Author Topic: Unidentified counterstamp/countermark on EIC 1835 half (1/2) anna  (Read 1475 times)

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Offline cmerc

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Hello All!

Found this coin recently on eBay.  It has a 'W.H'  countermark/counterstamp on the obverse over the shield between the two lions.  Any ideas on what this may represent, or more importantly, is it of any significance or value?  What does 'W.H' stand for?  I am guessing that it may possibly be a merchant countermark.  (Why on earth did merchants countermark a coin, particularly an Indian one?)  This item was shipped from the UK, if that is of any relevance.  The only related page I could find on the internet is:
http://www.exonumia.com/art/cmb.htm

Other than the countermark "damage", I would give this coin a AU grade with some remaining luster.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Unidentified counterstamp/countermark on EIC 1835 half (1/2) anna
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2012, 12:48:52 AM »
Not very much to go on. Not a counterstamp, but a punchmark. The letters seem well aligned. Together with the dot in between, they suggest one punch, therefore repeated use. However, the coin has seen little or no circulation. Possibly a shop ticket (that may explain the single punch) that was forgotten, possibly the good luck coin of someone called William or even a love token: a gift to a partner to be, so that she'd remember Willie boy while he was gone.

Not listed in J. Gavin Scott.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

akona20

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Re: Unidentified counterstamp/countermark on EIC 1835 half (1/2) anna
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2012, 01:17:49 AM »
The countermark should not affect the grading of the coin if it is genuine. It appears to be a little late for a William Hessing type mark.

Offline cmerc

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Re: Unidentified counterstamp/countermark on EIC 1835 half (1/2) anna
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2012, 10:56:40 PM »
Thanks for the inputs.  I did find another American coin with a similar countermark/punchmark.  It also has a similar 'W.H' punched on it.  Below is the link and the picture.  The time period is similar (1835 and 1855) - could it be from the same shop/merchant?
http://myhalfcents.com/counterstamps.shtml

Figleaf is right - probably a merchant token or a love (?) token.  I hope Willie boy got lucky with the help of this coin.   Interesting coin nevertheless and reasonably good condition, it is going into my permanent collection.   @Akona:  almost certainly not a (Jahn?) William Hessing mark - he usually used 'JWH' and during the late 1700's early 1800's. 

Another interesting (possibly unimportant) feature I have noticed about the EIC 1835 half annas is that the wear on the reverse is always the highest on the 'A' of the HALF, even on AUnc coins and coins without any countermarks.  Probably has to do with the design of the coin, the shield on the obverse possibly pushes the HALF up and makes the 'A' the highest point on the relief.  Or maybe the 'A' in the punch wears out the fastest... 

 

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Offline cmerc

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Re: Unidentified counterstamp/countermark on EIC 1835 half (1/2) anna
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2012, 11:11:51 PM »
f
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Unidentified counterstamp/countermark on EIC 1835 half (1/2) anna
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2012, 01:44:28 PM »
The punch on the US coin looks similar, but is different. Look at the relative thickness of the strokes, in particular the third diagonal stroke in the W. My guess is that they were made by different persons with the same initials.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.