Author Topic: Defunct currency names of modern times  (Read 10974 times)

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Offline villa66

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2012, 05:38:19 PM »
The American mill of 1792 (which in a Federal context, and by WoC convention, has never been "coined") still makes occasional appearances as the unit of account it has always been. Granted, the appearances seem more and more archaic, and arcane--but not yet totally so, especially from a property tax standpoint. And then there is the gas pump any day of the week, and though we don't think of it as such society-wide, I personally think "mills" when I see, say, or hear said the price of a gallon of gas...today, "two-ninety-six, nine." That is, "two (dollars) ninety-six (cents), nine (mills.)"

 ;) v.


Offline <k>

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2012, 11:57:35 PM »
Sadly Slovenia joined the euro zone in recent years, so now the tolar and its sub-unit the stotinov are defunct. No other country uses those exact names, though semantically the tolar is related to the thaler and the dollar, etc., while the name stotinov bears some resemblance to the name of the Bulgarian sub-unit, the stotinka.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2016, 01:19:50 PM by <k> »
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translateltd

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2012, 01:32:23 AM »
while the name stotinov bears some resemblance to the name of the Bulgarian sub-unit, the stotinka.


Russian "sto" = "hundred", so "stotinka" etc. will mean something like "little hundredth"

Something I discovered recently, and which is not quite totally irrelevant to this sub-topic, is the name of the artist Friedrich Stowasser, which he changed to Friedensreich Hundertwasser, under which he became much more famous.  I suspect his etymology may have been a little dubious, but still ...

Offline <k>

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2012, 02:04:40 PM »
The keping is a familiar name to numismatists, but it lasted until 1909 in Kelantan and Trengganu, now both parts of Malaysia.

According to Wikipedia:

The qiran (قران), also qerun or kran, was a currency of Iran between 1825 and 1932. It was subdivided into 20 shahi or 1000 dinar and was worth one tenth of a toman. The rial replaced the kran at par in 1932, although it was divided into one hundred (new) dinars. The qiran is no longer an official denomination but the term still enjoys wide usage among Iranians.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #19 on: December 06, 2012, 02:09:18 PM »
From Wikipedia:

The syli was the currency of Guinea between 1971 and 1985. It was subdivided into 100 cauris. The word syli means "elephant", while cauri refers to the shells formerly used as currency. The syli replaced the Guinean franc at a rate of 1 syli = 10 francs.

Coins of 50 cauris, 1, 2 and 5 sylis were made of aluminium. Banknotes of the 1971 series were issued in denominations of 10, 25, 50 and 100 sylis. A second series of banknotes was issued in 1980, this time in different colours and with four additional denominations – 1, 2, 5 and 500 sylis notes.

The syli was replaced by the Guinean franc in 1985 at par.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #20 on: December 06, 2012, 02:10:08 PM »
From Wikipedia:

The inti was the currency of Peru between 1985 and 1991. Its ISO 4217 code was PEI and its abbreviation in local use was "I/." The inti was divided into 100 céntimos. The inti replaced the inflation-stricken sol. The new currency was named after Inti, the Inca sun god.

History

The inti was introduced on 1 February 1985, replacing the sol which had suffered from high inflation. One inti was equivalent to 1,000 soles. Coins denominated in the new unit were put into circulation from May 1985 and banknotes followed in June of that year.

By 1990, the inti had itself suffered from high inflation. As an interim measure, from January to July 1991, the "inti en millones" (I/m.) was used as a unit of account. One inti en millones was equal to 1,000,000 intis and hence to one new sol. The nuevo sol ("new sol") was adopted on 1 July 1991, replacing the inti at an exchange rate of a million to one. Thus: 1 new sol = 1,000,000 inti = 1,000,000,000 old soles.

Inti notes and coins are no longer legal tender in Peru, nor can they be exchanged for notes and coins denominated in the current nuevo sol.
Coins

Coins were introduced in 1985 in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 centimos (designs were taken from the previous 10, 50, 100 and 500 soles de oro coins), plus 1 and 5 intis. The 1 céntimo coin was issued only in 1985. The 5-céntimo coins were issued until 1986. All the other denominations were issued until 1988. All coins featured Navy Admiral Miguel Grau: cent coins on the reverse, Inti coins on the obverse.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #21 on: December 06, 2012, 02:35:36 PM »
Russian "sto" = "hundred", so "stotinka" etc. will mean something like "little hundredth"

As for the Hundertwasser part of your reply, see my comment here:
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,19114.0.html

Maybe we should add the grosz? Oops, mixed the topics up. That comment will go to the "Last Man Standing" thread ...

Christian

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2012, 03:49:48 PM »
The American mill of 1792 (which in a Federal context, and by WoC convention, has never been "coined") still makes occasional appearances as the unit of account it has always been. Granted, the appearances seem more and more archaic, and arcane--but not yet totally so, especially from a property tax standpoint. And then there is the gas pump any day of the week, and though we don't think of it as such society-wide, I personally think "mills" when I see, say, or hear said the price of a gallon of gas...today, "two-ninety-six, nine." That is, "two (dollars) ninety-six (cents), nine (mills.)"

This is an interesting observation which IMV supports the idea that the öre should not be included in this or the 'last man standing' threads. Because the mill has existed as a unit (whether coined or not doesn't matter), people think of it, as you say. Gas/petrol in the UK is also priced in fractions of a penny, but a price of, say 147.9p/L is most normally read as "one forty-seven point nine" or "one four seven point nine", or more rarely "a hundred and forty-seven point nine" -- but the fraction is always expressed as a decimal of a penny. There aren't now and never have been any mills or any other unit smaller than a (decimal) penny in the UK; even when the halfpenny physically existed, bank transactions ignored it.

(And yes, people in the UK do habitually refer to petrol prices in pence, not pounds, despite the headline price per unit having been more than £1 for a good part of the last 40 years, due to the conversion from imperial to metric. The price per gallon went over £1 sometime around 1980, I believe, and it went over £1 per litre in the second half of the last decade. I can't remember precisely when the law changed from gallons to litres, but it was sometime in the late 90s.)

Offline <k>

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2012, 03:58:34 PM »
the öre should not be included in this or the 'last man standing' threads.

Yes, it still exists in theory as the subunit of all the kroner/kronor/kronur currencies. If they are revalued in years to come, that sub-unit will be revived. I did point this out early on, in one of the two threads.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2012, 04:25:02 PM »
In the "last man standing" topic, FosseWay mentioned that defunct names may of course be re-introduced, for example due to a currency reform. One name that comes to mind is the Kreuzer. It ceased to exist in the mid-19th century. Today it is used in Entenhausen, the German version of Duckburg, but I digress.

A couple of years ago, when I first heard about the Brazilian Cruzeiro, I thought that was a translated Kreuzer. Turned out I was wrong; while "cruz" means "Kreuz" means "cross", the Brazilian one is different from the "Alpine" one. ;)  But let's stay "in" Brazil for a second - the Cruzeiro is gone too, and the Real is back ...

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #25 on: December 06, 2012, 04:32:28 PM »
The Brazilian Cruzeiro refers to the Southern Cross constellation, I understand.
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Offline malj1

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #26 on: December 06, 2012, 10:16:06 PM »
The one mil coin was the smallest denomination of the Hong Kong dollar from 1863 to 1866, after this date it was no longer issued but may have circulated much longer. Its value was one tenth of a cent, or a thousandth of a dollar. Despite being minted under British rule, they did not feature the reigning monarch as all other coins did, due to the hole in the middle.



From Wikipedia
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Offline Afrasi

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #27 on: December 06, 2012, 11:26:53 PM »
Despite being minted under British rule, they did not feature the reigning monarch as all other coins did, due to the hole in the middle.

What about the VR below the hole at the reverse?

Offline villa66

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #28 on: December 07, 2012, 05:30:16 AM »
The one mil coin was the smallest denomination of the Hong Kong dollar from 1863 to 1866....
Nice! I had completely overlooked this one.

 :) v.

Offline malj1

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Re: Defunct currency names of modern times
« Reply #29 on: December 07, 2012, 11:48:44 AM »
What about the VR below the hole at the reverse?

Yes, but no portrait of Victoria.
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