Author Topic: Circulation sets with poorly unified design  (Read 16482 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Circulation sets with poorly unified design
« Reply #45 on: May 19, 2014, 09:54:20 PM »


Guzman's design for the reverse of the 50 francs, which also appears on the 100 francs, must be one of the most beautiful and exotic to appear on any circulation coin, and as elegant in its way as Bazor's similar design for the reverse of the 1, 2 and 5 franc coins. Though the designs in total stem from different eras and are in different styles, there is still an overall effect of elegance, so any sense of mismatch is very small.

Offline <k>

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Re: Circulation sets with poorly unified design
« Reply #46 on: May 19, 2014, 09:59:54 PM »
New Caledonia's current coinage still carries the same design of Marianne (by Lucien Bazor) on the lower denominations as appears on the coinage of French Polynesia. In this case, the reverse design is again by Bazor, and is characteristically elegant.





50 centimes, kagu.  This coin is long defunct, but the design still appears on the 1, 2 and 5 franc coins.

Offline <k>

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Re: Circulation sets with poorly unified design
« Reply #47 on: May 19, 2014, 10:05:11 PM »
Again, the higher denominations now feature (since the 1960s) designs by Raymond Joly on the obverse and reverse.





20 francs.





50 francs, native hut.





10 francs, outrigger canoe.



Again, the overall designs are so elegant, that the mismatch between the lower and upper denominations is easy to overlook.

Offline <k>

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Re: Circulation sets with poorly unified design
« Reply #48 on: May 19, 2014, 10:09:13 PM »
By contrast, in case you were wondering, the New Hebrides, a Franco-British condominium (now Vanuatu), did not issue its coins until the 1960s, and all the designs, obverse and reverse, were by Raymond Joly, so there is no stylistic clash in this case, however small.















1     franc.    Stylised frigate bird.
2     francs.  Stylised frigate bird.
5     francs.  Stylised frigate bird.
10   francs.  Native mask flanked by cowry.
20   francs.  Native mask flanked by cowry.
50   francs.  Carved ceremonial staff of natives.
100 francs.  Carved ceremonial staff of natives.

Designer: Raymond Joly.

Offline <k>

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Re: Circulation sets with poorly unified design
« Reply #49 on: April 29, 2018, 01:24:41 PM »

Reverse designs of the Sierra Leone 1964 circulation series.



This series did not work well as a unified set of designs. The realistic fish and tree did not go well with symbolic ring of rice grains or the stylised palm leaves. The 20 cents would have looked better with a thematic subject, rather than the heraldic lion, which was additionally just one heraldic lion too many for the set. After all, it was taken from the coat of arms, which appears on the 1 leone coin. It seems there was a lack of ideas and imagination here.

Perhaps it is not surprising that the designs were replaced in the 1970s, with the plain coat of arms being used as the common reverse design. The designer of this set was Michael Rizzello, who later designed some superb sets, such as Gambia (1966) and Bermuda (1970s), so perhaps he learnt from the Sierra Leone experience.



See also: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone.

Offline <k>

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Re: Circulation sets with poorly unified design
« Reply #50 on: July 04, 2018, 12:00:17 AM »
Tonga issued its first national circulation set in 1967. The obverse of all the coins carried an effigy of the late Queen Salote. As for the reverse designs, the 1 and 2 seniti depicted a giant tortoise, while the 5 and 10 seniti showed the Southern Cross flanked by two stylised sprigs. The 20 and 50 seniti, and also the 1 pa'anga and (not illustrated) 2 pa'anga showed the country's coat of arms.

The design of the giant tortoise was an attractive one, but the sprigs were distinctly old-fashioned. It is not unusual to show the coat of arms on the country's highest denomination, but here four coins shared that design. And in fact, three reverse designs were spread across eight coins, a situation that reminds me of some of the modern euro sets. The attractive and realistic tortoise designs were followed by unattractive stylised sprigs and the heraldic coat of arms. The designs of the set just do not gel as a whole.

In 1975 Tonga produced a new design series, that was much more interesting:

Circulation sets consisting entirely of FAO-themed coins: Tonga.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 08:04:58 PM by <k> »