Author Topic: Boordgeld or ship money  (Read 13459 times)

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Offline malj1

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2014, 02:12:21 AM »
Another is on eBay today this too is a little pricy but very tempting.

NETHERLANDS HOLLAND AMSTERDAM BOORDGELD SMN 500 (5 GUILDERS) BIMETALLIC

NV STOOMV MIJ (Amsterdam Steamship Society) aluminium in copper annulus 38mm, edge lettered.

SEMPER MARE NAVIGANDUM (the oceans will always be navigated)

 Perhaps Bimat will like this one too. ;D
Malcolm
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2014, 09:39:34 AM »
This is the key to completing the series. I am surprised you don't have the 5 cent, Mal. It is the easiest to find.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2014, 10:27:04 AM »
I hadn't noticed a 5 cent was included, mainly concentrated on watching out for the 50 cent.
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2014, 10:26:10 AM »
I now have the BOORDGELD 500 token.

SMN rev. N.V. STOOMV. MIJ. "NEDERLAND" AMSTERDAM BOORDGELD 500 edge inscription SEMPER MARE NAVIGANDUM

Bi-metal Aluminum + Bronze 37.9mm.

20,000 of the 500 cents issued:
1948: 10,000
1949 10,000
Malcolm
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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2014, 02:57:00 PM »
Congratulations, Mal. I like to use this series to argue that there is no sharp border between coins and tokens. The Canadian bank tokens are a further case to make this point. Surprisingly, many people find this somewhat difficult to digest.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Kushi

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2014, 10:53:06 PM »
Mal, is there a difference between the 1948 and 1949 strikings of the 500 cent (five guilder) token?

Offline malj1

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2014, 11:23:46 PM »
Mal, is there a difference between the 1948 and 1949 strikings of the 500 cent (five guilder) token?

I am unaware of of any difference. I found the information here where it was translated from the Dutch.
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #22 on: March 22, 2014, 11:48:17 PM »
An interesting page giving details of these and also some paper issues.

Quote via Google translate:

After the liberation, there was a huge amount of so-called war of money in circulation, including the amount of black money was huge. Obviously, there was no bank guarantee towards all that bad money.
The ban on the export of Dutch money would provide for international shipping for a big problem because it is precisely in this period carry many ships on the Dutch East Indies for transporting large numbers of soldiers, emigrants and returnees.
During these trips, it was important that there is a payment for hands would be so that they could do with the CADI and / or the ship's store, the necessary purchases on board had to be for certain services such as hairdressing and paid the photographer.
There was therefore an "Emergency Payment Instrument" created and this new money was aptly named board money, or also ship money.


Read more here
Malcolm
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2014, 12:15:37 AM »
Yes, a currency reform was undertaken right after the liberation, but it had largely ended when the boordgeld pieces were made. In 1948, the currency was unconvertible, therefore could not be exported - pure Colbertism - and the shipping line companies needed the money to lift it off the emigrants while they were on the ships.

Yes, there was a wave of emigration, but it was not towards the Netherlands East Indies, but towards the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The NEI was an area in turmoil.

Not sure about the shipping of soldiers, but I know that there were plenty liberated KNIL soldiers around in the NEI and the Korean crisis was looming (the Netherlands was an early UN member), making the NEI a less likely destination for troop transports.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2014, 02:29:40 AM »
I do know of and have met several families that were repatriated at that time from NEI to Australia where they settled, some were Dutch soldiers with their wives and families.
Malcolm
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Offline Kushi

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2014, 06:58:36 PM »
Frits J. Bingen wrote an article "Ship's Money" for The Fare Box, in March, 1974, with the mintages for the SMN series.

2.50 F.    50,000
1.00        75,000
0.50        50,000
0.25        44,000
0.10      190,000
0.05      170,000

Also given are the mintage figures for the Holland America Line tokens.

25 cent    10,000
10            12,000
 5             10,000

All 67 years of The Fare Box are available online at vectuirst.org, but at present only for members of the American Vecturist Association.

Offline malj1

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #26 on: April 26, 2016, 04:54:51 AM »
I have just noticed the listing only gives the one 25 cent mintage of 44,000

This may be for the square aluminium piece or the withdrawn round bronze 25 cent? ...see Reply #2

I bought the 25 cent bronze for 3 euro so not as nice as that at the head of this thread. I now also have the 5 cent token.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #27 on: April 26, 2016, 11:09:11 PM »
Discussion on coins and tokens is now here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #28 on: February 09, 2017, 12:02:17 AM »
I have now completed my set of these with the 50
Malcolm
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Re: Boordgeld or ship money
« Reply #29 on: February 09, 2017, 09:20:21 AM »
Pretty good, Malcolm. Now, you can concentrate on the two other "Boordgeld" series. The HAL series is slightly more difficult to find, but the Van Ommeren series is hard to find. While the tokens are Dutch, I'd argue that they are related to Australian history through the ships' destinations.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.