Not so Persian and not so Greek

Started by Ancientnoob, July 15, 2012, 04:58:03 AM

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Ancientnoob

Persia, Lycia (Lycea, Lykia, Patara),
c. BC 450? 
Autonomous Lycia Silver Stater 9.16g
???/Lion Head


This obscure location in Ancient southwest Turkey, had a very interesting history spanning centuries. Deep in the shifting sands lies on of the first democratic confederations and one of the well known accepted models in which the government of the United States of America was built. It was mentioned several times in the Federalist Papers both by James Madison and Alexander Hamilton. The city of Lycia was the site of the governing body of the Lycian League, a 23 member confederation of city states. Recent excavations of the city have unearthed a Bouleuterion or "Parliment" building. It is written that each of the 23 members sent representatives to the Bouleuterion of Lycia the number depending on the size of the city state. Well in Lycia a wealthy somebody dropped this.....

Interesting historical and somewhat complicated events surround Lycia during the accepted minting date of this coin. The obscurity of the Luwein language in which Lycia wrote and spoke further complicates the issue of attribution, as only limited corpus of inscriptions exist. 450 BC, when the Persians where defeated by the Greeks, Lycia became Autonomous and this would have been their stater. What pushes me to post this is the obverse animals are often poorly or inaccuratly described..my coin does not help the matter and is often left at Uncertain Dynast with Pegasus or a horse or a Pig or my guess a flying pig.  ;D So if the world of coins wants to comment or share a source, please, by all means.

Nate
"Everything is worth what its purchaser will pay for it."

- Publius Syrius

Ancientnoob

"Everything is worth what its purchaser will pay for it."

- Publius Syrius

akona20

What are the animals on these coins? This is an interesting subject an one that has teased people for centuries. A number of things have occurred and things are genraly accepted because they have been described as something or other in a major reference text. However at times we find major reference texts to be in error and it becomes a major effort to change them. I coins of the ancient world it is almost impossible to have things changed because it causes "probelms". When the truth presents a so called problem the truth is not at fault it is those who allow the error to exist.

There is also conjecture on what gods are shown on various coins. An even bigger battle exist in this area if you seek the absolute truth.

Ancientnoob

I have read about the various issues involved in attributing the gods on some early Phoenician silver pieces and the problem also exists in the realm of Persian siglos. The truth behind the ancient coins adds so much to its collecting appeal. INMHO

"Everything is worth what its purchaser will pay for it."

- Publius Syrius

Figleaf

My uninitiated eyes see a wine bottle on one side, a roaring (or yawning) lion on the other. Since wine bottles weren't invented yet, I'll settle for a tuskless boar, which would go well with the yawning. An early cartoon comment on endless meetings, maybe? :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.