skilling. Also available in 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/6 and 1/12. I like the 2/3 best though. :)

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #34 on: April 05, 2016, 10:49:07 PM »
Lots of pretty expensive ⅔ taler coins in North German states. It was a useful denomination to convert Northern German silver into Southern German silver or vice versa.

Lots of 2½ cent and 2½ gulden coins in Dutch and Dutch colonial numismatics. The 2½ cent coins are a remnant of the Habsburg's binary system in which a stuiver was worth 8 duiten, so 2½ cent was 4 duiten. The 2½ gulden was the successor of the pre-decimal rijksdaalder of 50 stuivers. As the stuiver was equivalent to 5 decimal cent. the 2½ gulden also contained 50 stuivers.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #35 on: April 06, 2016, 07:27:01 PM »
Lots of pretty expensive ⅔ taler coins in North German states. It was a useful denomination to convert Northern German silver into Southern German silver or vice versa.


Not sure about expensive, but here is my only representative of such coins - ⅔ Taler from Hannover.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #36 on: April 06, 2016, 07:31:00 PM »
I haven't got any to illustrate, but in late medieval England there were at various times coins with the value of 13s 4d, or ⅔ of a pound, which was also equal to the mark, a unit of account. It was of course one of the strengths of the £sd and similar systems that a wide range of fractions was possible in "round" numbers - i.e. whole numbers of pence.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #37 on: April 07, 2016, 08:59:45 PM »
Mauritania 1/5 Ougiya

Offline Abhay

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #38 on: April 08, 2016, 05:37:41 AM »
Sorry that this is not a coin but a currency note - a 2 1/2 Rupee Note from the British India Period.

You will see that the Rupee Denomination is 2 Rupee and 8 Anna, which in itself is not a fractional denomination. But if you recall, 1 rupee was equal to 16 Annas, and hence the denomination is also 2 1/2 Rupee.

This rupee note has a panel, which indicates the denomination in several Indian Regional languages, and in many of them, the denomination is indicated as "ADHAI RUPAYA" meaning 2 and half rupee.

Abhay
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