Author Topic: Currency names used by only one country  (Read 5670 times)

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Offline <k>

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Currency names used by only one country
« on: December 06, 2012, 08:47:00 PM »
Some currency names may appear unique, but in fact their names show that they are related to other currencies. The Indonesian rupiah and the Maldivian rufiyaa are of course related to the rupee - see also Families of currencies and Currency names: last man standing (this one deals with currencies units/subunits that are individually the last existing member of such families).

However, some currency names, past and present, really have been unique. The most obvious ones are those based on a country name, for instance the zaire, which existed from 1967 to 1993 and was the currency of the country Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo).
100 sengi were equal to 1 likuta (plural makuta), and 100 makuta were equal to 1 zaïre.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2012, 08:50:03 PM »
The boliviano of Bolivia is an obvious one.

The ngultrum of Bhutan is divided into 100 chhertum - both unique names, so far as I know.

The inti was the currency of Peru between 1985 and 1991 and was named after Inti, the Inca sun god.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2012, 09:03:18 PM »
More examples:

Afghanistan: the afghani, divided into 100 pul.

Botswana: the pula, divided into 100 thebe.

Albania: the lek, divided into 100 qindarka.

Burma: the kyat, divided into 100 pya.

The euro is an obvious one.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2012, 09:11:02 PM »
Eritrea: the nakfa is divided into 100 cents.

Ethiopia: the birr is divided into 100 santim, which is presumably the equivalent of centime.

Croatia: the kuna. It is divided into 100 lipa, but I think that this name, referring to the linden tree, is related to another, possibly of the Czech lands or Slovakia.

Ghana: the cedi, divided into 100 pesewa.

Guatemala: the quetzal, divided into 100 centavos.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2012, 09:22:35 PM by translateltd »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2012, 09:15:08 PM »
Haiti: the gourde = 100 centimes

Honduras: the lempira = 100 centavos

Israel: 1 shekel = 100 agora, both unique names.

Laos: 1 kip = 100 att, both unique names.

Latvia: 1 lats = 100 santimi

Lesotho: 1 loti = 100 lisente

Lithuania: 1 litas = 100 centai
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2012, 09:19:53 PM »
Macao: 1 pataca = 100 avos, both unique names.

Madagascar: 1 ariary =  5 iraimbilanja, both unique names.

Malaysia: 1 ringgit = 100 sen

Mauritania: 1 ouguiya = 5 khoums, both unique names.

Mongolia: 1 tögrög or tugrik = 100 möngö

Mozambique: 1 metical = 100 centavos
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2012, 09:23:49 PM »
Nicaragua: 1 córdoba = 100 centavos

Nigeria: 1 naira = 100 kobo, both unique names.

Paraguay: 1 guaraní = 100 céntimos

Papua New Guinea: 1 kina = 100 toea, both unique names.

Panama: 1 balboa = 100 centésimos

Poland: 1 zloty = 100 groszy
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translateltd

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2012, 09:24:10 PM »

Albania: the lek, divided into 100 qindarka.


Qindar/qindarka is another "centime" cognate: "qind" = 100 in Albanian.  If you squint (sqind?) a little, you can see the connection with "cent".

Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2012, 09:26:17 PM »
São Tomé and Príncipe: 1 dobra = 100 centimos

Sierra Leone: 1 leone = 100 cents

Swaziland: 1 lilangeni = 100 cents

South Africa: 1 rand = 100 cents
« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 01:13:15 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2012, 09:31:57 PM »
Tajikistan: 1 somoni = 100 diram.  The currency is named after the father of the Tajik nation, Ismail Samani (also spelled Ismoil Somoni).

Thailand: 1 baht = 100 satang

Tonga: 1 pa'anga = 100 seniti (cents)

Ukraine: 1 hryvnia = 1 kopiyok (kopecks)

Venezuela: 1 bolivar = 100 centimos

Vietnam: the đồng, formerly subdivided into 10 hào, which was further subdivided into 10 xu. (Xu comes from sou, apparently).

[Minor adjustment above: seniti does not have a separate plural form]
« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 01:14:11 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2012, 09:33:43 PM »
Angola: 1 kwanza = 100 centimos. Formerly it was equal to 100 lwei, another unique name.
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translateltd

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2012, 09:47:40 PM »
Cook Islands: Tene (the local transliteration of "cent"), not used in other countries/languages that I know of.  It's "sene" in Samoa.

Hawaii: Hapalua, Hapaha (literally 'half' and 'quarter' as I understand it - the terms used on the half and quarter dollars of 1883), also Keneta, which I assume is another transcription of "cent" (the dime of 1883 reads "umi keneta").  Hapawalu, too, on the eighth dollar, which I think was just a pattern.  Take of the "hapa" prefix and you have lua, ha and walu (two, four and eight, cf. rua, whaa and waru in NZ Maori).


Offline Figleaf

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2012, 01:08:57 AM »
São Tomé and Príncipe: 1 dobra = 100 centimos

Here is a dobra from Brazil.

Also, I think the Vietnamese Xu takes its name from the French sou, better known as sol, so derived from solidus and actually a shilling. :D

Are Bolivar and Boliviano not a bit too close to be unique?

Peter
« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 01:26:54 AM by Figleaf »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2012, 01:14:55 AM »
Thanks, have done a couple of edits to incorporate these.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Currency names used by only one country
« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2012, 01:23:58 AM »
Chinese renminbi (yes, yes, yuan=yen=won)
Costa Rican Colon
Egyptian guerche
Gambian dalasi (or is that somehow related to MT thaler?)
Myanmar Kyat

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.