B.E.I.C.: Bombay Copper Pice (3 coins) and a question

Started by Overlord, July 12, 2008, 12:33:56 PM

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Overlord

Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question, but why do we suddenly have these crude-looking coins in the early 19th century when better-looking ones (with everything on the flan) were already being made towards the end of the 18th century (such as the one I had posted here)?

Obverse: Bale mark of the company; years 18XX, 180X, and 18X2


Reverse: Balance (What is the  word between the scales on the reverse?)



Rangnath

Are you suggesting that all earlier copper pice coins are better centered than all later copper pice coins?  Or that all earlier copper pice coins in your collection are better centered than all later copper pice coins in your collection? 

Possible answer:  Due to lead and mercury poisoning at the mint, the accumulated affects on the performance of the workers was reflected in the increase of off centered strikes.

richie

Figleaf

The earlier good-looking coins were minted mechanically in London and Birmingham. The later coins were minted by hand in India. Around 1800, the sea lanes were unsafe for large transportation of coins, due to the Napoleonic wars. In addition, there was a shortage of coins in Britain, so that supplying the EIC with coins was not up very high on the list of priorities. Peace and the reforms of 1816 remedied the situation. By 1835, Indian mints were mechanically equipped and the difference in minting method disappeared.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Rangnath

Great answer Peter!  It sounds so much better than mine.
richie

lusomosa

Still, when I think about " European " mints in Asia during the late XVIII / early XIX Century, Only Lead poisoning perhaps in combination with Rice wine, can explain coins like this one from Portuguese india   ;D  ( D. Miguel  Rupia 1833 GOA ).
I think you are right Peter  :),  but I like Richie's explanation.  ;)

LP

Figleaf

Quote from: lusomosa on July 13, 2008, 07:55:00 AM
Only Lead poisoning perhaps in combination with Rice wine, can explain coins like this one

That's a better explanation. :D However, keep in mind that crummy looking coins from India usually command a higher price than glorious pieces of precision struck metal. Also, keep in mind that the great coin you show would easily be recognized as modern art today ("the artist put his soul into this portrait, that lays bare what he had for lunch"), while those sharp portrait coins overlord has shown us would actually look old-fashioned to modern art lovers ("sheer figurative lack of style cannot hide the lack of talent and creativity of the artist"). ;D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Rangnath

What a beautiful coin LP!  And I mean that completely and without sarcasm.

I lived in Goa once, in a grass hut in sight of the beach and net fisherman casting before a colonial church above a cliff where a river meandered into the sea.  My creative abilities as hippie poet tempered with Beat Angst and Sexual Longing were hampered by the local drink which was too plentiful and far too cheap to resisit.   At least it was safer than water, in a manner of speaking.

If only I had collected coins then!
richie

shariqkhan

Legend is nothing to do Bombay. The legend between Balance is "Adl" which means Justice .  British traders came in reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir whose Justice was famous as "Adl - E - Jahangir". The Balance on the coin is also represent Equality of "Justice"  by the ruler of that time(BEIC) 

Overlord