Author Topic: Currency names in another language  (Read 4335 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names in another language
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2012, 07:06:05 PM »
two genders to German's three

That's because the masculine and feminine genders merged into the common gender, as in Dutch.

German: "der Mann", "die Frau".

Dutch: "de man", "de vrouw".
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Currency names in another language
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2012, 07:21:40 PM »
Indeed, though relics of the old masculine and feminine genders survive in Swedish.

You write (and if you're talking proper, you also say) den gamle mannen but gamla with everything else in the definite declension, whether common or neuter, singular or plural. This only applies to male humans (possibly male animals in general? not sure), not objects that once were of the masculine gender.

The Swedish word for 'person', 'human being' is människa (compare Mensch). One always uses the feminine pronouns, hon henne hennes, to refer to en människa because the word was previously feminine, as it is in German. Similarly, klockan is always feminine: Vad är klockan? -- Hon är fem i halv åtta (What's the time? -- It's 25 past seven.)

Offline <k>

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Re: Currency names in another language
« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2012, 07:25:26 PM »
"Der Mensch" is masculine in German. I don't know in what circumstances "Die Person" (feminine) is used in German, though.
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Currency names in another language
« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2012, 07:35:54 PM »
Sorry, I'm rather rusty. I could have sworn it was feminine, but looking it up I see it's one of those weak masculines that declines -en in the oblique cases, so perhaps that's what confused me.

Person is probably feminine in German because it was in the language it was borrowed from (whether French or Latin). German tends to retain the original gender for loanwords from languages that have an analogous gender system. Russian, on the other hand, tends not to, preferring to assign loanwords to the relevant gender based on how the word ends.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Currency names in another language
« Reply #19 on: December 07, 2012, 11:23:13 PM »
But the adjective is "hell". "Das Bier ist hell" but "ein helles Bier".

Correct. And that is why the noun referring to that beer, derived from that adjective, is "Helles". The "Heller" has nothing to do with a drink, no matter how good or bad it tastes. :)

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Move to Prussia and learn your own language.  ;D

What? Get a time machine and go back more than 50 years, to some time when Prussia existed? Nein danke. I do use Time Machine and have a Time Capsule though, hehe.

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