Author Topic: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?  (Read 5156 times)

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Offline repindia

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2012, 02:24:38 AM »
Interesting experience. I do clean coins but leave these sort of coins alone since in my experience it is difficult to take the grime off and even if you do the coin might not appear good enough. There are some others in which cleaning would be a waste of time since for a small profit you need to invest a lot of time! I would rather let the eventual buyer take the pains of cleaning it giving it away at a discount.  :)

Offline malj1

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2012, 03:29:21 AM »
Maybe as I am a token collector its different, but going back to my soap and water method, here are before and after images from this morning. This was definitely worthwhile and no harm was done. Anyway I have no intention of selling mine.
Malcolm
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Offline repindia

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2012, 08:48:42 PM »
This sure looks better after the bath. Is this a copper token? I believe it should not matter whether it is a token or a coin.

Offline malj1

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2012, 09:19:06 PM »
it is purple plastic! 1940's Bakelite.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline cmerc

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2012, 06:53:04 AM »
Imo, Malcolm's coin looked good even before the bath, though cleaning made it a bit better.  I will never try cleaning coins again.  As Vikram (repindia) says, too much effort for too little payoff.  Best idea is to stay away from problem coins altogether. 

Have a great holiday season all!
Defending this hobby against a disapproving family since 1998.

Offline aarkay

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2012, 02:50:33 PM »
Hi…

I am a little confused ???….looking at various suggestions/methods that have been given whether to clean or not a clean a coin…..why to clean a coin at all….is it for enhancing the aesthetic appeal …..or to  increase its notional value….will this notional value be of any use when one do not intend selling the coin in his lifetime…also when this notional value one is talking about is highly subjective and inconsistent with respect to time… I hope I am not sounding a bit irrational…your views please….

Aarkay   
Why worry about dead yesterdays and unborn tomorrows….live in the present…a present for you today…

Offline Figleaf

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2012, 08:44:37 PM »
Coins don't have a fixed value. What you get for them depends on who chances to see them offered. Therefore, on average, cleaning does nothing to value. One extreme is people who think a coin is ruined when cleaned. I am in the opposite corner. If I can get cleaned coins for a fraction of catalogue value, I'll take them, see their natural colour come back with time and thumb my nose at those who claim they can tell that it was ever cleaned. I have already shown a few of these and no one spotted a single one.

In short, cleaning is not for value, but for getting an unobstructed look at details, otherwise hidden by gook. Take a look at a lot of uncleaned Roman coins, just out of the ground and you'll get a very sharp look of what I am taking about.

Peter
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Offline cmerc

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2012, 04:16:12 AM »
I agree with Peter on this.  I can't afford to collect shiny UNC specimens of all British India coins.  I will go bankrupt in no time.  I am happier trying to assemble a more complete collection of decent specimens. 

Regarding this coin, I was embarrassed by my purchase - it was a scarce but dirt encrusted, black coin.  Since I did not pay a lot for it, after much deliberation (and inputs from WOC members), I decided to try to clean it.  I am reasonably satisfied by the results, and less embarrassed by my purchase.  In 5-10 years, the natural colour will return and remove all signs of cleaning. 
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Offline aarkay

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2012, 07:50:45 AM »
Hi…

Peter….agree fully with the reason…logical….value is notional but happiness is subjective… cleaning to unlock the unknown should be rationale behind cleaning…

Aarkay

Why worry about dead yesterdays and unborn tomorrows….live in the present…a present for you today…

akona20

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #24 on: December 27, 2012, 07:57:48 AM »
The therory (traditional) about cleaning was that you clean to attribute. If you can attribute then you don't clean.

However if a number of new collectors apparently fascinated by bright shiney coins of certian periods then coins will be cleaned through lack of knowledge by some collectors of natural processes and in the believe that it will add value. Certain slabbing companies offer cleaning services so it must be okat, mustn't it?

Offline villa66

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Re: To clean or not to clean this Bombay Presidency milled rupee?
« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2013, 06:08:59 PM »
...If I can get cleaned coins for a fraction of catalogue value, I'll take them, see their natural colour come back with time and thumb my nose at those who claim they can tell that it was ever cleaned. I have already shown a few of these and no one spotted a single one.

This is a perfectly reasonable approach--the buying cleaned coins for a fraction of catalog value--because very often, a fraction of catalog value is exactly what cleaned coins are worth. And it's true that given enough time--sometimes many decades--coins will often reacquire an acceptable (maybe even a natural-looking) color. So sometimes a cleaned coin is a defensible choice, and sometimes a cleaned coin is the only choice available. (The encrusted copper ancients posted here help make that point.)

But I wouldn't thumb my nose at anyone whose says they can detect a cleaned coin even after several decades, because I know there are coin-people with a better eye for that than I have. Neither would I mistake folks who are quiet about a cleaned coin for people who don't know the coin was cleaned--a lot of times I'm sure it's just politeness.

Does cleaning affect a coin's value? I like what some of the "keepers" of the American coin hobby have had to say:

Here, in the 1977 1st edition of The Official American Numismatic Association Grading Standards for United States Coins: “Experienced numismatists will usually say that a coin is best left alone and not cleaned. However, most beginning collectors have the idea that ‘brilliant is best’ and sometimes feel that cleaning a coin will ‘improve’ it. As the penchant for cleaning seems to be universal, and also because there are some instances in which cleaning can actually be beneficial, some important aspects are presented here…[but]…It is probably true to state that no matter what one’s intentions are, for every single coin actually improved in some way by cleaning, a dozen or more have been decreased in value.”

And then note what happened to 1977’s “dozen or more have been decreased in value” by the time the 1996 5th edition of that very sameThe Official American Numismatic Association Grading Standards for United States Coins appeared:  ..[but]…It is probably true to state that no matter what one’s intentions are, for every single coin actually improved in some way by cleaning, a hundred or more have been reduced in value.”

 :) v.